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  1. #1
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    Installing SSD and Converting to WIN 10

    I have two PCs with plenty enough power/memory to run WIN 10. They are currently running WIN 7 Pro fully updated. They also have small SSDs as the boot drives, and over time I have had to move a lot of typical C: drive functions/data off them because they are too small. In fact, I have installed a number of apps elsewhere.
    Now is the time for me to go to 1T SSDs AND to WIN 10. The question is what steps should I take? I propose cloning the current, small, C: drives onto the new larger ones and then upgrading and re-installing the apps and functions which have been installed elsewhere as I can over time. I'll leave the "old", small SSDs on their individual machines and will zero out them out after I'm sure I have solid WIN 10 operations.
    Will WIN 10 fully install on the new SSD in this scenario or will it continue the current system?
    In this scenario, which is the best way to install WIN 10? Can I get one download to a DVD or to a thumb drive? I have USB3 on both machines and a USB 3 thumb drive.
    Anything specific to this situation I should look out for? Do both on line?
    Would the one download also work for another PC which is a WIN 7 Home Premium model and in which I'd continue to use the current C:?

  2. #2
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    At this point I suspect you will have to purchase W10 - we are past the MS deadline. (Edit: that's the 29th July. Thx Browni)

    Given your well modified installations I would start from scratch with the new SSDs and then add apps as required. The advantage is you can always reveret by swapping disks - in case you forgot to collect some value / key from the old system.
    If you already have a digital entitlement (you upgraded earlier and reverted) then you can install from scratch using the MS ISO.

    cheers, Paul
    Last edited by Paul T; 2016-07-01 at 04:47.

  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    The deadline for the free upgrade is 29th July, not yesterday!

  4. #4
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    Thanks for snapping me back to reality, Browni.
    For a moment after reading Paul's statement I found it difficult to shake the feeling that this might be the 1st of April.

  5. #5
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    Cool

    .
    "If you already have a digital entitlement (you upgraded earlier and reverted) then you can install from scratch using the MS ISO."

    Okay. Now I still have an option.
    How would I go about getting WIN10 on a fresh SSD? Do I physically install it in the computer and then run the ISO from a thumb drive or DVD? How would WIN know which OS is which?
    Once I get that step done, any sage advice on untangling the bits and pieces of WIN 7 I have on other drives?

  6. #6
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    @LinusF3
    Opinions will vary. Here are my initial thoughts...

    First, I would make a Windows 10 installation thumb drive using the Media Creation Tool (which can then be used to upgrade other computers as well).
    Next, I'd pick a partition manipulation program (perhaps the MiniTool Partition Wizard Bootable CD) so you can increase the size of your C: partition.

    If you want to upgrade while keeping most of your installed software follow procedure A, but if you wish to clean install Windows 10 (and install your programs from scratch) then follow procedure B:

    [A] First, image the computer's small SSD while saving that image to an external drive. (Use Macrium Reflect, or another free imaging program, or even pay for one if you choose.)
    Swap out the small SSD for your 1 TB SSD.
    Restore the image to the 1 TB SSD.
    Make sure it is activated.
    (At this point you'll have your Windows 7 system on a big drive.)
    Use a partition tool to resize the C: partition as you see fit.
    I would probably return my programs back to the C: drive at this point, but that's just my inclination.
    Lastly, upgrade the Windows 7 system to Windows 10 using the thumb drive (mentioned above) by inserting it and running "setup.exe".
    Then tackle the other computer.

    ...or...

    [B] Copy down the Product Key of your Windows 7 Pro system.
    Remove the small SSD, and put your 1 TB SSD in its place.
    Boot from the thumb drive you made and install Windows 10. When it asks for a key, give it your Windows 7 Pro product key.
    Install all your programs (if compatible).
    Then tackle the other computer.

    RockE
    Last edited by RockE; 2016-07-01 at 18:14. Reason: grammar

  7. #7
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    This post from Rick suggests creating a local license file to ease the upgrade.

    cheers, Paul

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    This post from Rick suggests creating a local license file to ease the upgrade.

    cheers, Paul

    @Paul T
    My experience tells me that (at the time of this writing) if you use the Media Creation Tool to download and burn your Win10 installation files to a USB thrumb drive (or DVD) then the version of Windows 10 you'll install when you use it will be build 10586.xxx, and all you need to activate that installation of Windows 10 will be a valid qualifying product key for Windows 7, Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 (or, of course, you can buy a license in order to activate Windows 10).
    Is there still some pressing need to create a GenuineTicket.xml file that I'm not recognizing?

    I've yet to find it inconvenient to "go online" to activate Windows 10, but I suppose that might be reason enough for someone to have a GenuineTicket.xml file handy. And I guess if you're trying to secure your ability to still activate after the deadline for free upgrade passes, then perhaps a GenuineTicket will do that. Is that it's value?

    To date, it's been my view that if someone created their installation thumb drive before build 10586 became available, then they simply need to create a newer version of installation thumb drive (using the Media Creation Tool again).

    RockE
    Last edited by RockE; 2016-07-03 at 11:52. Reason: typo

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockE
    Is there still some pressing need to create a GenuineTicket.xml file that I'm not recognizing?
    Using the GenuineTicket.xml file just automates the activation process. Even though MS has improved the activation process, there are still lots of people who have issues with it. For example, COA stickers where the Product Key is unreadable (e.g. laptops where the sticker is often partially burnt by the heat generated by the CPU) or it's just plain inconvenient to have to extract a mini-tower from a cubbyhole in a desk just to read the COA.

    Quote Originally Posted by RockE
    And I guess if you're trying to secure your ability to still activate after the deadline for free upgrade passes, then perhaps a GenuineTicket will do that. Is that it's value?
    Sorry, no. It can't be used for that purpose.

    Instead, think of it as a 'belt and braces' approach. If your COA is readily available/accessible and the Product Key is legible then there's absolutely no reason not to use it. If there's a glitch (e.g. you mis-read a B for an 8 on the COA) then your 'belt' may be telephone activation. If that doesn't work (e.g. you press a wrong number on the phone keypad) then you have the GenuineTicket.xml file as a fallback... your 'braces'.

    (Say you go to an event. You pay your entrance fee and get a ticket and your hand stamped. Later you leave the event for a breath of fresh air. When you go to re-enter the event you show the bouncer the stamp on your hand as you walk in. People without the hand stamp have to search through their jacket, their trousers, their wallet... where did you put the entrance ticket? The GenuineTicket.xml file is the hand stamp that lets you sail past.)

    Hope this helps...
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2016-07-02 at 21:33.

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    RockE (2016-07-03)

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    If your COA is readily available/accessible and the Product Key is legible then there's absolutely no reason not to use it.
    Thanks, that's what I thought.

  12. #11
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    I recently built a new Windows 10 machine (Desktop) and used a 500GB SSD for the installation of Windows and Programs and moved the 'Users' folder to a 4TB standard (but fast) hard drive. 1TB is about as big as SSDs are at sensible prices and this isn't enough storage for me. Depending on your requirements this may offer a good solution. Details of how to move the Users folder during installation can be found here: http://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/1...dows-10-a.html

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    RockE (2016-07-03)

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