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  1. #1
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    Unhappy SSD fails randomly for no reason

    I've had a rarely-used PC with a replaced motherboard, boot SSD, and data mechanical drive for two years. I recently upgraded from 64 bit Win 7 to 64 bit Win 10 with no problems. Since it was rarely used, I had only 4 GB of RAM.

    I get a new user who needs it for a graduate school project and is irked by slow performance. I purchase a standard pair of 8 GB DDR3 1600 RAM chips and install them - carefully, as usual.

    I attempt to boot up and it suddenly won't recognize the SSD. I recheck all the connections, but they are secure. I have no choice but to reinstall Win 7 on the mechanical drive. Any ideas as to what killed the SSD? This is the first time it has happened - I have two other PCs with SSD boot drives with no problems.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    It might help if we had the SSD and motherboard chipset/model # to work with.

    There's an older generic walkthrough that might help: Why did my SSD "disappear" from my system?

    It's possible that some SSDs just don't 'like' lots of down time, they're mostly fitted for longer sessions, harder working machines and frequent on-off-on roadwarrior type notebooks, where the later generation drives are very reliable. We don't have a lot of data for drives that are used infrequently with long inactive spells.

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  4. #3
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    loose cable

  5. #4
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    I gotta say that is one of the weirdest T/S procedures I have seen, not saying it does not work but(on Crucial web site), for the life of me I can't think of why it would. Glad the newer ones are not as fussy
    Do you have any idea why it would work?

    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wavy View Post
    I gotta say that is one of the weirdest T/S procedures I have seen, not saying it does not work but(on Crucial web site), for the life of me I can't think of why it would. Glad the newer ones are not as fussy
    Do you have any idea why it would work?

    I don't understand why you would say something like this. What is your technical justification for it not to work?

    I have a Crucial SSD and yes, I have done the procedure and yes, it brought the SSD back to life. My experience with that particular SSD makes me believe it may even be simply necessary to leave the computer on for a while and then reboot and that will bring the SSD back.
    Rui
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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    I don't understand why you would say something like this. What is your technical justification for it not to work?

    I have a Crucial SSD and yes, I have done the procedure and yes, it brought the SSD back to life. My experience with that particular SSD makes me believe it may even be simply necessary to leave the computer on for a while and then reboot and that will bring the SSD back.
    I don't have technical justification as to why it would not work, just that decades of troubleshooting have not given me a framework to understand WHY that would work. And I am the curious type. Of course turning things on and off and rebooting solve a great number of problems, sometimes (may most) we never know what is the root cause. I would be surprised if hardware enumeration on modern firmware takes 20 minutes, but as is often the case maybe I am missing a POV on the issue.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    I will confirm that the Crucial procedure does work in some cases. I had a Crucial SSD that was revived via this procedure. It later died and was replaced under warranty.

    Jerry

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    The method is on file, however feeble the index.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  10. #9
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    Amazingly enough, the 'fix' described in the link worked! As it says, I connected the power plug, unplugged the data plug, applied power for 20 minutes, removed power for 30 seconds, and repeated it once. Then I connected the data plug and lo and behold the drive was seen at bootup! However, once it booted to Windows (on the mechanical drive) Windows said it needed to run a chkdsk on the SSD. It appeared to find a lot of errors.
    So, I have a few questions:
    - Why did that fix work? Merely applying power to a device does not normally fix its operation. (It is an OCZ Agility3 drive)
    - Is the drive reliable enough to reinstate its use as a boot device, considering the large number of chkdsk errors?
    Many thanks to satrow for his suggestion.

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  12. #10
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Those drives were never reliable enough.

    Les taux de retour rapportés concernent les pièces vendues entre le 1er avril et le 1er octobre 2012, pour des retours crées avant avril 2013, soit 6 mois à 1 an de fonctionnement.
    The report is on hardware sold in a 1 year period, the returns are from a 6 month period on items 6 months to 1 year old.

    Note that these are returns to an etailer for whatever reason, other items might have been returned direct to the makers.

    Si on regarde les modèles avec un taux de retour supérieur à 5%, OCZ truste le classement :

    - 52,07% OCZ Octane SATA 2 128 Go
    - 45,26% OCZ Petrol 128 Go
    - 44,76% OCZ Octane SATA 2 64 Go
    - 40,57% OCZ Petrol 64 Go
    - 10,23% OCZ Agility 4 256 Go
    - 8,70% OCZ Octane SATA 3 256 Go
    - 7,41% OCZ Agility 4 64 Go
    - 6,85% OCZ Agility 4 128 Go
    - 6,59% OCZ Agility 3 90 Go
    - 5,56% OCZ Octane SATA 3 128 Go
    http://www.hardware.fr/articles/893-7/ssd.html

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