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  1. #1
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    Excel VBA Code Obfuscator

    This is hopefully the final follow-up to my prior message, Prevent Transfer of Excel Workbook. (http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...Excel-Workbook) Once again RetiredGeek came through and was of tremendous help -- thanks one more time. Nevertheless, for a workbook that is going to used as this one will it's been determined that more protection is needed than is afforded by relatively easily crackable built-in functionality like VBA code protection and xlVeryHidden worksheets. It's primary purpose is to avoid theft, but certainly preventing any code or worksheet tampering (intentional or not) is a plus as well.

    I'm asking for guidance in the selection of an Obfuscator for Excel VBA Code. Naturally I'll answer any questions that will assist any of you in coming up with recommendations.

    Thanks so much for your help.
    Last edited by macropod; 2016-01-26 at 04:24. Reason: Added link to previous thread

  2. #2
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    Rather than go to those lengths I'd use a long and complex password, then test it with one of the many Excel cracking tools.
    If you really want code obfuscation try this OzGrid program.
    Or this one.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
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    Cracking Worksheet protection passwords and VBA project passwords is a trivial exercise. The resources to do so are easily found on the web. If you're that concerned about protecting your intellectual property, consider using a workbook compiler - there's a number of them out there.

    The OzGrid obfuscator is a toy, IMHO. A moment studying the 'obfuscated' code example on their web page reveals that a simple series of Find/Replace operations would clean it up nicely. There's plenty of free code-formatters out there that would fix the indenting too, so the re-processed code would end up not much different in appearance to the original.
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

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