Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    Hi All,
    I have a couple of computers with both an ethernet card as well as a firewire card. XP sees the Firewire card as a potential network item-and attaches the file sharing services, protocols etc to it. I don't have a firewire network-it is only the ethernet set up to network. Should I uncheck all those protocols and services from the firewire card?
    Also-I am using a hub-vs a router. I don't know a lot about networks-learning by the seat of my pants as it were-and I wonder what the reasons might be for either-if it might help my setup to use a router rather than the hub. My network seemed to be a lot faster a year ago-had 5 or 6 computers on it at the time (OSes were 95, 98, 98SE, and 2000). Now I have 9 computers (an 8 port hub with a 4 port uplinked to the 8port) and 2 of the systems run ME while the others are all running XP. When clicking on folders on other computers it can result in pretty slow reads most of the time-but not always. And I can't see a good reason for the variable speed.
    thanks,
    Lori

  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    7,089
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    Part 1: Disable ununused protocols on everything, not just the firewire card. You should only need TCP/IP. If you have IPX/SPX ena bled, for example, you will slow the network down dramatically because that protocol (aside from being old and worn out) is very busy. It adds a lot of useless traffic to your network.

    You should be OK with the hub, for one, they're cheaper. Routers are a bit more to wrestle with, and most likely would not help you much. They're better in places where you have many machines, lots of data going, and you need accurate switching between network domains and such.

    There is a known problem with Windows 2000 checking scheduled tasks on remote computers on the network that will slow down browse times between machines. I believe the problem exists under XP as well. Here is the information on *that* little gem from Redmond:

    The usual applies about editing your registry - meaning it's at your own risk.

    Step 1. In Windows 2000, click Start, Run, type regedt32, and click OK.

    Step 2. In the Registry Editor, navigate to the following branch: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/Software/Microsoft/Windows/Current Version/Explorer/RemoteComputer/NameSpace

    Step 3. Under that branch, select the key {D6277990-4C6A-11CF-8D87-00AA0060F5BF}. This is the key that instructs Windows Explorer to search for Scheduled Tasks. Pull down the Registry menu and click Save Key to back up this value. Name the output file, say, ScheduledTaks.reg, and you can easily restore the key if necessary.

    Step 4. Delete the key and close the Registry Editor.

    This change takes effect immediately and doesn't require a reboot, so you can determine how much it speeds up the process.

    Good luck!!
    -Mark

  3. #3
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    I have NetBeui on all the systems. No IPX/SPX. Also TCP/IP. On the ME systems I have TCP/IP UN checked for file sharing-I don't think I can do that anywhere in XP-it seems to allow the setting of DNS addresses etc-but no restriction as to the internal network. I have one computer that runs WinProxy4 to allow everyone in the house the ability to go online. That system doesn't seem robust enough to be switched to XP-maybe I'm wrong on this. It's a 300mhz with 90mbRAM and is used very little other than handling the internet access requests. The other systems are an old 233 laptop, 400, 550, 950, 1ghz...and I think there is a 1.3ghz on there at times. Anyway-the traffic on the network doesn't appear to be particularly heavy. Just some simple file sharing going on, or printing to the printer. The kids play games across the network sometimes-I discount any and all activity at that time-who knows what they are doing!!
    I have seen that interesting little registry entry about the scheduled tasks-weird!-and have deleted it from my machine, at least. Didn't make any difference that I could see
    Any suggestions as to tools for observing network connections, their speed etc-realizing that a lot of the stuff is zooming right over my head when they start talking packets etc. :-(
    lori

  4. #4
    Uranium Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    7,089
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    Lori,

    Are all the computers in the same workgroup? XP likes to set the default to MSHOME and all other versions of Windows defaulted to WORKGROUP (how original).

    One thing you could try is setting static IP addresses for each of the machines. Then, with that completed, you could add these to a HOSTS file, and copy the HOSTS file to each PC. That will prevent DNS lookups when the system queries a remote machine. I use the HOSTS file to block online ads from appearing, saving a little bit of time but more so to keep my wanderings on the net my business, so they are not covertly tracked. Whoops, let me put that soapbox away.

    At any rate, setting static IP addresses may alleviate some of the issues you face, and a commone HOSTS file can't hurt either. The problem with the HOSTS file is that if you change an IP address, you need to update this file across all the machines on your network.
    -Mark

  5. #5
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    Yes, they are all WorkGroup=WORKGROUP (Tho' I think I will triple check that...maybe one of them snuck by me)
    As for the hosts file-that's an interesrting suggestion. Hmmm. I do have static IPs on each computer (in the 90.0.0.1...10 range.) So where will I be placing this hosts file? I am at work at the moment on a 2000 box-the hosts file on this system is in system32driversetc. Will this be where it should be placed on an XP system? As well as an ME system? or a 98 system? And it's just a text file? named hosts. ?
    thanks,
    Lori

  6. #6
    Uranium Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    7,089
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    The quick, easy answer first: yes, HOSTS is a plain text file that you can edit with a text editor. Please don't use Word unless you want to go through extra effort to save it without formatting.

    The location of the HOSTS file is dependent upon the operating system's family. What I mean by that is all products in the 9x family - Windows 98, 98/98SE, and ME - the file location is the same....C:WINDOWS (change C: if necessary).

    For all NT-based operating systems, including NT 4.0, 2000, and XP, the location is as you found it at work: %sysetmroot%SYSTEM32DRIVERSETC.

    A note that you will need to be aware of: the HOSTS file has no extension. That means if you edit it in Notepad and save it, it will become HOSTS.TXT and will not work. To save it properly from notepad you must surround the file name in quotes: "HOSTS" or simply exit Notepad, telling it yes, save my changes when it asks.

    The format of the file is explained in HOSTS.SAM, which is a sample file you can use. It only resolves computer name to addresses - you cannot specify an IP address. As you look at the example, 127.0.0.1 is the local loopback address, meaning that anything with that specified will resolve to your local computer and go nowhere. For example:

    <pre>90.0.0.1 MyFirstComputer
    90.0.0.2 MySecondComputer
    # This line will prevent the ad server from wrecking my browing experience
    127.0.0.1 ads.somewebsite.com</pre>

    will work, whereas

    <pre>90.0.0.1 199.12.17.231</pre>

    Will not. This is because HOSTS is only referenced by the system when it has to look up a name to find the remote computer. Just like the Internet, computer names are friendly things that humans like us can remember instead of a string of numbers, since <A target="_blank" HREF=http://63.151.114.115>http://63.151.114.115/</A> will take you to the WOPR homepage too - but who wants to name their website something like that? <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15>
    -Mark

  7. #7
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    Mark,
    Very thorough and helpful answers-they are very much appreciated.
    I am not clear, however, on how your little bit of ad blocking works. 127.0.0.1 is the local card in a given computer-yes? I understand that to be the generic address...on all computers. Yes?
    What are you putting next to it in the HOSTS file? A *real* place? or a made-up place?
    Thanks,
    lori

  8. #8
    Uranium Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    7,089
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Network-Ethernet and Firewire

    Correct - 127.0.0.1 is the local machine. A dead-end street if you will. And it is a universal thing, for all IP capable networks.

    I've attached my HOSTS file so you can see how I do things - I add comments so that if something stops working, I can go back - after about a week (heavy Internet freak that I am) I remove the comments.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    -Mark

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •