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  1. #1
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    Microsoft Office365 support - an uncalled for remote access request

    I have a Office 365 Home subscription. Recently I granted access rights to a different account and the 1 TB OneDrive storage was not showing up on the associated Microsoft account. Tried a few times, to no avail, so I contacted Microsoft support, via chat, to have the problem solved.

    I explained the problem and the first thing the person on the other side wrote, after my explanation was "I would love to remote access your computer to solve the problem".

    Of course, I told her in clear terms I wouldn't grant such access, as it was absolutely not required to solve a problem with a cloud service, manifesting its effects online, not in any computer. When asked how come she needed remote access to solve such a problem, she just said "to be able to solve the problem faster", to which I replied she didn't need access.

    She ended up suggesting removing access rights and granting them again, which eventually worked, but I didn't wait to see the result to end the chat session. I provided the worst possible feedback on my experience, through the satisfaction inquiry that always ends such a session.

    It's just mind blowing that one can get these unjustified, stupid requests from people who obviously are working for Microsoft or Microsoft partners. Why would she want remote access that had no relevance at all for the problem she was supposed to help with? With so may scams being enacted through remote access, shouldn't Microsoft be more careful about the behavior of its employees and stop them from such mistrust inducing behavior?
    Rui
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    R4

  2. #2
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    In my experience with phone support in the USA, the first line people have a script from which they are loathe to deviate. That is regardless of industry or service.
    Joe

  3. #3
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    Not just in the USA.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
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    Well, if that is the case, it is quite bad. Script or no script, thinking about what you are doing is always smart.
    Rui
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  5. #5
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    First tier response in tech support is often geared to people who wouldn't know an icon from a command line. Rather than talking them through fixing something, it's often easiest to remotely access their computer and fix it.

    The fundamental problem with this approach is that the first tier support people are often somewhat inexperienced themselves. They have a set of pat answers and fixes that are pretty basic. Their first answer to almost everything is reboot, the second is reinstall and reboot. The second one often works but often at the expense of wiping out settings and sometimes screwing up other programs. I have heard people say that MS tech support suggested reinstalling Windows to fix a problem.

    By the time I call tech support, I've usually run through a bunch of routine stuff and been online looking for answers. When I do call, it's usually for something subtle or obscure. I have occasionally been able to convince the first person I get that I know as much or more than they do and to pass me on to someone higher up the chain.

    Telephone and even online support can be frustrating - I know because I've done my share of it. For almost all of our regular clients, we used to require that they have some form of remote support. It could be nearly impossible to talk someone through something even somewhat complex. I understand why companies use it. And I would hope that anyone doing remote support would know what the f* they were doing.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    First tier response in tech support is often geared to people who wouldn't know an icon from a command line. Rather than talking them through fixing something, it's often easiest to remotely access their computer and fix it.

    The fundamental problem with this approach is that the first tier support people are often somewhat inexperienced themselves. They have a set of pat answers and fixes that are pretty basic. Their first answer to almost everything is reboot, the second is reinstall and reboot. The second one often works but often at the expense of wiping out settings and sometimes screwing up other programs. I have heard people say that MS tech support suggested reinstalling Windows to fix a problem.

    By the time I call tech support, I've usually run through a bunch of routine stuff and been online looking for answers. When I do call, it's usually for something subtle or obscure. I have occasionally been able to convince the first person I get that I know as much or more than they do and to pass me on to someone higher up the chain.

    Telephone and even online support can be frustrating - I know because I've done my share of it. For almost all of our regular clients, we used to require that they have some form of remote support. It could be nearly impossible to talk someone through something even somewhat complex. I understand why companies use it. And I would hope that anyone doing remote support would know what the f* they were doing.
    I agree with your comment, but why would anyone suggest remoting to my computer to fix my OneDrive online storage from 15 MB to 1TB? That makes no sense at all... And the suggestion she made when I refused suggests that she knew what to suggest, so my doubt remains.

    I contacted Microsoft about it, but given the weekend and the 4th of July holiday, got no response. Hopefully tomorrow someone will reply.
    Rui
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    R4

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