View Poll Results: How do you feel that the FBI has crack the I phone

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  • Anger that my I phone is not safe

    0 0%
  • happy they got in to a terrorist's phone

    5 45.45%
  • Glad I have some other brand of phone

    3 27.27%
  • Do not put any thing important data on my phone

    5 45.45%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger smithdoor's Avatar
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    FBI one Apple zero

    Now how do you feel that the FBI has crack the I phone

    This now open the door for hackers now knowing it can be done
    My self when get rid of a old hard drive I first us a de-magnetizer then burn the hard drive

    Dave

  2. #2
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    One of the arguments against the FBI suit from the start is that there were approaches to this that they had not tried. Your poll is missing a response that I would be more likely to choose:

    x Pissed that the FBI found it necessary to publicly sue Apple before they had explored all the options open to them.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger smithdoor's Avatar
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    I see your point
    If Apple just open the I phone with out tell any that work of worked too.
    I do not see any winners here except for the people safety from terrorist's maybe???
    Any owning I-phones now know it can be hack from outside Apple
    Now hackers will start on the I-phone sad to say.
    I have Windows phone just so works with windows 10 other whys I too would have a I-phone.

    I just hope some good comes from all this.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    One of the arguments against the FBI suit from the start is that there were approaches to this that they had not tried. Your poll is missing a response that I would be more likely to choose:

    x Pissed that the FBI found it necessary to publicly sue Apple before they had explored all the options open to them.

  4. #4
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    There are, indeed, no winners. Every Attorney General in the country is now standing in line at the FBI office wanting help doing the same thing. There's a separate (but no less long) line for foreign governments.

    Before this suit, Apple had already been working to take encryption even further than it is now. After the news that the FBI cracked it, the demand for stronger encryption has gotten even louder.

    Here is my suggestion, make the encryption as tight as it can be made but create a back door and give the key to the members of the US Supreme Court. Anyone who needs a phone unlocked can take it to one of them. Viola, problem solved.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  5. #5
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    Your poll is missing a response that I would be more likely to choose
    I second what gsmith-plm said. I'm no friend of terrorists but I sided with Apple due to what I believe the intermediate and long-term implications of the FBI request were.

    The question now is, what are the implications of having had a private company do this work? Will the company retain ownership rights to the technique? Is the technique difficult and expensive enough to keep it out of the hands of criminals and terrorists? As long as there are real controls in place and it won't be leveraged up to mass surveillance just because, then I might be OK with this outcome.

    However I don't really believe this is over. The FBI wants a cowering and compliant tech sector, as do the rest of the Three Letter Agencies. They will try again.
    Last edited by BHarder; 2016-04-01 at 15:57. Reason: Clarified by adding quote

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Surely the FBI has just publicly scored a home goal in the way that this has been handled? Hasn't it just handed not just Apple but every other hi-tech US company the justification for creating even more resilient encryption products that nobody will be able to crack?

    I know that Apple has begun legal moves to force disclosure about how the hack was done but, seriously, does Apple really care? All it needed to know was that its current encryption (on older kit which doesn't have Secure Enclave) wasn't robust enough. That's now been publicly acknowledged.

    Is there going to be a new iOS update in the next few months - "Download iOS 9.4 to update encryption on your 5C and earlier non-TouchID devices". Are there going to be new Apple ads like "Worried about your security? Trade in your old iPhone for a new TouchID-enabled iPhone with updated Secure Enclave".

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    Here is my suggestion, make the encryption as tight as it can be made but create a back door and give the key to the members of the US Supreme Court. Anyone who needs a phone unlocked can take it to one of them. Viola, problem solved.
    Ah! I see the date of your post.

    cheers, Paul

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  9. #8
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    The Supreme Court suggestion contains a kernel of goodness in that it would establish a more robust authorization chain. And it would discourage frivolous or low value requests to break into phones.

    Where it falls down is that the number of requests you can anticipate would quickly break the system. In short order you can anticipate Supreme Court judges handing off this work to assistants, and then the assistants complain and so specialized staff are hired. Eventually this system is reformed due to "expense, inconvenience for the requesting authorities, it's not timely and the process has excess inefficiencies". The final state is that the Three Letter Agencies have the keys and break into phones any time, any place, and for the most trivial reasons imaginable.

  10. #9
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    Anyone who thinks any form of encryption is unbreakable lives in la-la land. Apple has always been in a position to do so, quite possible for a much lower cost than what the FBI ended up paying. It is therefore specious to claim that the FBI's ability to do it themselves proves the validity of Apples case. As for the Supreme Court, isn't that the same body that issued the order Apple was contesting? Besides which, there are jurisdictions outside the US you'd need to consider as well. In all likelihood other government agencies (both in the US and elsewhere) have long since broken the encryption. The only difference now is that you know of one that admits to it...
    Last edited by macropod; 2016-04-04 at 10:50. Reason: typo
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    Paul Edstein
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  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    Where it falls down is that the number of requests you can anticipate would quickly break the system. In short order you can anticipate Supreme Court judges handing off this work to assistants, and then the assistants complain and so specialized staff are hired.
    Exactly. My post was partially a joke, partially not. The FBI's position was that they just wanted Apple to crack the one phone; Apples position is that it wouldn't be just one and that once started it would get out of control.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  12. #11
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post

    Here is my suggestion, make the encryption as tight as it can be made but create a back door and give the key to the members of the US Supreme Court. Anyone who needs a phone unlocked can take it to one of them. Viola, problem solved.
    Ha that's a road to a REAL Cat Fight!



    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  13. #12
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macropod View Post
    As for the Supreme Court, isn't that the same body that issued the order Apple was contesting? .
    No!

    Edited below

    And at this point do we even know if they have just cracked it? We only know what a 3Letter tells us they did. They may have had it cracked already, extending the value of the data on the phone by some weeks. The relevant data may already be sitting in Tennessee or Utah gleaned via one of their taps.

    I have very mixed feelings regarding this whole complex issue and just about zero ability to have any influence on the outcome. The whole thing is one big Crap Shoot.
    Last edited by wavy; 2016-04-04 at 14:03.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by macropod View Post
    As for the Supreme Court, isn't that the same body that issued the order Apple was contesting?
    No, it was federal judge. If it had gone all the way to the Supreme Court, and they ordered it, it would have been Game Over for Tim Cook and Apple.

  15. #14
    2 Star Lounger smithdoor's Avatar
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    After Apple fail on the I-phone for lost boat I think they could not crack there own I-phone
    Apple will need hire a hacker to get in to the I phone

    Dave

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