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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Question Replacing Windows 10 with Linux

    I have a relatively old laptop running Windows 10. I'd like to get rid of that OS and install Linux. Should I format the disk?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    4 Star Lounger
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    That's a hard question to answer because there are so many variables -- you haven't told us much. Maybe you could tell us what your intention is in switching to Linux.

    Why not create an image first? That way you're not "burning bridges". You could always restore the current Windows 10 onto your hard drive.
    With insurance like that, you could format the hard drive and install whichever distribution (i.e., version) of Linux you wish.

    In either case, you may find that the hardware will run much faster if you also upgrade from a conventional hard drive to an SSD.
    I have an old laptop which originally ran Windows Vista but now runs Windows 10 from a 256 GB SSD I installed; it is now quite fast enough to suit me. With an SSD the battery lasts longer than previously, and it runs a good bit cooler than with a hard drive.

    RockE
    Last edited by RockE; 2016-06-01 at 17:08. Reason: grammar

  3. #3
    Star Lounger
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    No problem booting from ISO DVD. Didn't have to defeat fast boot and boot from rescue disk the way I had to on my new Windows 10 desktop.

  4. #4
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    Thanks. I did start with making an image. I have a $220 HP laptop with a small SSD for browsing. Lightweight, no fan, plenty fast. I also have an HP Envy desktop with a half a gig SSD. Extremely fast; use this guy for photo editing. I'm just playing around with Ubuntu on the old Lenovo laptop, like the geek I am.

  5. #5
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Since it is a relatively old laptop, if you are still on the original hard drive, you should install either a new hard drive or an SSD, and then install Linux to the new drive. In this way, you will have a better/faster/bigger drive, and your old drive becomes a full backup of what you had.

    The old drive will fail sooner or later, so when you do a clean install of the OS, that is a great time to install a new drive.

  6. #6
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    Yes, format the disk. Linux uses a different format to Windows.

    cheers, Paul

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keffdoak
    I'd like to get rid of that OS and install Linux. Should I format the disk?
    You don't really have any need to make that decision as the disk will be formatted and partitioned anyway.

    A 'standard' install will automatically use the file/partition system used by whatever Linux 'flavour' you choose whilst a 'custom' install will ask you to choose between different file systems (and partition structure/sizes). Linux supports many file systems but, IMO, you would need to have a good reason to choose one different from whatever the 'standard' install provides. (Ubuntu advises against retaining an NTFS partition for use as 'home'.)

    If you're new to Linux then I suggest using a 'standard' install and let it all be carried out automatically for you.

  8. #8
    New Lounger
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    I would suggest that you create an image or even just leave the current HD alone and get a separate one to use for Linux. I'm not sure how much experience you've got using Linux but you may start running it and eventually decide that it's not for you and want to go back. I also don't know how into the Windows apps you are, Linux seems to have less choices but I don't find it terribly important anyway. I believe you can run Windows programs on Linux using programs like CrossOver Linux so that shouldn't be an issue. Going with a standard install is probably your best bet, though. Good luck.

  9. #9
    davidhk
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    Keffdoak,

    2 suggestions if I may:

    1. Create a Linux LiveDVD and play with it first and see if you like it or not.
    Linux LiveDVD allows you to run it directly from the disk WITHOUT installing into the computer. If you ever make a mess with it, it does not affect the actual computer.
    If you decide you want to install, you can then do so using the LiveDVD.
    I have a LiveDVD with Linus Mint 17.2 XFCE. I can just simple insert the DVD and play with the Linux whenever I want, and when I am done, just simply eject the DVD and I am back to Windows 10.
    The only reported downside is that it runs a little slower via the DVD. Personally I do not find it to be the case.

    2. What about dual booting Win 10 and Linus ? The old computer has enough RAM for it ?

  10. #10
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidhk View Post
    What about dual booting Win 10 and Linus ? The old computer has enough RAM for it ?
    I think you probably meant "Has the old computer enough hard disk space for it?"!
    Of course RAM is used only by the currently-booted operating system, and Linux needs less than Windows.

    If you want a 'similar' visual experience to Windows 7 in Linux, why not try Zorin (the Core version) which is free and is designed to look like Windows 7 (as much as this is possible)?
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

  11. #11
    New Lounger
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    Cool I agree with this

    Quote Originally Posted by davidhk View Post
    Keffdoak,

    1. Create a Linux LiveDVD and play with it first and see if you like it or not.
    I totally agree with this suggestion.
    It is a low risk way to experiment with a Linux distro and still have all of your windows system available if you want to go back or try a different distro.
    I tried 3 distros before settling on the one I am using now. Some are more windows user friendly than others. I am told after a while I might want to switch to another distro. And that's OK. There is no 'BEST' linux distro, just the one that's best for you.
    One of the reasons I chose the one I am using is that there was quite a few youTube videos about the system and how to install it and use it. That really helped me.

    For the record, I switched to Linux because I was so frustrated with windows update constantly frying my chips for no reason. It drained my battery quickly and heated up my laptop daily. Linux, so far, has not done that. In fact, it seems to run amazingly cool. I like that.

    I have run into a few speed bumps. Occasionally the laptop will not wake from sleep ( or maybe it's called hibernation). I have to reboot to get things back and working. Not often, but sometimes.
    I have had a challenge getting my Chromecast to work with local content. That is, I can't always see a movie from my hard drive on my television.
    For me, these are not deal breakers, just small stuff.
    And you can't beat the price of linux.

  12. #12
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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Grumpy View Post
    I totally agree with this suggestion.
    It is a low risk way to experiment with a Linux distro and still have all of your windows system available if you want to go back or try a different distro.
    Yes, burn live DVDs of the Linux distros you want to "test drive", evaluate them, image the current hard drive, replace the old one with a sufficiently large SSD, and then re-image it with the Windows image you just created. Then install your favorite Linux distro in a dual-boot configuration with Windows. You can even have multiple OSes if you like. If you decide that you want one or the other, you can change back to a single boot system by uninstalling the OS you don't want. Here's how:
    http://lifehacker.com/how-to-uninsta...ting-508710422
    How does that sound?

  13. #13
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    Why not image the hard drive, upgrade to a SSD, and then dual-boot Windows and Linux? Linux or Windows can be uninstalled from a dual-boot setup as desired. Here's how:
    http://lifehacker.com/how-to-uninsta...ting-508710422
    How does that sound?

  14. #14
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    Sorry about the double posts. I didn't see my reply appear right away, so I tried again because I didn't read the message about it not appearing until the forum moderator approves it. Silly me...

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