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  1. #1
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    diskmgmt.msc problems

    I have 38 gigs free on my C: drive and I would like to shrink my hard drive to create a new partition but diskmgmt.msc is only allowing a maximum shrink of 3gigs out of the 38. I can't find a solution?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    calistar,

    Welcome to the Lounge as a New Poster!

    Is your C: drive located on a SSD? If so SSD's need at least 20% free space to work efficiently!

    Personally, I wouldn't use Disk Management to accomplish this task. I prefer one of the excellent free tools avaliable like Partition Wizard Mini-Tool Free or EaseUS Partition Master Free.

    And as always don't use either until you have a full Image backup of your drive along with tested boot media to run the restore if needed!

    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    If so SSD's need at least 20% free space to work efficiently
    References please.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    The probable reason for the inability to shrink a C: partition with Disk Management is that a system file has been written near the top of the file space. If it's a restore point in System Volume Information you could take your life in your hands by deleting all system restore points and trying again. Some of the third-party defragment programs will identify files at particular locations.

    Retired Geek's suggestion for alternative shrinkers may well be simpler - I have also used Easeus very successfully.
    BATcher

    "The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you can never know if they are genuine."
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  5. #5
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Paul,

    How about this How-to-Geek article. HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

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  6. #6
    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Just curious, what is your reason for wanting to partition your C drive?
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  7. #7
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    As silly as this sounds, it also depends upon which "end" of the SoonToBeShrunk partition is going to be affected; Earlier, after defragging, making sure nothing was on the "back end," I shrunk my OS partition from the "back end," not the "beginning end."
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    How about this How-to-Geek article
    The referenced AnandTech test shows that the sustained performance falls with less free space, but at low free space levels, 12%, performance is stable for about 70 seconds. In real world use that is more than good enough for most users, IMO. If you are a heavy IO user then a high performance drive with more free space will give best results.

    cheers, Paul

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