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  1. #1
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    Going from 32-bit to 64-bit W7

    I currently run a W7 SP1 32-bit desktop.

    I'm going to purchase a new laptop that will be W7 64-bit.

    Pardon the newbie question, but:
    will software like my currently installed Excel 2007 run on the new laptop; and will all my Excel spreadsheets run also?

    2nd newbie question:
    Are there any pitfalls on other potential "gotcha's" that I need to be aware of as I make the switch?

    Thanks for all your help,
    Dick

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Dick,

    Windows 64 bit is designed to run both 32 bit and 64 bit software.

    I run Office 2003 & Office 2010 Pro both 32 bit programs on all my machines and they are all running Windows 64 bit versions.

    In fact MS recommends the use of 32 bit Office over 64 bit Office unless you have a specific need for the additional memory address space provided by the 64 bit version.

    You can easily transfer your .xls* files from the old to the new computer and they will run just fine.

    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

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    The only gotchas I can think of are two.

    One, if you have any 16-bit programs they will not run. Also, if you have a 32-bit program which has a 16-bit installer it will not install. I have seen some older 32-bit programs where the installer was not upgraded to 32-bit.

    Two, make sure there are 64-bit Win7 drivers available for any peripherals you will keep.
    Joe

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    Why W7 on a new machine?

    cheers, Paul

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    Because I'll be able to use the new computer's power to do what I want as a user; and, the machine comes with a license to upgrade to W10 when and if I want to.

    If I ever go to W10 it'll be much later after all the kinks are (more) ironed out.

    Back in days of yore, when I worked on earlier IBM mainframes, we had a saying in regards to IBM patches when they first came out (and why it was better to wait to install them):

    "Pioneers get arrows, or raped by the ..."

    Dick

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    Other that the things Joe mentioned, I have seen only one instance of a problem with Windows 7 64-bit vs 32-bit.

    A friend of mine was in a study group which used Dropbox to share files among the group members. If you had W7 64-bit, you couldn't access the Dropbox folder (I don't know why). The workaround was to install XP Mode and access it from there.

    Fortunately for her, she had W7 32-bit, and she therefore had no problem accessing the folder directly from W7; she didn't have to install XP Mode.

    In my opinion, unless you have something that is very old, it should all work in W7 64-bit.

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    It seems the kinks are gone, except for Edge, so moving straight to W10 seems the best option to me. (I have a W8 and W10 machine BTW.)

    cheers, Paul

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    5 Star Lounger Lugh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    Are there any pitfalls on other potential "gotcha's"
    A possible gotcha, depending on your software:

    There are various add-ons and plug-ins for software which will only work on the 32-bit version of the main software. So it's a good idea to always use 32-bit software unless you have a clear reason to need the 64-bit version--you never know when you'll need some add-on, and Murphy says the one you want will only be available in 32-bit.
    Lugh.
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    Thanks Lugh; and, as we all kmow, Murphy is/was an optimist.

    Dick

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    5 Star Lounger Lugh's Avatar
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    Oh I should have clarified, the 32-bit software I mentioned will run fine on 64-bit Windows.

    Where you should get 64-bit software for 64-bit Windows is typically in apps which like to poke the system's innards, eg anti-malware, maintenance utilities, diagnostic tools etc. Such software should make it clear you need the 64-bit version.
    Lugh.
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    Thanks in advance for all your continued help. I now have a desktop and a laptop running W7. What happens regarding licenses for software i've purchased over the years?

    For example, I have Microsoft's Office on my desktop. If I delete that off my desktop can I legally install it on my laptop?

    Thanks,
    Dick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    Thanks in advance for all your continued help. I now have a desktop and a laptop running W7. What happens regarding licenses for software i've purchased over the years?

    For example, I have Microsoft's Office on my desktop. If I delete that off my desktop can I legally install it on my laptop?

    Thanks,
    Dick
    If it's a retail version, yes. You're licensed to use the software on x number of machines (typically, but not always, one), but it's not specified what machine.

    If it's OEM, that's a different story...

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    Hopefully this is my last question for this thread.
    The Dell Inspiron 3520 I bought with W7 SP1 - 64 bit came preloaded with some software that I don't want ton my machine . . . a McAfee suite for example.
    I want to delete such software, but I don't want to fall afoul of any "subscription" services and/or trials.

    What's the best way to ensure that when I run Revo to delete something off my new laptop that I don't have trial/subscription problems afterwards?

    Thank you,
    Dick

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    Unless you have the Pro version of Revo it won't uninstall 64-bit software so be careful. Use the normal Control Panel to uninstall software. If you want to really be sure go to the software vendor site and look around for a separate uninstall tool. Those usually remove all evidence of the program being uninstalled.

    I never had any problem with trials or subscriptions as long as I hadn't activated anything.
    Joe

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    Microsoft has been working on 64-bit support for nearly 12 years now. The earliest 64-bit windows was, I believe, Windows XP. There were a lot of problems getting 64-bit drivers and applications back then as you can imagine.

    These days that has all changed. Yes you can still find the odd problem, but really it is becoming rare and unusual to find any unresolvable situations. 64-bit is fully mainstream and is probably the "average" deployment now.

    The rules are that on a 64-bit version of Windows, the following must all be 64-bit: All Windows subsystems, drivers, and security software. This is a strict requirement.

    Applications can be 32 or 64-bit. 64-bit is preferable unless the vendor/supplier has advice to the contrary. Microsoft has a 64-bit version of Office but they still recommend using the 32-bit version, as Office plug-ins don't usually work on the 64-bit version.

    Forbidden on 64-bit Windows are any 16-bit Windows programs. The reason is that the 16-bit Windows on Windows subsystem has been removed (this is for 64-bit Windows only; the 32-bit versions still have the 16-bit WOW). How much is this a problem? Well, 16-bit Windows was last modern in Windows 3.11 for Workgroups. That was more than 22 years ago. So while it is possible this is downright rare. I probably haven't seen a 16-bit Windows program in a dozen years now.

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