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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger Vincenzo's Avatar
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    Windows System Image

    On a friend's computer we have two system images that have been made. One is in the root of a partition on the internal hard drive. The second, newer image, is in the root of an external hard drive. If we boot from a Windows Recovery drive and tell it we want to restore an image, will it give us the option to choose which of these images we want to restore from? Or will it only offer one of them?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I can't see how it can use an image on the drive you are recovering, assuming it restores from scratch. Why don't you test it and let us know?

    The alternative is to use a free 3rd party backup program to create and restore images.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
    5 Star Lounger Vincenzo's Avatar
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    I guess I wasn't clear, the image that's on the internal drive is on a 2nd partition on the drive.

    Doing image restores from one partition to another on the same drive is no problem, I do it all the time. But it always wants to see the WindowsImageBackup folder in the root of the drive, does not seem to have the ability to let you browse to find the image you want to recover, like other programs like Macrium do.

    For this computer, we have the two different images I mentioned, not sure which one I want to restore, and not sure how to make Windows Image Recovery utilize the one that I decide on.

    So I am wondering if I want to use the image on the external hard drive, am I going to need to delete or rename the WindowsImageBackup folder on the internal drive, before it will allow me to use the WindowsImageBackup on the external drive.

    I am helping a friend remotely, so it is difficult for me to test the various options.

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    I believe it will use the latest one created.

    But, since you are imaging to 2 different drives, I am not sure about that.

    You can read the article below Re Storing multiple images on the same drive to see whether you can glean any useful information from it.

    I believe you can use the information therein to do exactly what you want.

    http://windowssecrets.com/langalist-...system-images/
    Last edited by StevenXXXX; 2016-02-10 at 14:58.

  5. #5
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    If you have room on the external drive, copy the image from partition 2 to external. Copy external image to partition 2.

    cheers, Paul

  6. #6
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Advise is difficult, when you don't say what backup program you're using and how you're running it. Eh?

    If the Backup program is ON the drive/partition that you're backing up then you're breaking the cardinal rule* of Good Backups.

    * For safety, efficiency and prudence, the Backup program you're using "MUST NOT BE ON THE DRIVE YOU'RE BACKING UP"

    Because, when that drive crashes and goes up in a puff of smoke, you've just lost your Restore Program.

    So think about doing your backups like this: (by the numbers)

    1. Make sure your backup/restore program is on a removable and bootable media, like a flash drive or CD. NOT on the main drive.

    2. Backups should include everything on the C: partition, including the boot sector. NOT all backup programs will include the Boot Sector.

    3. Use compression of the Backup Image File, if your backup program includes the compression option. That saves space on the storage drive and allows you to save more backups.

    4. If you can unplug your backup storage drive from the PC. that greatly increases the Safety of your backups. Also storing your backup drive in a fireproof location, is wise.

    5. If at all possible, use multiple backup drives and alternate them, from week to week.
    Yes, do C: drive backups at least once a week, to maintain the best OS and Data integrity.

    I'm not saying this off the top of my head.... I've been setting up hard drive backup schemes for Banks, Businesses and individuals, including myself, for over 35 years.

    It's not Rocket Science, but the devil is definitely in the details.
    If your Backup program cannot do what I've outlined here, then it's time to get a new program.
    I have been using GHOST for my backup program since 1997. I'm currently using Ghost 11.5, which runs in DOS, from a DOS Boot disk, and will back up any OS from 98 to W-10, 32bit or 64 bit, even Linux or Windows Server.

    Good Luck,
    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  7. #7
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    "...If the Backup program is ON the drive/partition that you're backing up then you're breaking the cardinal rule* of Good Backups..." Dr.Who
    Exception: If one is using Macrium Reflect, residing on OS C, to make backups, one must make the usb boot or dvd boot Macrium Reflect very very early on, in order to be able to make restores.
    Last edited by RolandJS; 2016-02-11 at 13:03.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  8. #8
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Moving your imaging to a 3rd party application is what you need to do.
    Windows image I find to be buggy and unreliable. Not to mention that it's arduous to change storage locations
    and reliably find where your restore image is located.

    *Suggest 3rd party image app like Macrium, or some other.
    *Creating the image to both internal drive and external drive. External especially if you use a different partition on the SAME drive.
    *TEST your software and setup by physically restoring an image that was just created.
    (place a text file on the desktop just prior to restoring, it should disappear when the restore is completed)
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  9. #9
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    "...2. Backups should include everything on the C: partition, including the boot sector. NOT all backup programs will include the Boot Sector..." Dr. Who
    Exception: Macrium Reflect can make full-image of factory restore partition, System Reserved partition, and OS partition as separate full-images, which is what I recommend.When I restore OS C, I usually do not need to reDo SysRes partition. Addendum: Some Windows 7 installations make a boot sector=System Reserved partition, and some installations do not, which means the boot sector is definitely part and parcel of OS C partition.
    Last edited by RolandJS; 2016-02-11 at 13:07.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWho View Post
    1. Make sure your backup/restore program is on a removable and bootable media, like a flash drive or CD. NOT on the main drive.

    2. Backups should include everything on the C: partition, including the boot sector. NOT all backup programs will include the Boot Sector.
    Modern backup programs should be installed on C: and run from within Windows as that's how they are designed to work. They also allow you to create recovery media so you can boot a broken Windows installation.

    Modern backup programs make an image which includes everything you need to recover from hard disk failure. They also allow you to recover your OS to new hardware when your motherboard dies.

    Ghost was great, but it's showing it's age and should be consigned to history, especially when free apps, like Aomei Backupper, will do all of the above.

    cheers, Paul

  11. #11
    5 Star Lounger Vincenzo's Avatar
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    Thanks to all for the info.

    I am going to start using Macrium when I need to save multiple images. Yes, it seems too hard with Windows Image to juggle images on multiple devices, from multiple dates.

    Thanks

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