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  1. #1
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    Win10 setup randomly runs the OS-install process


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    Win10 setup randomly runs the OS-install process


    By Fred Langa

    A reader successfully upgraded from Win8 to Win10; but now the Win10 bootup process sometimes reverts all the way back to the "Preparing Windows" upgrade step. Here's why and how to fix it. Plus: Why Malwarebytes sometimes blocks Skype, and a reader is deeply suspicious of Win10's "phone-home" background telemetry.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/langalist-plus/win10-setup-randomly-runs-the-os-install-process/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Tracey Capen; 2016-03-21 at 20:10.

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    This column also includes a section on "Win10's phone-home telemetry". It mentions that there are more then "60 separate privacy adjustments". It's difficult to tell if Fred considers this a good thing (as in you have a lot of fine control over the settings) or a bad thing (too many options is often worse than none).

    Personally, I come down on the side of too many choices. I'm not sure how long it would take to sort through all the choices and decide what to allow and what not to allow, but I'm pretty sure that most people will either do nothing or go through a few then give up or just ruthlessly shut off every thing they can find. There also no easy way to keep track of any new settings that get added or old settings changed.

    Of all the things that MS has done in Win10, this is probably the most annoying. I don't think that MS is spying on me, or collecting my passwords and credit card numbers, or anything nefarious. But the fact that they have done this as an opt-out rather than opt-in and have provided no simple way to say yes or no to everything makes me wonder if they don't want us to mess with these things or simply don't care that they are doing something that looks and smells like spying.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

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    Reupgrade problem Win 7 -> Win 10

    I have a different problem. I upgraded to Win 10, but had a tech issue where I had to restore my laptop with a disc image which had been created while still running Windows 7. Now, when i try to upgrade again to Win 10, a popup comes up saying "Please wait", and then vanishes after 2 seconds. No update ever happens. How do I get the upgrade to work again?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pfeldmann View Post
    I have a different problem. I upgraded to Win 10, but had a tech issue where I had to restore my laptop with a disc image which had been created while still running Windows 7. Now, when i try to upgrade again to Win 10, a popup comes up saying "Please wait", and then vanishes after 2 seconds. No update ever happens. How do I get the upgrade to work again?
    Use the Windows 10 media creation tool.

    Joe

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm
    I'm not sure how long it would take to sort through all the choices...
    I agree totally with what you've written and, yes, it does take a while to work your way down through all 63 adjustable settings under Privacy for a default install, all but 2 of which are On/Off toggles. Having said that, many of the settings can be switched off in one fell swoop by toggling a 'master' choice within each category.

    I've upgraded nearly a dozen laptops and PCs so far and have many more to do before July 29th. As a result I've gradually been automating the changes I make to each device, without having to resort to 3rd-party tools like Spybot AntiBeacon and/or O&O ShutUp10 (which I don't know exactly what they're doing under the bonnet).
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2016-03-23 at 15:27.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    I've upgraded nearly a dozen laptops and PCs so far and have many more to do before July 29th. As a result I've gradually been automating the changes I make to each device, ...
    Time for you to write a guide since you now qualify as the expert in the room.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

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    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm
    Time for you to write a guide since you now qualify as the expert in the room.
    ROFL... not at all. I didn't mean to come over as any type of expert. It's just that I find myself making the same personal changes time and time again, many of which can be carried out by using a simple .REG file (for toggling settings) or a .BAT file (for example, to amend settings for default services).

    IMO it would be impossible to write a useful guide as people's preferences are so individual.

    For example, I personally dislike Cortana searching the entire universe when all I'm doing is looking for a whatever locally... so I almost always change Cortana's behaviour to only carry out searches locally... so I have a .REG file that makes this change (and another .REG file that undoes the change).

    To give a specific example re: Privacy, I personally see no need to "Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future" so I have the following 2 .REG files, one to toggle this setting OFF and the other to turn it back on again.

    Code:
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    ;    Turn OFF "Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future"
    
    [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Input\TIPC]
    "Enabled"=dword:00000000
    Code:
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    ;    Turn ON "Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future"
    
    [-HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Input]
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2016-03-23 at 09:08. Reason: Added specific Privacy example

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    ROFL... not at all. I didn't mean to come over as any type of expert.
    I was being facetious. As you point out, with that many things to twiddle and fiddle with, it's tough to write some kind of guide and nearly impossible to make recommendations.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  9. #9
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    Not spying to "steal credit card ..." but spying to make much more money!

    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    This column also includes a section on "Win10's phone-home telemetry".... there are more then "60 separate privacy adjustments". It's difficult to tell if Fred considers this a good thing (as in you have a lot of fine control over the settings) or a bad thing (too many options is often worse than none) .... Personally, I come down on the side of too many choices.
    Graham,
    I am with you. Too many options too well distributed, that is hidden for the normal home user to get through - if the user finds them at all.

    I'm not sure how long it would take to sort through all the choices and decide what to allow and what not to allow, but I'm pretty sure that most people will either do nothing or go through a few then give up or just ruthlessly shut off every thing they can find.
    Again I agree, it would take way too long.
    But if I don't want this sort of MS engagement why is it ruthless if I turn it off? Irrespective what Microsoft's lawyers think and say about this the computer is my property and not Micro$oft's. I run it the way I deem best for me, period.
    There also no easy way to keep track of any new settings that get added or old settings changed.
    I beg to differ. Please look at SD Anti Beacon.
    This little baby even showed me that MS had installed additional new telemetry via Windows Update and then with the version 1511 "upgrade"; I just can't call that simple updating any more.

    Of all the things that MS has done in Win10, this is probably the most annoying.
    And again I agree.
    I don't think that MS is spying on me, or collecting my passwords and credit card numbers, or anything nefarious.
    Me neither.
    But the fact that they have done this as an opt-out rather than opt-in and have provided no simple way to say yes or no to everything makes me wonder if they don't want us to mess with these things or simply don't care that they are doing something that looks and smells like spying.
    They, MS, are/is so big that they don't need to care at all, IMO.

    Forgive me but I have to add a lengthy quote from my blog from October 2012 about Windows 8 (some inverted text added at end of quote):
    ... I have a vague idea what Artificial Intelligence programs can do when they scan my emails, my communications and correlate that with all the details I have had to tell Microsoft about myself to fill the tiles on the Modern UI with, for me, meaningful information.

    And Microsoft really tries quite obviously to coax me into using my age-old Hotmail account to log in. That would give them the unique ID to easily tie it all together.

    I believe I am usually fairly bland and somewhat straight headed but THIS is THE ONE ASPECT of Windows 8's Modern UI that fills me with a lot of trepidation.

    Apple has made an incredible fortune "having access" to all this information about their customers and as I see it Microsoft wants to bake themselves a similar pie, not only get a slice ( ...of this pie of advertising money).

    I do believe Windows 8 was a "test run" to see if the market would reject the above but we didn't. Windows 10 is not only a "similar pie", I think it is close to a masterpiece.

    I know MS since quite some time BEFORE we had MD-DOS and they have absolutely never given anything away, much less a completely new version of one of their flagship products.
    Eike J Heinze
    What I am about
    SE Wisconsin

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett
    yes, it does take a while to work your way down through all 63 adjustable settings under Privacy for a default install, all but 2 of which are On/Off toggles. Having said that, many of the settings can be switched off in one fell swoop by toggling a 'master' choice within each category.
    I was working my way through these settings when I found that there's probably more than 63 adjustable settings under Privacy. It's just that some appear to be hidden.

    For example, in the Background apps section of Privacy (in Settings), there's a list of 9 apps that can be toggled:

    w10_background_apps.png
    Click to enlarge

    I was checking the registry whilst toggling the settings for these and found that there's actually 16 background apps, not 9, shown in the corresponding BackgroundAccessApplications sub-key:

    w10_background_apps_registry.png
    Click to enlarge

    Not only that, the settings are per user, i.e. within HKEY_CURRENT_USER. There's no corresponding setting within HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE to turn the background apps off globally.

    Of course, the "more then "60 separate privacy adjustments"" mentioned in Fred Langa's column appears to only include the settings within the Privacy section of Settings. There's other privacy settings within Windows 10 which, strangely, aren't included within the Privacy section of Settings. For example, have a look at the excellent fix windows 10 list).

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