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    reluctant

    I have been reluctant to upgrade to Windows 10 because when I upgraded to Win 7, there were several software apps that would not run due to "administrator" privileges. My Win 7 OS runs on a SSD and then I slaved my original hard disk to it, hoping things would work, but that's when the problem with apps running started. Anyway, I'd like to unhook the slaved hard disk, upgrade to Win 10, then connect the hard drive again, but with it as an additional OS running Win XP (it is still on the hard drive) (using a dual boot system). My question is would this work? Since the win & upgrade, I have installed several new apps to the old hard drive (drive E), and wonder if this will become a nightmare if it is disconnected and the upgrade looks for it.

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    I'd be reluctant, too, unless I first acquired an external hard disk for backups (images), then made an image of each internal hard disk (all partitions).
    Afterward I would begin a methodical process of preparing for your new organization of the system/drives.

    In Phase One you might want to re-install those apps your mentioned (the ones on drive E), but this time I'd choose to put them on your SSD instead.
    Then, with everything important to Win 7 running from the SSD, I'd power down, disconnect the internal hard drive and reboot to make sure everything works (maybe test it for a couple of days).
    Make an image of the newly revised SSD (while it is still the home of Windows 7).

    In Phase Two I'd probably power down the computer and disconnect the SSD, connect the internal hard disk instead, and boot up from the hard disk to work out any potential problems with XP (I'm probably omitting a few steps here).

    Phase Three would be dedicated to performing the Windows 7 to Windows 10 Upgrade, and arranging for dual booting of Windows 10 and Windows XP.

    You might prefer to create a virtual drive for XP and simply run it within Windows 10. A lot depends on how much memory your system has (or could accept), number of cores in your CPU, etc. The whole process might be more of a learning experience than you're willing to attempt. On the other hand, you might gain great satisfaction from the experience.

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    That must be really old hardware!

    Problems with admin privileges probably just means you aren't running as an admin. You can either convert your user to an admin or use "Run as admin" for the recalcitrant programs.
    How have you"slaved" your hard disk to your SSD?
    +5 for external backup.

    cheers, Paul

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    I thank you for the quick response, and like the manner of working towards Win 10. I do have a 2 T external hard drive, but have never performed an image of any hard drive. I'll have to back up a little here: I had purchased a Windows 7 with the SSD installed, then connected my Windows XP hard drive as drive "E". This created numerous administrator problems running the apps on drive E. Some were resolved, but many not. With more space available on drive E, I then installed some apps there under Windows 7, and will do as you suggested to install those on the SSD, but not sure if there is room for all. My new question is since I changed some apps on drive E to run Windows 7, will that affect them when I disconnect it and use it as an additional OS?

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    How big is the SSD? I have more than enough room on my 120GB SSD.
    What else do you store on E?
    Where do you store your data and how much do you have?

    Backup
    As you have an external disk you should install a 3rd party backup program and create an image of your current system. Also create a recovery USB from the backup program.
    This will protect you if your hard disk dies.
    There are lots of free 3rd party backup programs: Aomei Backupper, Macrium Reflect, EaseUS ToDo, Paragon Backup.

    cheers, Paul

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    Since you've not been certain how to proceed, I'd first be sure I created an image (backup). Any of the free programs Paul mentioned in post #5 should do fine.
    Then you can proceed while being secure in the knowledge that you are prepared to start over completely if you mis-step along the way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by putter View Post
    I thank you for the quick response, and like the manner of working towards Win 10. I do have a 2 T external hard drive, but have never performed an image of any hard drive. I'll have to back up a little here: I had purchased a Windows 7 with the SSD installed, then connected my Windows XP hard drive as drive "E". This created numerous administrator problems running the apps on drive E. Some were resolved, but many not. With more space available on drive E, I then installed some apps there under Windows 7, and will do as you suggested to install those on the SSD, but not sure if there is room for all. My new question is since I changed some apps on drive E to run Windows 7, will that affect them when I disconnect it and use it as an additional OS?
    putter

    I would agree with Paul T that you are probably not logged on as an Administrator in W7.

    Once you resolve that, go back to W7, right click on your old program files - go to Properties > Compatibility tab - check the box "Run this program in compatiblity mode", select Windows XP, then check the the box "Run this program as an Administrator" at the bottom of the same tab.

    I haven't had any issues with this method in my version of Windows 7 Pro. All my old programs work as designed to work in XP.

    HTH

    Mike

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