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  1. #1
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    Permission Problems...

    I am using Windows 10 Home, 64-bit.

    How to I permanently and completely turn off the error message "You don't have permission to save in this location... blah blah blah"?

    I followed the advice in this post: http://www.tenforums.com/general-sup...-anything.html (see post #2) and it works but I don't want to do it for every folder for which I don't have permission to save/change a file.

    I am the only one that uses the PC, so I feel quite safe if I can give total administrator privileges to my username so that I am able to save/change a file in any directory that I want! I understand that Microsoft did this for safety reasons, but I am willing to take the risk and want to get rid of this annoyance!!

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    What directories do you want to save in?

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    What directories do you want to save in?

    cheers, Paul
    The directory I was recently having problems is located in c:\Program Files (x86). (I have this program which looks for its configuration file there and nowhere else...)
    However, the point of my posting is broader: I want to be free to save/change any file anywhere anytime using my username rather than the Administrator account or similar subterfuge. Yes, I know, Microsoft did it this way for safety purposes. But I am willing to take the risk!

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tb75252
    I want to be free to save/change any file anywhere anytime using my username rather than the Administrator account or similar subterfuge.
    Without going into a lot of detail, the simple answer is.... you can't.

    The only account that can do this is the System account and it is just not possible for you to run as System in the way that you want.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    Without going into a lot of detail, the simple answer is.... you can't.

    The only account that can do this is the System account and it is just not possible for you to run as System in the way that you want.
    I see... I was hoping that somebody had come up with a (free) utility that would do what I want. Oh well...

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tb75252
    I was hoping that somebody had come up with a (free) utility that would do what I want.
    Sorry but no. The highest privileges you can get using a username is by being a member of the Administrators group. Even more privileged is the Administrator account. (There's a subtle difference.) However, the System account trumps even the Administrator account and can 'do stuff' which even the Administrator account can't.

    Have a read of this article if you want a better appreciation of how convoluted it is to 'RunAs System'.

    (But please don't post a new thread starting "So, I was running as System...." Access to the System account is convoluted for very good reasons... and can wreck your OS in less time than it takes to say... Oops! )

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