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  1. #1
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    How much usable space on WD My Book 4TB external hard drive?

    Finally got around to using the two WD My Book 4 TB External Hard Drives I previously purchased.

    I first formatted both to remove the WD Software that comes on each drive.

    That resulted in leaving the drives with 306 MB Used Space & 3.63 TB of Free Space.

    Not being happy with 0.37 TB of unusable space, I further cleaned, initialized, & formatted each drive using cmd.

    That resulted in only releasing about 10 MB of more Free Space.

    But, when I attached each drive to create a Macrium Reflect Free System Image (once each on each drive), the 296 MB Used Space reverted to the 307 MB Used Space.

    I do understand that I will never get a full 4 TB use out of each drive.
    But isn't 0.37 TB of unusable space a tad high?

    Yes, I am anal about such things.

  2. #2
    jwoods
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    Download and run the free version of MiniTool Parition Wizard...

    http://www.partitionwizard.com/free-...n-manager.html

    Right-click on each line-item partition entry and select Explore, and you can see the details of the files, and their sizes.
    Last edited by jwoods; 2016-01-09 at 17:36. Reason: Added Explore instructions.

  3. #3
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    You mean I canNOT do that in Windows 8.1 Pro?

  4. #4
    jwoods
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevenXXXX View Post
    You mean I canNOT do that in Windows 8.1 Pro?
    If you want to use Diskpart...

    I think MPW is easier.

  5. #5
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    Here's the math on what a manufacturer calls 4 TB. They mean 4,000,000,000,000 bytes.

    The math to get what Windows calls it in terabytes (TB) is 4,000,000,000,000/1024/1024/1024/1024 = 3.64 TB

    Does that give you a little more favorable comparison?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwoods View Post
    If you want to use Diskpart...

    I think MPW is easier.
    I did use Diskpart

    Other than MPW being easier, would I not have gotten the same results?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurlIves View Post
    Here's the math on what a manufacturer calls 4 TB. They mean 4,000,000,000,000 bytes.

    The math to get what Windows calls it in terabytes (TB) is 4,000,000,000,000/1024/1024/1024/1024 = 3.64 TB

    Does that give you a little more favorable comparison?
    I knew all of that & I am not trying to be hardheaded here, but why show 3.63 TB Free & the other .37 TB as "Used".
    Why just not show that the Total Capacity is only 3.63 TB out of 4 TB & all of that is Free?

    All of this is probably inconsequential as I will probably never come close to using even the 3.63 TB.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevenXXXX View Post
    I knew all of that & I am not trying to be hardheaded here, but why show 3.63 TB Free & the other .37 TB as "Used".
    Why just not show that the Total Capacity is only 3.63 TB out of 4 TB & all of that is Free?

    All of this is probably inconsequential as I will probably never come close to using even the 3.63 TB.
    Is it 0.37 TB used or only 307 MB used? Those are quite different numbers. 307 MB is only 0.0003 TB. There is no other 0.37 TB as far as Windows is concerned - it's only 3.64 TB available, even if no space is used. Windows only will show 3.64 TB max, or 3725.3 GB max, no matter what you do with it. There IS NO 0.37 TB of used space to be had in your case.
    Last edited by BurlIves; 2016-01-09 at 19:03. Reason: missing a 0

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurlIves View Post
    Is it 0.37 TB used or only 307 MB used? Those are quite different numbers. 307 MB is only 0.0003 TB. There is no other 0.37 TB as far as Windows is concerned - it's only 3.64 TB available, even if no space is used. Windows only will show 3.64 TB max, or 3725.3 GB max, no matter what you do with it. There IS NO 0.37 TB of used space to be had in your case.
    It does show 307 MB used.

    The 0.37 TB is only the difference between 4 TB & the 3.63 TB shown as Free Space.

  10. #10
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    That .37 is called overhead, and the guy with the Ph.D. gets to set the value format, not us.
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevenXXXX View Post
    It does show 307 MB used.

    The 0.37 TB is only the difference between 4 TB & the 3.63 TB shown as Free Space.
    OK, so Windows displays only 4.00 - 0.37 = 3.63 TB of free space which, after accounting for overhead, = 4,000,000,000,000/1024/1024/1024/1024

    I'm sorry I don't seem to be answering your question and that the PhD has taken away your 0.36 TB due to his accounting format (which contradicts the manufacturer's) plus his 0.01 TB of overhead.

