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  1. #1
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    Upgrade fails

    I tried to follow the Win10 upgrade process, first using the windows update method (which got stuck on "beginning download"), then using an .ISO (downloaded with the media creation tool) copied to an Easy2boot USB stick. A clean install was performed as soon as I selected the install partition with NO upgrade options being offered and no warning/prompt that my apps & data would be deleted (although it did say windows.old would be created). I then tried by runing setup from an expanded copy of the .ISO with identical results. All my files & apps were removed. A windows.old was created but the recovery option under settings did not list the option to roll back to Windows 7. Fortunately I was able to restrore from an image backup.
    I wonder are there different versions of the .ISO available, some of which only perform clean installs, or could there be some other reason?

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    Did you start the upgrade from within Windows 7? Mount the ISO and run setup from within Windows.

    Oops. I forgot that you can't mount an ISO directly in Win7. See Mount an ISO image in Windows 7, Windows 8, 10, or Vista for instructions for Win7
    Joe

  3. #3
    davidhk
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    To : henryvii

    Just to elaborate further.

    There are 3 ways to upgrade to Windows 10 from Windows 7.

    1. By Windows Update.
    In this method, your Windows 7 must have service pack 1 (SP1) installed.
    This method will allow you to keep your files, settings and most apps.( Apps that are unsupported by Win 10 will be removed).

    2. By In-Place Upgrade Install.
    You do not need SP1 for this method.
    In this method, you will need to download the appropriate Windows 10 iso file and use it to do an in-place upgrade install.
    See details in Post #2.

    This method allows you to keep your files, settings and most of your apps.

    3. By Clean Install.
    You do not need SP1 for this method.
    In this method, you will need to first download the Win 10 iso file, then burn it to a bootable media, DVD or USB. Then use the media to do a clean install.
    This method will NOT allow you to keep anything. Hence the term Clean Install.
    Last edited by davidhk; 2016-07-13 at 14:54.

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    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidhk
    There are 3 ways to upgrade to Windows 10 from Windows 7.

    1. By Windows Update.
    2. By In-Place Upgrade Install.
    3. By Clean Install.
    Just to clarify, methods 1 and 2 will automatically re-use the device's current Windows activation status and, after upgrade and connection to the internet, will create/save the info - together with a unique hardware ID for the device - as a 'Digital Entitlement' on MS' activation servers.

    Method 3 - as 'clean install' implies - will not activate the device automatically unless you have a qualifying Windows Product Key (usually found on a Certificate Of Authenticity sticker attached to the device) so make sure you have this available before you start a 'clean install', especially if you have a laptop.

    Can anyone make out the Product Key from this burned and faded COA sticker (from a laptop I was asked to upgrade to Win 10).
    laptop-coa.png
    Click to enlarge

    Alternatively, save the device's current activation status before the 'clean install' and restore it after the upgrade. See steps 4 to 6 inclusive and steps 8 to 11 inclusive in this article for more info.

    Hope this helps...

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    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    Can anyone make out the Product Key from this burned and faded COA sticker (from a laptop I was asked to upgrade to Win 10)
    Wow, that COA has been through the mill!!!! Since you took a pic, have you tried the magnifier?

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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Can anyone make out the Product Key from this burned and faded COA sticker (from a laptop I was asked to upgrade to Win 10)
    Why not try running Magical Jellybean key finder on the laptop:
    https://www.magicaljellybean.com/keyfinder/

    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    Why not try running Magical Jellybean key finder on the laptop:
    https://www.magicaljellybean.com/keyfinder/

    Jerry
    If it's an OEM machine then Magic Jellybean will only give the vendor's generic key which will not be accepted.

    If the Win 10 upgrade doesn't come via Windows Updates which is unusual (I'm sick of hiding it), then use the Upgrade for free or Get started links in https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/wind...ows-10-upgrade

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lumpy95
    Since you took a pic, have you tried the magnifier?
    The pic itself was actually quite good quality seeing that it was taken using an 8 megapixel smartphone. I couldn't make out the product key even after enlarging the pic but - by comparing it to other COA's - worked out that, based on the green border at the bottom, it was most likely a version of Windows Vista, not Windows 7.

    PS - "Can anyone make out the Product Key from this burned and faded COA sticker?" was rhetorical. The laptop did turn out to be pre-Windows 7, had a damaged screen and, given its age and cost of a replacement, was scrapped 2 days ago. I just took a photo of the COA to show the state of it.
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2016-07-13 at 19:44.

  9. #9
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    It certainly was in a bad state. Sounds like good detective work though.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lumpy95
    Sounds like good detective work though.
    Not really. I have a couple of Windows 7 laptops and could see that their COAs looked different. I just did a search for images in Google for "Windows Vista COA" and within a few seconds found several pics of Vista Home Premium and Vista Pro that had the same green border on the bottom.

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