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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Exclusion Dictionaries, Word 2010

    In Word I have built an extensive exclusion dictionary over the past decade or so. The words in my exclusion dictionary list are words that are spelled correctly but are usually not used in my field.

    For instance, our papers may refer to an axle (the pin on which a wheel revolves) but would rarely make reference to an axel (a figure skating jump). Still, sometimes “axel” slips into a document, when “axle” is meant. My exclusion dictionary flags “axel” for me during a routine Spellcheck.

    But sometimes I run Spellcheck on newly scanned documents, while proofing them for typos caused by the optical character recognition software. We (here) call these “scannos.”

    My regular exclusion dictionary is used by many typists in my organization, but not many of those folks need also to have scannos flagged by Spellcheck. For instance, “hut” is a common scanno for “but,” but most typists wouldn’t need Spellcheck to stop on “hut.” (Just me, sigh.)

    So I would like to have two English-US exclusion dictionaries, one just for scannos, and the other for more ordinary words.

    And I would like to have both of these dictionaries “running” at the same time, on my computer; others in the company wouldn’t need both.

    Do any of you know how to do that? Build and use two English-US exclusion dictionaries at once? It’d involve an exclusion dictionary file-naming strategy, I would imagine.

  2. #2
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    I'm not answering your question directly, but aiming at the same goal.

    Why not put the common mis-spellings of words from your "exclusion dictionary" into the AutoCorrect list so they are corrected as you type ? It is easy to share the AutoCorrect list between PCs - https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/.../ff956104.aspx

    HTH

  3. #3
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    Thanks! And ya, I do put a lot of things in autocorrect – I love autocorrect – but there are lots of words that are correctly spelled but are still incorrect in some contexts.

    Like I don’t want to always autocorrect “conducive” into “conductive,” for instance. My department (Word Processing) works with papers coming from a few dozen authors who aren’t professional typists (they’re engineers and lawyers), and part of our job is to find and fix the writers’ typos.

    Like when the writer typed bowl, but meant bowel, or bread but meant break, or chamber but meant camber (or vice versa). There’s entities vs. entitles, the classics fist–first and host–hose, fluorescent and florescent, forth and froth, hermetic and hermitic, axle (like in a vehicle) and axel (a figure skating jump) – all commonly used (or rarely, so the spelling isn't familiar). Best not put them into autocorrect, I think.

    Some of these close-but-no-cigar words are pretty funny, so building an exclusion dictionary is entertaining – I highly recommend it. We’ve caught molecular bacon probes (beacon), FIG. 1 and FIB. 2, brining the action (bringing), sandwiched between two lawyers of dielectric material (layers), and so on. I need both “lawyers” and “layers” to be allowed, sigh – can’t put either one into autocorrect.

    With our hand-built exclusion dictionary in place, Spellcheck helps us spot these correct but still wrong words. And for me it seems like it would be useful to have one exclusion dictionary for scannos and one for typos.

    Oh well – the solution we have, which works just fine, is that, since each user can modify his or her own exclusion dictionary, they can start with my very inclusive exclusion list and modify it to fit their own needs.

    But if anyone ever figures out how to have two ENGLISH-US exclusion dictionaries in use at the same time, please let me know!
    Last edited by JudyL; 2016-01-29 at 21:15.

  4. #4
    5 Star Lounger
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    I understand.

    Probably less expensive to give them typing and/or English lessons than developing something specific - correcting grammar (or suggesting corrections) by machine has never really been satisfactorily accomplished

    It has been said that a machine might be able to do that if it can properly understand the meaning of each of the following two sentences:

    Time flies like an arrow
    Fruit flies like a banana

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  6. #5
    Silver Lounger Charles Kenyon's Avatar
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    I put some things in mine like form and from. I simply put up with some things which are correctly spelled being flagged. I go for ones that I tend to miss when proofing my own work.

    P.S. Those two sentences are a quotation from the great Groucho Marx.
    Charles Kyle Kenyon
    Madison, Wisconsin

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    Quote Originally Posted by JudyL View Post
    Like when the writer typed bowl, but meant bowel, or bread but meant break, or chamber but meant camber (or vice versa). There’s entities vs. entitles, the classics fist–first and host–hose, fluorescent and florescent, forth and froth, hermetic and hermitic, axle (like in a vehicle) and axel (a figure skating jump) – all commonly used (or rarely, so the spelling isn't familiar). Best not put them into autocorrect, I think.

    Some of these close-but-no-cigar words are pretty funny, so building an exclusion dictionary is entertaining – I highly recommend it. We’ve caught molecular bacon probes (beacon), FIG. 1 and FIB. 2, brining the action (bringing), sandwiched between two lawyers of dielectric material (layers), and so on. I need both “lawyers” and “layers” to be allowed, sigh – can’t put either one into autocorrect.
    Unfortunately our PCs are not yet able to always correctly interpret what the user has in mind. Spell checkers are just that - they check your spelling. They cannot reach out and query what a writer really wanted to say - we still need human proofreaders for that.

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    Charles Kenyon (2016-02-02)

  10. #7
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    We may be drifting off-topic but:

    "The saying is sometimes attributed to Groucho Marx, but according to The Yale Book of Quotations there is no reason to believe Groucho actually said this. Instead, it traces the quote to a 1982 post on the Usenet group net.jokes"

    More here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_f..._like_a_banana

  11. #8
    Silver Lounger Charles Kenyon's Avatar
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    Definitely drifting...

    I was delighted to see the Wiki page.
    I saw the attribution in a HyperCard Quotations stack on my Mac II around 1988. I can certainly hear Groucho saying it, but that does not mean I ever heard him say it. It sounds like one of his quips on You Bet Your Life.
    Charles Kyle Kenyon
    Madison, Wisconsin

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    Cross-posted at: http://www.eileenslounge.com/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=22338

    JudyL: Please read our policy on Cross-Posting in rule #14 - http://windowssecrets.com/forums/faq...n#crossposting
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  13. #10
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    Okay, thanks -- didn't know that!

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