    Good luck in your quest.

  12. #12
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    Don't blame the PhD.

    Drive manufacturers rate disk space using the decimal system, so from a hardware engineering point-of-view 1 KiloByte (KB) = 1,000 Bytes, 1 MegaByte (MB) = 1,000 KBs, 1 GigaByte (GB) = 1,000 MBs, and 1 TeraByte (TB) = 1,000 GBs.

    But computer software uses the binary system because the smallest possible value is a "bit" which is most often expressed as either a 0 or a 1 (a "bit" has either no electromagnetic charge [0] or a positive electromagnetic charge [1]).

    It has long been agreed that 8 bits = 1 Byte, which is an average due to the different number of bits required to store different datatypes (boolean, numeric, string, etc.).

    The binary system runs 2 / 4 / 8 / 16 / 32 / 64 / 128 / 256 / 512 / 1,024 etc. so 1KB = 1,024 Bytes, 1MB = 1,024KB, 1GB = 1,024MB, and 1TB = 1,024GB.
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevenXXXX View Post
    Finally got around to using the two WD My Book 4 TB External Hard Drives I previously purchased.

    I first formatted both to remove the WD Software that comes on each drive.

    That resulted in leaving the drives with 306 MB Used Space & 3.63 TB of Free Space.

    Not being happy with 0.37 TB of unusable space, I further cleaned, initialized, & formatted each drive using cmd.

    That resulted in only releasing about 10 MB of more Free Space.

    But, when I attached each drive to create a Macrium Reflect Free System Image (once each on each drive), the 296 MB Used Space reverted to the 307 MB Used Space.

    I do understand that I will never get a full 4 TB use out of each drive.
    But isn't 0.37 TB of unusable space a tad high?

    Yes, I am anal about such things.
    The bigger the size of the drive, the bigger the difference will be between the actual storage value in decimal (used by drive manufacturers) and the storage value calculated through the use of the binary system, by the operating system. Sadly, storage manufacturers chose a measurement system that actually fools anyone who is not familiarized with how they measure the storage offered by their drives.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Don't blame the PhD.

    Drive manufacturers rate disk space using the decimal system, so from a hardware engineering point-of-view 1 KiloByte (KB) = 1,000 Bytes, 1 MegaByte (MB) = 1,000 KBs, 1 GigaByte (GB) = 1,000 MBs, and 1 TeraByte (TB) = 1,000 GBs.

    But computer software uses the binary system because the smallest possible value is a "bit" which is most often expressed as either a 0 or a 1 (a "bit" has either no electromagnetic charge [0] or a positive electromagnetic charge [1]).

    It has long been agreed that 8 bits = 1 Byte, which is an average due to the different number of bits required to store different datatypes (boolean, numeric, string, etc.).

    The binary system runs 2 / 4 / 8 / 16 / 32 / 64 / 128 / 256 / 512 / 1,024 etc. so 1KB = 1,024 Bytes, 1MB = 1,024KB, 1GB = 1,024MB, and 1TB = 1,024GB.
    Is there an echo in here? Just kidding!

    Obviously, you've taken the background of my explanation to OP into more depth and I hope that will better serve their publicly avowed anality.

    I think what may ultimately satisfy OP's quest is to go out and purchase a drive labeled by the manufacturer to have a capacity of 4.398 TB (plus whatever is taken in "overhead", of course).... Nah, that would probably only make things worse. Never Mind.
    Last edited by BurlIves; 2016-01-09 at 22:16.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurlIves View Post
    Is there an echo in here? Just kidding!

    Obviously, you've taken the background of my explanation to OP into more depth and I hope that will better serve their publicly avowed anality.

    I think what may ultimately satisfy OP's quest is to go out and purchase a drive labeled by the manufacturer to have a capacity of 4.398 TB (plus whatever is taken in "overhead", of course).... Nah, that would probably only make things worse. Never Mind.
    Now, if you were really Burl Ives, I might take your insult a little better.

    But, since he is dead, and you are not he, I don't

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