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  1. #1
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    Does this protect backups from malware ?

    Hello,

    Storing backups, especially images, is really convenient in a dedicated internal hard drive in one's PC. There are all the problems associated with not-off-site backups of course, but one obvious one is that malware, especially ransomware has full access to them.

    I wonder if it's sufficient to disable the drive in Device Manager between uses ?

    Does anyone have any thoughts or experiences about this ?

    Thanks
    Gary

  2. #2
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    There seems to be a slight difference opinion on that, but however convenient, I wouldn't keep images on the same machine and a detachable external HDD would be the safest option.

    http://www.cnet.com/forums/discussio...by-ransomware/

    https://askleo.com/will-malware-infe...rives-as-well/

  3. #3
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    Keeping images on an internal disk is fine if you don't get ransomware. Copying the images to an external disk is good insurance against all the other problems that may occur - machine failure, fire, flood, lightning strike, theft, kids, etc.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Keeping images on an internal disk is fine if you don't get ransomware. Copying the images to an external disk is good insurance against all the other problems that may occur - machine failure, fire, flood, lightning strike, theft, kids, etc.

    cheers, Paul
    I do the same, keep one copy of the drive image on an internal drive and another on an external HDD which is disconnected straight after
    Last edited by Slorm; 2016-04-18 at 07:33. Reason: typo

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    Answering your specific question, the doubt is whether any malware can enable your drive. I guess that wouldn't be too normal, but it can't be excluded.

    In any case, backing up to a drive on the same computer is not very recommended. There can be catastrophic failures where all drives are compromised.
    To be completely safe, you need to use other computers / external drives and also consider offsite backup.
    Rui
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    Even forgetting about fire and flood, it is still possible for an electrical surge to kill that backup drive since it is electrically connected to the rest of the computer.

    Perhaps the chances are low, it all comes down to what level of risk is acceptable to you.
    My Dad suffered an electrical event that took out everything connected to his PC including all internal drives and external connected USB drives.

    -brino

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slorm View Post
    I do the same, keep one copy of the drive image on an internal drive and another on an external HDD which is disconnected straight after
    Here too.
    And I take it one step more and keep two large external drives. One at home and one at the office holding backups of each computer. I swap these once a week so even if one is destroyed nothing is more than a week old. Of course daily would be better but not really need in my case.
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    I use two external HDDs where I keep the latest one on one of them and a slightly older one on the other.

    The older one came to may aid recently when the defrag wouldn't work because of a corrupt file in Task Scheduler.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    .... Copying the images to an external disk is good insurance against all the other problems that may occur - ... fire, flood, ... theft, ...
    Not if your external drive is part of the flood, fire or theft. Kids too.

    No backup connected to a ransomware or other malware infected system can be guaranteed safe from infection. Only off site (either physically, file server or cloud) is a real separate secure measure which is why a lot of IT guys go home with a server backup (tape?) with them. Assumes the system was not already infected at time of backup.

    For home owner (or anyone) an SSD is far more stable in a car than a HDD if and SSD can hold your backup. Can also keep the backup at work if you have a permanent work location (desk, locker, toolbox) or at a relative's or friend's dwelling.

    Consider encrypting the backup if kept outside the dwelling, or if young kids can play with and lose it. Storage holders that cushion against shock and prevent access by static discharge are readily available. Fireproof/waterproof wall safe in floor can help. Waterproof holder?

    No backup can be applied to a booted infected system without risking infection, so a method of applying the backup from a hardened (DVD) boot device that allows formatting the infected HDD first before applying the backup is needed.

    All of this requires bringing it home and updating backup, or automation of backup offsite on file server or cloud. Good reasons for doing both. Good risks with both.

  10. #10
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    To restore an image from an external HDD is done outside of Windows, so wouldn't necessarily be subject to the risk of infection.

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