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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    Options for controlling updates in Windows 10




    TOP STORY


    Options for controlling updates in Windows 10


    By Susan Bradley

    Win10 Pro and Win10 Pro Version 1511 let everyone push off updates for weeks or months.

    Win10 Home users are mostly out of luck, but a couple of options will still let you take some updating control.

    The full text of this column is posted at http://windowssecrets.com/top-story/...in-windows-10/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    Thanks for this great information.

    Re your second to last paragraph (and I agree with your thoughts) but I suspect "control freaks" do not give options, sadly.

  3. #3
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    You mention having to pay $99 to upgrade from Win 10 Home to Pro, but there is another quick and relatively easy option if you have an unused Win 7, Win 8 or Win 8.1 Pro product key: http://www.zdnet.com/article/going-p...thout-hassles/

    Last night I used a Win 7 Ultimate product key from a machine I had retired and the whole process took about 15 minutes.

  4. #4
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    Right now, I've set things up following an earlier path that simply deferred upgrades. I'm assuming that this was for the 8 months mentioned in this article. Time to look.

    The biggest issue(s) with deferring upgrades is that many people want to defer them until they have had the time to determine what issues they may create. That time may vary but there does not seem to be a way to tell the Update process that it's OK to go ahead and upgrade now. Change the policy settings I guess. (Here's an opportunity for someone to make a little tool to do that)

    It would also appear that unless you just stop running updates completely, that sooner or later your software will be upgraded. What a user is supposed to do if an upgrade is known to break something that's important to them is anyone's guess.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  5. #5
    New Lounger
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    I think this whole furor over automatic updates in Win10 is way overblown. I service home and small business users, and I *always* recommend that they accept automatic updates in Win7, 8, or 10. Absolutely none of them have any conceivable idea of what an update even is, much less be able to distinguish a good one from a bad one. Deferring updates on the remote chance that one of them is harmful is much more dangerous than missing out on a critical security update.

    Unless you are running a full time IT shop with test machines where you will rigorously test every possible application with every new update that comes along, then deferring the regularly distributed updates is just asking for more trouble. But that's more business for me, I guess (:^)

  6. #6
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    Why in the heck have they removed the ability to pick and choose WHICH updates we want? I'm not talking about deferring updates, I mean rather the ability for choosing which updates not to install- There have been many instances of certain windows updates causing massive problems with people's computers- and savvy users would wait until windows updates were out for a bit before downloading them to make sure there were no problems with the updates- but now apparently we've been stripped of this ability? Even with the pro version?

    For instance, I'm running windows 7- and I got an update which put an 'upgrade now to windows 10' Nag screen on my computer- I found out which update did that- uninstalled that update, and hid it so hopefully it will not reinstall in the future

    With windows 10- We'll apparently have no choice over which updates we want- regardless of whether the update fubars our computers? And the best we can do is pay $100 more just to be able to delay the inevitable forced updates?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlamia View Post
    I think this whole furor over automatic updates in Win10 is way overblown. I service home and small business users, and I *always* recommend that they accept automatic updates in Win7, 8, or 10. Absolutely none of them have any conceivable idea of what an update even is, much less be able to distinguish a good one from a bad one. Deferring updates on the remote chance that one of them is harmful is much more dangerous than missing out on a critical security update.

    Unless you are running a full time IT shop with test machines where you will rigorously test every possible application with every new update that comes along, then deferring the regularly distributed updates is just asking for more trouble. But that's more business for me, I guess (:^)
    You seem to be oblivious to the fact that several Windows 10 updates seem to have had quite negative consequences for some users. Having always installed updates on my systems and haven't yet made the jump to Windows 10, I think Microsoft is making it look like its quality standards have lowered significantly (probably because they are said to have fired the people who did quality tests for their software), thus making it quite riskier, as I see it, to embark on an automatic updating strategy.
    This lack of quality control is actually more prejudicial to normal users, as power users will have multiple strategies in place to recover from any botched updates.

