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  1. #1
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    Monitoring Windows 10 data generation/usage

    I have a very modest system and internet account, with data uploads and downloads limited to 8 GB per month, which was ample for my needs under Windows 7. The installation of Windows 10 on 9th December last took up 3 GB and the remaining 5 GB barely lasted to the end of the month. The daily rate was pretty much what it used to be. On the first two days of January, however, my internet provider's statistics showed that I had used 1.7 GB of uploads and downloads. On neither of those days had I carried out any unusual operations. From my reading of posts on this site, I am aware of MS trying to monitor and collect personal data and assume that this usage is related to this.

    For years, I have used Netlimiter Pro 3 to monitor usage on my machine and identify any processes which seemed to be operating outside their usual requirements. I consulted the Netlimiter people and they advised that only Netlimiter 4 would work on Windows 10. They also gave me comprehensive instructions for removing all of the information left behind in files and registry after uninstalling Netlimiter 3. In addition, they provided a link to a site from which I could download a program called msizap.exe which would facilitate the process. Unfortunately, according to Windows 10, I was not allowed to store it on my computer, because it was considered "dangerous".

    Can anyone help me to get around these naughty MS restrictions or indicate how I can monitor MS operations using Windows 10's own features?

  2. #2
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    You can set a data limit.
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/w...our-data-limit

    [Edit] Seems you can only set a limit on a Windows mobile device. If you use WiFi you can set the connection as metered to limit large downloads, but not for Ethernet.
    Maybe Microsoft will pay for us all to have unlimited bandwidth!!

    cheers, Paul
    Last edited by Paul T; 2016-01-03 at 02:35.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim_from_oz View Post
    In addition, they provided a link to a site from which I could download a program called msizap.exe which would facilitate the process. Unfortunately, according to Windows 10, I was not allowed to store it on my computer, because it was considered "dangerous".

    Can anyone help me to get around these naughty MS restrictions or indicate how I can monitor MS operations using Windows 10's own features?
    When you get the warning, "MsiZap.exe is unsafe to download and was blocked by SmartScreen Filter", click the "View downloads" button.
    Then right-click the latest entry and select, "Download unsafe file". Then "View downloads" again, right-click the entry and select, "Run anyway" *:


    Q. How can I download files reported as unsafe by SmartScreen Filter in Internet Explorer 10?

    A. Downloads reported as unsafe by SmartScreen can be downloaded by using the following steps:

    1.Copy the web address (URL) of the download or the page that hosts the download link.
    2.Open Internet Explorer 10 on the desktop.
    3.Paste the URL into the address bar and hit enter. If the URL was to the page hosting the download, click on the desired download link on that web page.
    4.When the SmartScreen block is shown, click View Downloads.
    5.In the IE10 Download Manager, right-click on the download and choose Download unsafe file.
    6.When the file download is complete, it can be launched by right-clicking on the item again and choosing Run anyway.


    SmartScreen Filter Frequently Asked Questions (same for IE11/Edge)


    * But If you need to run the program from the command line with parameters:

    Right-click the file in File Explorer and select Properties, then Unblock under the Security heading at the bottom of the General tab before Apply/OK.
    Last edited by BruceR; 2016-01-03 at 11:03.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    The typical default settings in Windows 10 WILL drain your bandwidth like a leaky faucet.
    This is true even when you go directly into the "all settings" section and turn everything you can find to the "disabled".

    The first thing you'll need to do is turn off the bandwidth leaks, only then should you start to think about
    limiting your bandwidth usage. W10 will use your internet connection to P2P updates to others.

    The next thing to do will be to ensure that none of the start screen apps are LIVE, turn them all off.
    (Right click>more>turn live tile off)

    Finally, lighten the load by getting rid of much of the built in Windows 10 start apps.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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  5. #5
    jwoods
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    You might take a look at Nirsoft's NetworkTrafficView tool...

    http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/network_traffic_view.html

  6. #6
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    You should try owning W10 with a 1 mbps internet connection !

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Wink

    Although Nirsoft's NetworkTrafficView says "works on any version of Windows, starting from Windows 2000 and up to Windows 7, including 64-bit systems.", NetworkTrafficView does work with Windows 10. You have to manually set the capture device and monitor method (and remember to use 'Run as administrator').

    Sysinternals' TCPView does exactly the same as NetworkTrafficView but configures itself automatically and doesn't need to be 'Run as administrator'. It also appears to respond quicker to new connections and, helpfully, flags them up in bright green (and in red when they close).

    The most telling difference whilst running them side by side on a Dell laptop running Windows 10 Build 1511 and using a wireless connection was that NetworkTrafficView showed 50 connections whilst TCPView showed 108. I finally realised that TCPView was showing unconnected endpoints and IPv6 traffic whilst NetworkTrafficView wasn't showing any IPv6 traffic (even though the filter to show IPv6 was on). Confusingly, there were some local ports shown as 'in use' by NetworkTrafficView that weren't shown in TCPView and vice versa. TCPView also appears to be far better at identifying the source process... by comparison, NetworkTrafficView just showed blanks.

    Worst, in my opinion, was when I reverse sorted both displays by Process ID (PID). Here's the result:
    comparison.png
    Click to enlarge

    To my mind, sorting by the highest - lowest PIDs should show nearly identical displays. However, NetworkTrafficView shows only 2 Firefox connections and none by ituneshelper.exe. This may be due to the capture method (I used the option for Raw Sockets rather than adding WinPCap or another network monitor driver) but, for a straight out-of-the-box comparison, I have more initial confidence in TCPView.

    Don't get me wrong... I love Nir Sofer's utilities. I may be able to get better results from NetworkTrafficView by tinkering with it. The thing is, I'm no network expert and I don't want to have to tinker... I just want the best and most accurate display possible with the minimum of fuss.

    Hope this helps...

    Edit: I have no idea how the emoticon appeared in the post header.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Rick Corbett For This Useful Post:

    BruceR (2016-01-07)

  9. #8
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    Hello, again, colleagues all!
    Since my experiences with Windows 10 reported here, things have been more or less OK, except that some of the downloads and uploads seemed quite a bit bigger than I remembered from my Windows 7 days. However, a couple of recent incidents have raised some concerns. My internet service provider (Telstra.com) monitors my free and metered data usage on a daily basis. I also use Netlimiter4 to look at data flows as they occur (more or less). Since January this year, there has been one major update, with both my monitoring programs showing a download of about 600 Mbytes. However, on 25th March, my Telstra report showed an UPLOAD of 1.1 Gbytes, which did not appear on my Netlimiter4 report. Netlimiter is turned on when the computer is started up and runs continuously until shutdown. I assume the upload, like the updates, took place after the public bits of Windows 10 were shut down, but before the power was turned off. Does Microsoft keep any records of its interactions with individual users so that we can get some historical info on what they are doing with our systems? I am very relieved that I rejected Microsoft's wish that I use my Microsoft password for Windows 10!

  10. #9
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    You should check how updates are delivered. Go to Settings | Update & security | Windows Update | Advanced Options | Choose how updates are delivered. With a small data allowance you definitely do not want to share over the Internet. If you only have one PC on your home network turn Updates from more than one place OFF.

    Joe

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