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  1. #1
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    Where to save files in Win 10

    In early mailware days, the recommendation was to not use the default Windows locations to save anything. Ever since I've been saving things, including Firefox and Eudora 7 data, to various subfolders of C:\Data. It's a convenent way to have just about everything that needs backing up in one place. What are the pros and cons continuing this practice for when I upgrade to Windows 10?

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    3 Star Lounger djohnson's Avatar
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    If you upgrade nothing will change. Your files will remain in place. That is if everything runs smoothly. I always keep anything I need saved on a separate drive. All my real important stuff is in the cloud where nothing can touch it.

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    Your system looks reasonable to me, which is likely why it has survived to this point. However you asked about pros and cons, so here's what I would say:

    Pros
    - your data is consolidated and the root folder name is reasonable;
    - you know your system and it works for you;
    - you have some sort of backup system.

    Cons
    - it doesn't work the way Windows does, and the Windows system is also reasonable;
    - many automated backup systems that aspire to be data only and simple, won't find your data;
    - if someone else uses/rescues/maintains your system, they may not find your homebrew data folder;
    - the default Windows system is explicitly multi-user with data segregation. Your system assumes a single user, or possibly data sharing among all users.

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    Quote Originally Posted by djohnson View Post
    If you upgrade nothing will change. Your files will remain in place. That is if everything runs smoothly. I always keep anything I need saved on a separate drive. All my real important stuff is in the cloud where nothing can touch it.
    How is any of that at all relevant to the question asked?
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  5. #5
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    I know my system isn't like Windows'. That was exactly the reason it was recommended way back when. I guess I should rephrase my question as: is it still *safer* to store my data away from the default Windows locations? Windows 10 is a whole different universe than Windows 3.0 was, and the world now is full of lot more mean, nasty folks who want your data and/or your money.

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    It has never been anything ore than marginally safer, at best, to store files anywhere other than the default locations. There are very good reasons for using the default locations, including:
    1. If you use the defaults and the software needs to be reinstalled, it will find your files without the need to reconfigure it;
    2. Some backup software backs up files in the default locations anyway but needs to be told about other locations.

    In any event, very little malware, except for that which attacks a program's executable files, has ever limited its nefarious activities to default locations.

    In the very early days (mostly pre-Windows), apps sometimes defaulted to storing data files in the application program folders, but those days are long gone. But that was in an era where the OS was primitive by today's standards.

    Whatever sense of security you gained from a process that was never recommended by those making software to fight malware would have been a false one and, hence, more likely to lull you into being less vigilant than you should have been.
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  7. #7
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    Thank you. The next time I reinstall Win 7 (soon, as I'm having problems) I'll do that so I'm ready to update to Win 10.

  8. #8
    3 Star Lounger djohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macropod View Post
    How is any of that at all relevant to the question asked?
    Surely you jest!

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    Quote Originally Posted by djohnson View Post
    Surely you jest!
    You didn't offer a pro or a con, so you didn't answer the question.

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    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    I'm just sitting here, reading all this and wondering, "what difference does it make what folder your data is in, when the HD screams at you and then Smokes! ???"

    Let Windows and your Programs put their data files in the default locations, then they know where to find them, but then set up a Backup routine where you regularly back up your data files to an external hard drive, or BIG Flash Drive.

    I'm really kind of a Backup Aficianado, so anytime the subject of "Data Files" comes up, I'm all about "where and how are you going to back it up, in case that old hard drive shoots craps."
    I've been doing this stuff for 36 years now, and I've had several hard drives crap out on me, but in all that time, I've never lost even ONE important data file, because I keep my data files backed up to separate Hard Drives.
    Even in the DOS days, I always ran two hard drives, the second one being just for a backup of my main drive.
    In the '80's that was almost unheard of.

    Today, I make a backup image file off of my C: drive at least weekly (not weakly) and it's stored on an External 1TB drive, and my data files are copied to an external HD daily, using a batch file that I wrote myself.

    My favorite saying is "the only BAD backup is the one you decided NOT to make".

    So regardless, of where you store your data files on your main drive, 'Back'em up to an external drive'.
    (your personal data files, should NEVER leave your possession)

    Cheers Mates! I'm sorry this ran so long.
    The Doctor
    Last edited by DrWho; 2016-04-09 at 13:17.
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

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  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by djohnson View Post
    Surely you jest!
    Not at all. How about reading the question asked. You either ignored it completely or don't have a clue. Either way your reply was quite irrelevant.
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  13. #12
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    I've been backing up daily since DOS days, because the person who taught me (he owned an independent computer shop) was was a fanatic about safety and privacy (hence, DR DOS rather than MS DOS, files in places other than the default, but that made sense to you, and back ups daily, and, of course, Norton antivirus, etc., back then). I was using tape backup devices as soon as they became available, and then external hard drives. I don't do cloud backup simply because my DSL line is the slowest possible (my ISP hasn't seen fit to upgrade in my part of the city).

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    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by areader View Post
    I've been backing up daily since DOS days, because the person who taught me (he owned an independent computer shop) was was a fanatic about safety and privacy (hence, DR DOS rather than MS DOS, files in places other than the default, but that made sense to you, and back ups daily, and, of course, Norton antivirus, etc., back then). I was using tape backup devices as soon as they became available, and then external hard drives. I don't do cloud backup simply because my DSL line is the slowest possible (my ISP hasn't seen fit to upgrade in my part of the city).
    In Windows 10 one can relocate user data to a different partition/drive using the Location tab for user data Folder Properties (not all user folders have a location tab; those that don't can't be moved in this manner). Once the initial relocation is done, all new/changed data goes to the new location. The attached image should indicate what I'm talking about. I try to use a partition naming convention that is indicative of the contents of the partition.

    I dual boot 8.1 and 10, use drive imaging for backup, and I use multiple partitions for my different types of data. Some data is quite static, and doesn't need to be backed up until something actually changes. A 3 month old backup of data that has not changed is just as useful as a 3 hour old backup of that same data. Sorting in this manner makes for more efficient use of my backup hard drives, a quicker imaging process and less time needed to restore an image.

    I have drive image storage space on partitions on two of the hard drives, and the 2TB drive is only used for drive images. I also have a separate 3TB Seagate NAS and a 6TB Windows 10 NAS where other drive images and copies of the drive images from the image partitions on this desktop are stored.



    Partitions.PNG
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  15. #14
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    Just a warning about C:\Data - see this thread: http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...ing-for-future

  16. #15
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    Thank you!! I will rename my data folder before upgrading.

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