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  1. #1
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    Am I permanently unable to re-upgrade?

    I tried Win10 on my laptop with a repair shop having reformatted my hard drive (they said a clean install of Win10 was best) and then installing Win10. The repair shop did not save my C:\Data folder and my user folder, as I told them to. Instead they saved only my user folder, which had very little I cared about saving. After I figured that out at home, I took the computer back, they reinstalled Win7 from my image file and didn't charge for the upgrade.

    For that first try of Win10, which was to see if my data survived the transition, I didn't sign up for a MS account or whatever they want you to do. I've since read that to re-upgrade after the deadline your first time had to include letting MS and Win10 do it "their" way before turning off everything you don't want. I will definitely let my desktop upgrade the way it wants to before I revert it to Win7.

    My question is: can I re-image and do an upgrade at home from a media creation file (my internet connection is too slow for the regular update method), and still be under the deadline? I know to rename my data folder to something else to make sure my data survives and to save that folder and my user folder in my external harddrive as plain copies (just in case!). I hope to upgrade, try Win10 properly, and then given everything I've read and seen, revert to Win7.

    What I want to know if I will be able to re-upgrade the laptop after the deadline if MS actually comes up with a version for those of us using mouses and who want lists, not icons for everything. Icons take up too darn much space on my laptop screen, although I could live with them on the desktop. So which is it: I'm safe, I'll be able to reupgrade the laptop after all, or I'm s--- out of luck because I didn't do it right the first time?

    TIA

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Once your laptop has been successfully upgraded to Windows 10, it is given a hardware ID by Microsoft on their servers. That hardware ID is the license for Windows 10 and will remain valid for that laptop. You should be able to reinstall without license difficulties.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  3. #3
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    I goofed in my initial message. I didn't do this step, from a July 7 Windows Secrets article:

    When initially setting up Win10, use your Microsoft Account username/password as the primary sign in. (If you don’t already have a Microsoft Account, you can create one on the fly.) Note: You can later change to another sign-in method such as PIN, facial-recognition, local account, or other. But it’s important to initially associate your new Win10 setup with your Microsoft Account.

    That's why I'm worried.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by areader
    But it’s important to initially associate your new Win10 setup with your Microsoft Account.
    It's not necessary to use a Microsoft account to use Windows 10, despite what Microsoft may imply. I'm fortunate to have several Win 10 devices... and I'm using a local account on every one of them (and will continue to do so).

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by areader View Post
    I goofed in my initial message. I didn't do this step, from a July 7 Windows Secrets article:

    When initially setting up Win10, use your Microsoft Account username/password as the primary sign in. (If you don’t already have a Microsoft Account, you can create one on the fly.) Note: You can later change to another sign-in method such as PIN, facial-recognition, local account, or other. But it’s important to initially associate your new Win10 setup with your Microsoft Account.

    That's why I'm worried.
    At present it is the PC that is associated with the Windows 10 License, not the user. Windows 10 can still be installed using a local account. You can setup a Microsoft account later if you wish. You'll need a Microsoft account for Store purchases, but not for regular PC use.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  6. #6
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    Thank you. Since I plan to never buy anything from MS again, the inability to use the Store is irrelevant to me.

  7. #7
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    Lots of free content in the store. If you use Edge that is where you'll get browser plugins.
    Joe

  8. #8
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    I will stick with Firefox at least for the time being. I have a lot of add-ons that I don't think have Edge equivalents.

    The fact is, for many years, probably back to Windows 95, I have tolerated Windows rather than liked it. Linux wasn't useful enough then, and I had decided against the Apple/Mac track way back with my first computer, a Radio Shack Color Computer. From early reports on Windows 10 I had thought to switch to Ubuntu, but my traveling computer (a netbook) is way too underpowered for even the Ubuntu versions for old hardware so I haven't been able to give them a fair try. That means I'm stuck with Windows for the foreseeable fututre.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by areader View Post
    From early reports on Windows 10 I had thought to switch to Ubuntu, but my traveling computer (a netbook) is way too underpowered for even the Ubuntu versions for old hardware so I haven't been able to give them a fair try. That means I'm stuck with Windows for the foreseeable fututre.
    There are many lite Linux distros that should work on your netbook, at least as well as Windows 10. Google "lite linux distros".
    George

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