Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Need to initialize/format RAW drive

    A 500 GB HDD shows up in Disk management (Windows or Command prompt) as raw. Dispart allows to clean the drive and the raw designation disappears. But I am still unable to get the drive formatted. A search turned up only ads of disk repairers, no workable solutions. Aomei is also useless.
    Obviously the drive could be dead, but the BIOS SMART recognizes it as ok.
    Note: the drive is connected as internal, USB connections do not recognize it.

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    718
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 144 Times in 130 Posts
    Open Disk Manager, right click on the drive and select format. If it doesn't work, download Seatools for DOS and use it to test the drive.

    http://www.seagate.com/gb/en/support...ls-dos-master/

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Calimanco For This Useful Post:

    jrukendorfer (2016-03-31)

  4. #3
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,365
    Thanks
    232
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by jrukendorfer123@comcast.n View Post
    A 500 GB HDD shows up in Disk management (Windows or Command prompt) as raw. Dispart allows to clean the drive and the raw designation disappears. But I am still unable to get the drive formatted. A search turned up only ads of disk repairers, no workable solutions. Aomei is also useless.
    Obviously the drive could be dead, but the BIOS SMART recognizes it as ok.
    Note: the drive is connected as internal, USB connections do not recognize it.
    If you wiped the drive you will need to create a partition first. If some way you cleared the initial Initialization (I don't even know how this could be done) you will need to reinitialize it. Both options are available in disk manager.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to wavy For This Useful Post:

    jrukendorfer (2016-03-31)

  6. #4
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    965
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    I never did get to try this on a hard drive that had 2 RAW partitions but maybe you can find it helpful if it isn't too late
    How to Convert/Change RAW File System to NTFS without Data Loss
    http://www.easeus.com/resource/raw-f...em-to-ntfs.htm

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to cmptrgy For This Useful Post:

    jrukendorfer (2016-03-31)

  8. #5
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    965
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    Is your problem solved?

  9. #6
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    820
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 61 Times in 56 Posts
    Does the partition have drive letter? If not, give it one.

    Seriously, MiniTool Partition Wizard and corresponding tools from EaseUS and AOMEI can usually save the day if, as one post put it, it isn't already too late. The partition letter can be set in Windows Disk Management, or in any of those free partition management programs. It must have a drive letter to be properly used by the system. You will find another fairly recent thread in this forum ("Drive letters and names and such") that discusses it.

    Free partition recovery programs include Easeus Partition Recovery and MiniTool Partition Recovery, but there are numerous others.

    Data recovery software is another matter. Most vendors will offer a free version with a 1 GB recovery, but all in all it can be an expensive, time-consuming business.
    Recuva is popular freeware among users, along with offerings from the above vendors. Today’s Giveaway of the Day is Tenorshare Data Recovery Pro, said to be worth a hundred bucks (but on sale at the web site for fifty). Once in a while that source (GAOTD) has familiar and valuable freebies – a recent one was Zoner Photo Studio, but I’m wary of many of their offerings. Tenorshare appears to get favourable reviews but I haven't tried it myself.
    Last edited by dogberry; 2016-03-27 at 10:58. Reason: Provided links and more information

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to dogberry For This Useful Post:

    jrukendorfer (2016-03-31)

  11. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I am grateful for your comprehensive answer. Most of the programs I have tried and failed. I must conclude that the drive is dead.

  12. #8
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    820
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 61 Times in 56 Posts
    If you have the drive label exposed, you may need a magnifying glass, but it will have the ‘manufactured’ date on it. (Deciphering the date is up to you.) Drives normally have a one-year warranty (on the drive, not the data). The manufacturer of the drive, details of the model of which are also on the label, is the best source for information and fixes.

    I suggest you make yourself a Linux stick. It’s easy, you can get tons of information on the web, and you can post questions in the Non-Microsoft OSes forum of the Lounge as well as at Linux sites. You can’t see Linux from Windows, but you can explore Windows and hard drives comfortably from Linux, and Linux-on-a-stick (with relevant utilities) is widely used as a troubleshooting tool.

    Linux Mint and Ubuntu are two popular versions with graphic interfaces that make them easy for Windows users to adapt to, and you can create an 8 GB bootable flash drive or a regular DVD to run it from. Linux Mint (now at 17.3) would be my personal recommendation, since it comes equipped with a suite of applications that can have you up and running in no time.

    I doubt that your drive is dead. That it is seen as RAW means that it is seen; it doesn’t mean that it is dead.