    From what I can see, this is not doing any good to Windows 10 popularity.
    Rui
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    R4

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    New Lounger
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    on the flipside, I have always, as long as I've owned my home computers, deferred updates- and have never had security issues as a result- and deferring the updates has saved me hassle when bad updates were discovered and later fixed The chance that a bad update beign put off until MS has time to fix it doesn't necessarily mean the user will experience the issues associated with not getting the update- ie- they won't immediately experience an attack on their computer if they choose not to install that one update and decide to wait till a fix is in- and really, many of us have several lines of defense to prevent attacks anyways- As I've said- I've never had an issue problem crop up from waiting to install a known bad update- and I've been computing for many years now

    While autoupdates are fine for the average user (UNLESS an update really fubars their computer), but for the rest of us we should be given the choice to update or not specific updates for the reasons mentioned in my opinion

    Good points Ruirib- windows 10 has been a disaster for some users- and very costly despite 'being free'

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    @ruirib, that's just hearsay, unless you have some specifics that you can cite. I'm no MS fanboy by a long shot, but I have *maybe* seen 1 instance of a bad update causing harm, and that was a long time ago. What I have seen is that a failed installation of one update will block further updates. I supposed you could call that a "negative consequence" but it didn't show up in application usage. Please have data to support your assertions.

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    I have a metered internet service, so is there a way that I can set Windows 10 Pro to download and install updates at a specific time like 2:00 am?

  11. #11
    jwoods
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    See this How-To Geeks article on metered connections...

    http://www.howtogeek.com/224471/how-...ading-updates/

  12. #12
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    When I go to Network & Internet, I do not see a setting for WI-FI. Only Data usage, VPN, Dial-up, Ethernet, Proxy

  13. #13
    jwoods
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlamia View Post
    @ruirib, that's just hearsay, unless you have some specifics that you can cite. I'm no MS fanboy by a long shot, but I have *maybe* seen 1 instance of a bad update causing harm, and that was a long time ago. What I have seen is that a failed installation of one update will block further updates. I supposed you could call that a "negative consequence" but it didn't show up in application usage. Please have data to support your assertions.
    All you need to do is click on the Windows 10 forum here and see the variety of issues people have had with Windows 10 installations and upgrades/updates.

    Auto updates in Windows 7/8/8.1 and Windows 10 are apples and oranges comparisons.

    In previous versions, it is possible to know what is being updated, so you have a starting point in troubleshooting.

    Case in point was the Woody on Windows article on InfoWorld yesterday regarding Cumulative Update 6 and Office 2016.

    Had there been detailed information available on what was in CU 6, it probably would have taken less than 5 minutes to see that the Office 2016 update was not included.

    That would have saved Ed Bott 4 hours of testing...and saved Woody and Infoworld (and 2 other sites that followed Infoworld's lead) the embarrasment of a retraction because they relied on reports from the field, and didn't do 4 hours of testing.

    The concept of a "set it and forget it" approach to upgrades and updates looks better on paper than in actual practice.

  14. #14
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    wlamia: I agree 100%. I have always accepted updates because I didn't want to miss anything important. I know I have been lucky that I haven't had an update cause a problem, but I haven't. I have had customers who refused updates and they have had problems. Unless you are really good at IT work, you wouldn't know what half the updates even do, let alone decide which ones are important.
    Last edited by G.Kruger; 2015-12-24 at 16:26.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    What a user is supposed to do if an upgrade is known to break something that's important to them is anyone's guess.
    I think at this late stage it goes without saying that one needs to have both their data and OS backed up independently.

    That goes for ANY operating system on ANY computer system, be it Linux, MS, or Apple, otherwise you're just looking for future headache.
    If you don't have a well thought out backup and recovery regimen then your in the realm of amateurishness.

    There's no excuse folks, get on it.

    PS
    If you're on a metered connection or you have a very limited bandwidth there are things that one
    can easily do about it;

    How to Uninstall Windows 10s Built-in Apps (and How to Reinstall Them)
    Disable Windows 10 Spying - Privacy & Security
    https://www.safer-networking.org/spybot-anti-beacon/
    TweakHound: Windows 10 Privacy Settings

    http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...85#post1035285
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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