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  1. #1
    iNET Interactive
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    Windows migration mangles gigabytes of information


    LangaList Plus

    Windows migration mangles gigabytes of information


    By Fred Langa

    An unknown problem after an upgrade from Win7 to Win10 scrambles over 300GB of user files.

    Plus: Is it worth enabling Internet Explorer's obscure "Enable Strict P3P Validation" setting?

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/langalist-plus/windows-migration-mangles-gigabytes-of-information/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    Lounger
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    Windows migration mangles gigabytes of information

    Could this be related to Windows 10's fast boot system which is set to on by default?

    Especially with external HDD's on dual booting systems it can cause corruption when booting say, into Windows 7, after the PC was previously shut down from Windows 10 (without previously safely ejecting the HDD whilst still in Windows 10).

    I run the windows 10 insider preview on a triple system HDD and, as a matter of course I always turn off fast boot.

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    rbailin (2016-05-03)

  4. #3
    New Lounger
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    This sounds like a slow USB drive buffer overrun. XCOPY /v/f would have been a better way to copy the original files.

  5. #4
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    SpinRite to the Rescue?

    The first thing that came to mind when I read about the garbled/corrupted folders and files on the external drive was that Steve Gibson's SpinRite might be able to help get the drive back into shape. I've used it a number of times to recover files from a failing drive, and it really does work. Some damaged drives are beyond the reach of SpinRite's recovery scheme, but if the folders/files are critical and/or unique, it's worth a try, and it's a good tool to have on hand in any case, imo.

  6. #5
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    My two cents worth:

    Yes, multi-partition and multi-boot disks, especially those with NTFS Partitions locked up by Windows Fast Startup (not Fast Boot or UEFI Boot or WIMBoot, which can cause other types of disk corruption issues) all sorts of file system corruptions can occur if Fast Startup is not disabled prior to an upgrade under Windows 8 through Windows 10. This includes the upcoming Anniversary Update.

    Fast Startup does not allow Windows to fully shut down. (The active partition or drive is not "ejected" fully.) Instead, it goes into hybrid hibernate, where the System State of each NTFS partition is recorded to a small hiberfile, and the rest of the system state is suspended. This uses a little battery power, but is otherwise similar to true hibernate with its huge hiberfile.sys.

    The difference is, any changes made to any NTFS partition when any Windows instance on the disk is in a hybrid hibernate system state, will risk file system corruption upon resuming Windows in any of its instances. This is especially risky when upgrading one Windows instance in a dual-boot, or when Linux or some other non-Windows OS is present with its own boot loader or boot manager (like GRUB2).

    My own Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 Pro upgrade wrecked all my NTFS and Extended Partitions on the main system hard disk, and I wasn't even using Fast Startup.

    Ubuntu Linux refuses to touch an NTFS partition which is involved in Fast Startup, saying that Windows is not properly shut down, which is true. Even a simple attempt at a read or write to such a locked partition can corrupt its entire file system.

    Trust me -- I've done this and suffered the issue of re-creating whole data partitions and restoring masses of files from backups.

    Bottom line -- whenever doing any large system changes, turn off all hibernate functions in all OSes present at the time of upgrade. Especially Suspend or hybrid hibernate/ Fast Startup. Restore these features after the upgrade is proven successful.

    Don 't risk your data for the mere convenience of faster boot and Windows launch times. And if using a second OS which needs access to the NTFS data partitions, disable Fast Startup permanently. Your data will thank you!

    Did I mention the mantra of Windows users?

    BACKUP BACKUP BACKUP!!!

    With Windows File History, there is really no excuse not to have both Cloud and local backups of data files.

    Even Linux has ddCopy. And Clonezilla for System backups. For Windows System Backups, I use Macrium Reflect Free.

    For UEFI Fast Boot or WIMBoot systems, back up all partitions at the same time. You will usually be prompted to do so if using the default Back Up All Partitions Needed To Restore Windows in MRF's Main Backup Menu options.

    Opt to back up the MBR or GPT information while you're at it. This often makes Boot Repairs and File System (Windows Checkdisk) repairs possible even on a badly munged disk where Windows won't even boot into Safe Mode.

    Make sure you can boot the Rescue Environment (WinPE 10) from USB or optical disk. And keep these tools up to date. Just in case all else fails. Boot Repairs can only be done if you have bootable rescue media or a working Boot Menu option to boot from the onboard Macrium Reflect WinPE 10 rescue environment. Again, test frequently and keep the Boot Menu option up to date.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2016-05-04 at 03:16.
    -- Bob Primak --

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