  13. #9
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    965
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    "Dispart allows to clean the drive and the raw designation disappears. But I am still unable to get the drive formatted" This tells me the drive has been cleaned.
    I agree with dogberry and doubt that the drive is dead unless there is something we don't know about such as the RAW partition you mentioned is still formatted as RAW instead of NTFS.
    What is the make/model of your hard drive?

  14. #10
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    820
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 61 Times in 56 Posts
    I recommend MiniTool Partition Wizard, which is free. You will see an option to create a Bootable CD, which is also free. I recommend that you make one – whether it does you any good or not this time around, you may need it next time. You should never perform non-trivial operations on a drive when working from the drive itself. (That is the same reason for recommending a Linux flash drive or DVD.)

    Now boot from the disk you have made. (You don't have to worry about that so long as the 500 GB drive is not the boot drive and you have installed the utility on the boot drive.) Pick the disk you are worried about from the display. If it isn’t there then it may be dead. Be sure, as I noted before, that the partition you are looking at has a drive letter; if not, then (right click for dropdown) select ‘change letter’ and give it a letter. It has to be a letter that isn’t already taken.

    If the partition is wiped, then just format the silly thing, and be sure it has a drive letter. You are starting from scratch with it, but you still have a drive and it isn’t dead.

    More interestingly, perform a surface test (again available by right-click). This is where you can sit and watch paint dry for hours. If you get the initial screen filled with little squares that is a promising sign, and if you click ‘start now’ and the squares proceed to fill the screen (you don’t have to watch it all) then it means that the motor is running and the disk is being examined. If you have bad sectors they can probably be fixed, but at least the drive is running and you can see that it’s not dead.

    If the drive didn't show up at all, open the case to be sure your cables are connected.

  15. #11
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    820
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 61 Times in 56 Posts
    ...continued

    An even better way of watching paint dry is to defragment a drive. I use UltraDefrag, which was updated just over a week ago, and that will give you a similar array of squares but with a variety of colours, and as it works it relocates the squares, which is far more exciting to watch and offers better assurance that the drive is live. ‘Something’ is going on, that’s for sure.

    The MiniTool Partition Wizard CD is something I use a lot (I have more than one computer), and I used it yesterday for the first time to clone a boot drive, which it did very well. The only trick is to note that they call it ‘copy’; you have to go to the Help file to find the description of it as a clone operation.
    There are a lot of major operations that a user can perform with that free-to-home-users disk, and with its competitors’ disks as well.

  16. #12
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,365
    Thanks
    232
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    If the OP tried All of the s/w suggested and tried a different computer and cables, maybe he is right and it is toast.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  17. #13
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    965
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    @ David "If the OP tried All of the s/w suggested and tried a different computer and cables, maybe he is right and it is toast"
    --- Unfortunately I'm beginning to sense the same since everything seems to be failing

  18. #14
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    1,501
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 205 Times in 163 Posts
    There is one major advantage to being just plain OLD. My first OS was DOS 2.0 way back in the very early 80's.

    When I come up against a drive that's been snafued or one that I've inherited from who knows where and I want to certify it for use, I go back to my roots and DOS. Some years back I formatted a floppy disk on a Windows ME PC and put all the disk commands on it, with a Ansi Color menu.


    Booting up a PC with that disk I can run FDISK on a drive and remove any/all partitioning/formatting whether DOS, Windows, or even Linux.
    If the drive is running at all, I can usually re-partition it (just one part) and then run the DOS Format command on it.
    Why the DOS Format, you may ask...... well, because it's the one command, that I know of, that examines every sector on the drive, right out to the end of the drive, for it's ability to reliably hold data, as it formats it. Any sector that is deemed unreliable is blocked out and that sector goes into the Bad Sector list, stored at the beginning of the drive. This process can take a while on a large HD, but it's worth the time spent, to know that the drive can reliably hold data.

    With the drive partitioned and formatted, Windows can now see it and reformat it NTFS, if needed, for use in Windows.
    I've used this age old technique to recover and certify, old HD's and put them back into use.
    Believe it or not, I still have several Quantum HD's that I've re-certified for use, although there's not much use today for a 40GB hard drive, except maybe for a Data Backup drive. Eh?

    I guess what I'm getting at is that most all things are possible, , , it's just a matter of how you attack the problem.
    I also use EaseUs Partition Master for a lot of my HD maintenance jobs.

    Cheers Mates!
    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  19. #15
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    107
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Speaking of being old, I can recommend SpinRite. it will do amazing things for drives but you have to part with $89 to get it. I don't know whether it's worth the money because you can get a new 500gb drive (if any that small are still on the market) for less. But it's a thought.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •