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  1. #1
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    Question Roku and TV moved away from router. How best to boost signal?

    We have a DSL modem/router at one end of our house. Our bandwidth is low; max throughput is about 13 MB/s. When the TV and the ROKU were in that room, the ROKU worked fine and the DVRís Netflix app worked well also.
    Now the TV and the ROKU are at the other end of the house, where the Wi-Fi signal isnít that great. Which of these is the best option?

    1. Have the ISP install an additional modem in the (other) end of the house.
    2. Buy a Wi-Fi extender to put somewhere between the two.
    3. Use an Ethernet-over-power-line connection from the modem/router to the new TV room and attach a wireless router to it.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak View Post
    We have a DSL modem/router at one end of our house. Our bandwidth is low; max throughput is about 13 MB/s. When the TV and the ROKU were in that room, the ROKU worked fine and the DVRís Netflix app worked well also.
    Now the TV and the ROKU are at the other end of the house, where the Wi-Fi signal isnít that great. Which of these is the best option?

    1. Have the ISP install an additional modem in the (other) end of the house.
    2. Buy a Wi-Fi extender to put somewhere between the two.
    3. Use an Ethernet-over-power-line connection from the modem/router to the new TV room and attach a wireless router to it.

    Thanks
    1. In my area a second modem requires a second account [think more money].
    2. That probably would work but I'd get a much better Router, maybe with 3 or 4 antennas on it.
    3. Some folks have success with that but I've not worked with one yet.

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    Keffdoak (2016-04-01)

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    I would suggest moving your modem/router to a more central location. Not only would this help your TV and ROKU to get a better signal, but it would help all devices in the house to get a better signal.

    In case this would move the router away from a device (e.g. a desktop computer) which requires an Ethernet cable for connection, you could get a USB wifi adapter for that device. That's what I did for my desktop computer, and it works very well.

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    Keffdoak (2016-04-01)

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    You could try a WiFi repeater or a Powerline Ethernet.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

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    Thanks for the input.

    Our neighbor closest to the TV has Comcast broadband, and we get a very strong signal. I think I'll ask them if we can share. I doubt it would constrict their bandwidth. If they turn me down, I think I'll first try a repeater.

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    If it's a Comcast cable modem with WiFi, Comcast puts a "guest account" for Comcast subscribers. It's part of why they claim to have a huge "free" WiFi network. Technically, you don't have to ask anyone to use it

    http://wreg.com/2014/06/16/comcast-t...i-fi-hotspots/
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak View Post
    We have a DSL modem/router at one end of our house. Our bandwidth is low; max throughput is about 13 MB/s. When the TV and the ROKU were in that room, the ROKU worked fine and the DVR’s Netflix app worked well also.
    Now the TV and the ROKU are at the other end of the house, where the Wi-Fi signal isn’t that great. Which of these is the best option?

    1. Have the ISP install an additional modem in the (other) end of the house.
    2. Buy a Wi-Fi extender to put somewhere between the two.
    3. Use an Ethernet-over-power-line connection from the modem/router to the new TV room and attach a wireless router to it.

    Thanks
    This possible solution is a Powerline Wi-Fi extender which has two ethernet ports.
    http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/d...PA4220KIT.html
    I've used a kit like this with excellant results.
    Of course if you can use the neighbor's Wi-Fi then you souldn't need this.

    RockE

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  13. #8
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    Thanks. Sounds like a good option.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak View Post
    .... Which of these is the best option?
    1. Have the ISP install an additional modem in the (other) end of the house.
    2. Buy a Wi-Fi extender to put somewhere between the two.
    3. Use an Ethernet-over-power-line connection from the modem/router to the new TV room and attach a wireless router to it.

    Thanks
    1. nope
    2. nah
    3. powerline or moCA adapter (latter if you have cable TV coaxial throughout home) best

  15. #10
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    Roku and TV moved. How best to boost the Wi-Fi signal?

    Quote Originally Posted by RockE View Post
    This possible solution is a Powerline Wi-Fi extender which has two ethernet ports.
    http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/d...PA4220KIT.html
    I've used a kit like this with excellant results.
    Of course if you can use the neighbor's Wi-Fi then you souldn't need this.

    RockE
    I went with this suggestion. The set was easy to set up.

    However, I've had inconsistent results. The ROKU says the signal from the device four feet away is "moderate." Tonight the ROKU worked fine, although the sound and video quality were sketchy. Last night the Hopper, which is Wi-Fi enabled for Netflix, worked much better. Tonight, nothing on Netflix through the Hopper got beyond 25%.

    Maybe the DSL network is busy at night. I'll try earlier in the day and see how it goes.

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    Roku and TV moved. How best to boost the Wi-Fi signal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak View Post
    I went with this suggestion. The set was easy to set up.

    However, I've had inconsistent results. The ROKU says the signal from the device four feet away is "moderate." Tonight the ROKU worked fine, although the sound and video quality were sketchy. Last night the Hopper, which is Wi-Fi enabled for Netflix, worked much better. Tonight, nothing on Netflix through the Hopper got beyond 25%.

    Maybe the DSL network is busy at night. I'll try earlier in the day and see how it goes.
    . . .

    I tried the ROKU at 1:30 p.m. our time, and everything went quickly and smoothly. I think our problem in the evening is congestion on our DSL line. Looks like we'll have to change our viewing time

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak View Post
    .... The ROKU says the signal from the device four feet away is "moderate." ....
    So you didn't plug the Roku directly into the Ethernet port?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak View Post
    I went with this suggestion. The set was easy to set up.

    However, I've had inconsistent results. The ROKU says the signal from the device four feet away is "moderate." Tonight the ROKU worked fine, although the sound and video quality were sketchy. Last night the Hopper, which is Wi-Fi enabled for Netflix, worked much better. Tonight, nothing on Netflix through the Hopper got beyond 25%.

    Maybe the DSL network is busy at night. I'll try earlier in the day and see how it goes.
    You might have the extender too close to the wireless devices. Some friends of mine with Uverse bought a Netgear extender to get a wireless signal to their "smart" TV, and Netgear's advice was to put the extender half-way between the wireless router and the smart TV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak View Post
    . . .

    I tried the ROKU at 1:30 p.m. our time, and everything went quickly and smoothly. I think our problem in the evening is congestion on our DSL line. Looks like we'll have to change our viewing time
    I would go w/ a new ISP and dump the DSL. Most offer a new router for free.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  20. #15
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    Dsl

    Quote Originally Posted by wavy View Post
    I would go w/ a new ISP and dump the DSL. Most offer a new router for free.
    The only alternative in Santa Fe is Comcast, whom I loathe. But it may come to that,

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