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  1. #1
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    How to replace HD D: which has Program Files?

    The HD on my new PC build has failed to be found by Windows twice in the first 10 days but not in the 4-5 weeks since. Can I just copy the contents to a new HD and swap it out? Or is it more complicated?
    • After the first failure, I rebooted, everything was fine, but I shut it down and relocated the HD and used a different SATA3 cable and diff MB port. Then it failed 4 days later. Rebooted immediately and maybe 10 times since and have had no problems.
    • My new PC: new MB, new SATA3 cables, SSD, HD, Intel i5 Skylake, and Win 10 - the HD is the only old component
    • My C: drive is a small SSD so I put lesser programs into a "Programs" directory on D:, a 500GB HD
    • The HD is out of my old PC (Win XP) and has never had any issues.
    • I bought a 1TB HD thinking it'd be a good idea, just in case there is something amiss.

    Since this isn't the C: drive with Windows and the "official" Program Files, my instinct is copy the old HD onto the new HD, shut down and swap drives, and boot up. But sometimes it's smart to ask first...

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobkirk View Post
    The HD on my new PC build has failed to be found by Windows twice in the first 10 days but not in the 4-5 weeks since. Can I just copy the contents to a new HD and swap it out? Or is it more complicated?
    • After the first failure, I rebooted, everything was fine, but I shut it down and relocated the HD and used a different SATA3 cable and diff MB port. Then it failed 4 days later. Rebooted immediately and maybe 10 times since and have had no problems.
    • My new PC: new MB, new SATA3 cables, SSD, HD, Intel i5 Skylake, and Win 10 - the HD is the only old component
    • My C: drive is a small SSD so I put lesser programs into a "Programs" directory on D:, a 500GB HD
    • The HD is out of my old PC (Win XP) and has never had any issues.
    • I bought a 1TB HD thinking it'd be a good idea, just in case there is something amiss.

    Since this isn't the C: drive with Windows and the "official" Program Files, my instinct is copy the old HD onto the new HD, shut down and swap drives, and boot up. But sometimes it's smart to ask first...

    Thank you
    My practice when swapping out a failing hard drive is to make a full drive image of the old drive, then restore that image to the new drive (in your case you will want to use the option to expand the image to fit the hard drive, available on most imaging software). I've never had any issues when using this method.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  3. #3
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    Make sure it's a disk issue by running the manufacturer's diags on it.
    Back up (image) the disk before doing anything.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    How does expand work?
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  5. #5
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    It takes the original image, which we assume is on a smaller disk, and copies it to the new disk, then adds the remaining space to the partition. Same as expanding a partition on an existing disk.

    cheers, Paul

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