Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    62
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Help for new user of W10

    I will soon replace my trusty but aging Vista machine with a W10 one. The change will be a big one for me as a user, having not paid attention to what the rest of you have been going through since the release of W8. I planned to get a new W7 machine and use it for its 7-or-so year lifetime, but I now believe this is not the best way for me to go.

    In looking for books for new users, one big problem reviewers note is that the books were published before W10 was released, and even readers who moved to W10 early on complained that the books did not match their new software, Now we are many revisions to the software later, and this issue is even more true.

    Are there new books, or web tutorials that are revised to better match the version I will actually have, or other recommendations you can make to help me? I would sincerely appreciate your advice.

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 984 Times in 914 Posts
    Windows 10 isn't that much different to Vista that you need to re-learn how to use it.
    Go to a shop and play with a W10 machine for a bit and you will see how easy it is.

    The only thing you need to decide is whether you will use a Microsoft ID or local account to login - I use a local account and have access to all the things I need.

    cheers, Paul

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul T For This Useful Post:

    Judy M (2016-05-29)

  4. #3
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    4,748
    Thanks
    171
    Thanked 649 Times in 572 Posts
    Paul Thurrott's Windows 10 Field Guide includes free updates:

    Incomplete, by design. Like Windows 10 itself, Windows 10 Field Guide will never really be complete. We are updating the book aggressively going forward, and whenever Microsoft meaningfully updates Windows 10 or its bundled apps. This was a key reason for self-publishing and doing so electronically: We can and will update this book regularly, and it will never be out of date.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to BruceR For This Useful Post:

    Judy M (2016-05-29)

  6. #4
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,794
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked 799 Times in 720 Posts
    Windows 10 has a built in Get Started app that helps a lot. I would encourage you to try that first:
    Click on the start Icon and click on the light bulb icon or type Get Started..

    Jerry

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to jwitalka For This Useful Post:

    Judy M (2016-05-29)

  8. #5
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    62
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thank you to all of you.

    Paul T, thank you for the reminder to use a local account.

    BruceR, I will check out the book you recommend.

    jwitalka,thank you also.

    Let me be a little more specific. If I follow the Getting Started defaults, I will install Cortana with all of its issues that have been raised by many without any of the advice they have given. I will accept the default to use the new photos, etc., without realizing that nothing will be migrated and I'll have to puzzle this out. I will have Edge as my default browser without the popup blocker installed.

    A zillion other things will happen that will be confusing to me as a user that I didn't know about and would have done differently if I had had non-Microsoft, current advice.

    I agree, Paul T, that I would be able to use it to some extent. But I'm not even sure I could connect to my wireless, much less install programs where I can find them or anything else.

    Do you folks or others have anything to add?

    Thanks again!

    Judy Myers

  9. #6
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    23,583
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1,058 Times in 927 Posts
    IMO, there has been a lot of attention grabbing headlines written about Windows 10. I use Cortana regularly. I try to use it more and more. I like the idea of an electronic assistant that can learn more about me and how I use my PC. Sure Microsoft has to have a lot of information to make it work well. Many people don't blink an eye at the data harvested by Google, Apple, Amazon, etc., etc. but yell and scream about Microsoft.

    BTW, unless you are desperate to get a new machine now I'd wait until the Windows 10 Anniversary update is available. It is going to be out this summer likely around July 29 (one year after the Windows 10 release). I would say that when you get the new machine, have both running for a period of time while you get used to Windows 10. You can migrate your data at your pace. You can test installing a program or two. If you regularly make backups of your PCs you can try things on the new PC and go back to the last backup if there is a catastrophe. I don't think you'll have much trouble with Windows 10 if you really commit to learning it. You can always start threads here about things that are troublesome or you don't understand.
    Joe

  10. #7
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 984 Times in 914 Posts
    You already know seem to know more about W10 than most people. I don't think you will have any trouble at all.

    cheers, Paul

  11. #8
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wellington NZ
    Posts
    32
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Having quickly skipped, barely consciously, through the Windows setup on a brand new laptop I'm afraid I misread the instructions as meaning "log in with your Microsoft ID or register for a new one". I missed any option to avoid Microsoft IDs entirely (and I do have an ID so I used it).
    This was a mistake, because (a) I really really would rather have it set up with a local user account, and (b) the laptop came with no media at all so doing a clean reinstall isn't the simple option that it might have been.
    Can I undo the damage or have I gone too far?

    cheers
    Trevor

  12. #9
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,794
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked 799 Times in 720 Posts
    To change to a local account:
    Start Icon > Settings > Accounts > Sign In with a Local Account instead

    Jerry

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to jwitalka For This Useful Post:

    aquatarkus (2016-06-02)

  14. #10
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 984 Times in 914 Posts
    How to do a clean install.
    Don't forget to backup/image your PC (preferably using a 3rd party backup utility) beforehand. (You should backup at least weekly.)

    cheers, Paul

  15. #11
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,404
    Thanks
    447
    Thanked 404 Times in 376 Posts
    Since you are using a Vista-era computer, your hard drive is pretty old (unless you have replaced the original drive). So this is probably a good time to purchase a new drive -- either a hard drive or an SSD. Then do a complete image backup of your current hard drive, then restore it to the new drive. Then put the old drive away for safe keeping -- it is now a full backup of your computer.

    Now you can safely upgrade to Windows 10, because if it goes south at any point, you can either restore the image you made to the new drive, or simply reinstall the old drive.

    It is a good idea to replace your hard drive every so often, because a hard drive is mechanical and will therefore eventually fail. Or the electronics on it can fail.

    With a new hard drive, you'll gain a bigger/faster/better hard drive. With a new SSD, you gain a super-fast, non-mechanical drive. Either way, it's a winner.

  16. #12
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 984 Times in 914 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    Since you are using a Vista-era computer, your hard drive is pretty old
    I'd replace the whole computer.

    cheers, Paul

  17. #13
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Forever West
    Posts
    2,075
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 259 Times in 248 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Judy M View Post
    I planned to get a new W7 machine and use it for its 7-or-so year lifetime, but I now believe this is not the best way for me to go.
    A small correction, it's only 4 years before the end of all support for Win7, early 2020. Vista is still good with extended support until about April 2017.

    The biggest problem for most users is that when support is ended for an Operating System many programmers and vendors of software end their support as they get no backup from the OS designers when things don't work as desired. With hardware a similar thing exists in that when a product is no longer being made or sold there is no money coming in for paying the programmers to update the software to run them, ergo hardware gets aimed to recycle or landfill. Some call it planned obsolescence but it boils down to simple economics, i.e. it's usually more cost-effective to replace an out-of-warranty inkjet printer than to send it off for repair.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •