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  1. #1
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    Question IT personnel, your opinion of Win10 on your network?

    I did something like this before. I am looking for the opinions of those who work in IT departments or run networks of PC's in businesses regarding Windows 10 on their network.

    Most businesses large and small buy major maker PC's boxed with Windows Home versions. How does having automatic updating out of your control effect your opinion of networked Win10 PCs? Or am I missing something? I cannot see most businesses upgrading all boxes to Win10 Enterprise to maintain upgrade control.

    I frankly wonder how happy IT people are with MS control over their network from a Windows update perspective? Or am I misunderstanding how it works?

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    I'd disagree that large businesses buy Windows Home. Windows Pro certainly.

    The very large business where I work is switching from all Windows 7 Pro laptops (there are very few desktops; people get docking stations) to all Windows 10 Pro laptops.

    So update settings (e.g. WSUS) get controlled by Group Policy on Pro versions.

    Small businesses may indeed buy Windows Home versions, and therefore have concerns about all-or-nothing Windows Updates.

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    I agree with BruceR, businesses above a certain size will routinely run Windows Professional or higher. They also have lots of control of updates via GPOs, WSUS, WUB, security settings and more.

    My organization has even gone one step further and uses a third-party enterprise management suite. Updates are performed via this product and we no longer use WSUS at all.

    The other thing is the application deployment model. What you run on the endpoints is a little less, ah, urgent, once you start virtualizing the applications. Citrix, cloud, web, App-V, there are a lot of deployment models that move the apps off the clients and firmly stick them on servers. I'd never say the client OS is irrelevant, that's not the point here.

    However most business IT departments are focusing on managing their application inventory as their primary job and responsibility. And once you de-couple applications from the client OS you gain more freedom and flexibility on those clients.

    The whole point is to avoid Catch-22 upgrade situations: You can't upgrade the clients because your enterprise application is old and doesn't support the new client OS. At the same time you can't upgrade the enterprise application because the new version doesn't support the old client OS and you have too many of those old client OSes.

  4. #4
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fascist Nation View Post
    Most businesses large and small buy major maker PC's boxed with Windows Home versions. How does having automatic updating out of your control effect your opinion of networked Win10 PCs? Or am I missing something? I cannot see most businesses upgrading all boxes to Win10 Enterprise to maintain upgrade control.
    All of the large companies I have worked at have done one or more of the following when purchasing new computers:
    1. Created the image they wanted (with a domain-compatible version of Windows), and then sent that image to HP / Dell / etc to put on all PCs they purchase before they ship.
    2. Put the above-described image on themselves when setting up new PCs.
    3. Buy computers with a domain-compatible version of Windows on them.

    The only time I have seen "home" versions of Windows has been with very small companies, who go to Office Depot, Best Buy, or some similar store, to purchase their computers, because they don't have domain set up at their office. At most they do peer-to-peer networking.

    In terms of updates (the title of your post), in one company I worked, they used WSUS to have complete control over updates, while another company I worked set all of the PCs on automatic updates, hiding the updates we knew were problematic.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2016-04-14 at 14:36.

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    Thank you for the informative comments and opinions.

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    In a smaller business you can easily use Microsoft Intune to control updates (and other things) for a reasonable amount of money per month. The amount depends on whether you want OS upgrade rights or not. If you choose the OS option you can install the Enterprise version and get all the control you wish. You still can control the update process regardless of the option you choose.

    See Microsoft Intune for details.
    Joe

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  8. #7
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP517 View Post
    In a smaller business you can easily use Microsoft Intune to control updates (and other things) for a reasonable amount of money per month. The amount depends on whether you want OS upgrade rights or not. If you choose the OS option you can install the Enterprise version and get all the control you wish. You still can control the update process regardless of the option you choose.

    See Microsoft Intune for details.
    Looks like it does a whole lot more than just let you manage updates.

    Not to deviate from the topic of this thread, but look at the guy Microsoft used as a model for their Intune brochure - looks like he came to work without shaving or even combing his hair!

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    Yeah, you can do a lot more than just manage updates. You get a lot of enterprise grade functionality without having to deploy the internal infrastructure.
    Joe

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