Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Backup using SSD and HD

    I have a Windows 10 system with 2 SSDs. I would like to reduce the time for a backup. I like to keep the two backups separate.
    I would like to back up disk 1 onto disk 2 then copy that backup to a spinning disk (and delete it) then
    backup disk 2 to disk 1, and copy that to spinning disk.

    I use windows 10 backup in command line mode. What files must I copy?

    Am I doing something 1) stupid 2) crazy 3) just wasting time

    Eric

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Forever West
    Posts
    2,137
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 266 Times in 255 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by EricAker1 View Post
    I have a Windows 10 system with 2 SSDs. I would like to reduce the time for a backup. I like to keep the two backups separate.
    I would like to back up disk 1 onto disk 2 then copy that backup to a spinning disk (and delete it) then
    backup disk 2 to disk 1, and copy that to spinning disk.

    I use windows 10 backup in command line mode. What files must I copy?

    Am I doing something 1) stupid 2) crazy 3) just wasting time

    Eric
    Some folks would say the answer to the last question would be Yes, I'll only point out that the more one copies the same data to different disks the more likely there may be some data loss or corruption. Are you trying to back up the boot/system drive? I think most folks would agree that using a program such as Acronis True Image or Macrium Reflect [spelling?] would be the better way to go.

  3. #3
    5 Star Lounger Lugh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Indy
    Posts
    665
    Thanks
    185
    Thanked 80 Times in 70 Posts
    1. Make disk images of your OS and Programs drive, via Berton's suggestions.
    2. Do a regular file copy or backup of your data drive--I haven't tried Win10's backup, I use COMODO Backup since it has a copy function which avoids the danger of a restore not working.

    No need to involve the other SSD, do your stuff straight to the HD and/or external drive.
    Lugh.
    ~
    Windows 10 Pro x64 1607; Office 2016 (365 Home) x32; Win Defender, MBAM Pro

    ASRock H97 Anniversary; Xeon E3-1231V3 (like i7)
    Gigabyte GeForce GTX 970; 12GB Crucial DDR3 1600
    Logitech MX Master mouse; Roccat Isku kb

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,837
    Thanks
    105
    Thanked 138 Times in 135 Posts
    I recommend weekly or bi-monthly making a full image of your OS partition and your data partition onto two separate usb external HDs, or any two external medias of your choice, afterwards disconnecting the backup drives/devices and storing them in a small fire-repellent safe.
    Saving time does not necessarily equal quality backups, maybe it might, maybe it might not.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  5. #5
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,522
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 1,038 Times in 966 Posts
    I backup my Windows disk to an internal disk using a 3rd party backup. Then I copy the backup to an external disk. This way I have 2 copies of my backup, just in case.

    cheers, Paul

  6. #6
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,315
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 337 Times in 292 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    I backup my Windows disk to an internal disk using a 3rd party backup. Then I copy the backup to an external disk. This way I have 2 copies of my backup, just in case....
    Same here. Much easier, and more time-efficient, to restore the latest backup image if necessary (but that has only been necessary on one occasion since July 2015 after Win10 Insider Preview's "Fast Startup" feature messed up my other partitions).
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    Confuscius said: "no use running harder if you're on the wrong road" and "any problem once correctly understood is already half-solved".

  7. #7
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,837
    Thanks
    105
    Thanked 138 Times in 135 Posts
    Guys, Gals, here's a question for those who copy the just-made backup image to another external media: What are you going to do if the image, the just-made backup file, happens to be corrupt internally, either by a hiccup on the first backup location [media] or by a hiccup during the making of that first backup? IMO, making two "live" or external-boot full image backups, one onto ext HD A, then again onto ext HD B, while it takes more time to be sure!, also takes one more possible Murphy Law out of the equation [the Murphy Law that says: 1st backup file's internally corrupt, therefore the 2nd backup file, being a copy of said 1st backup file, is also corrupt.
    Last edited by RolandJS; 2016-07-16 at 08:16.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  8. #8
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,837
    Thanks
    105
    Thanked 138 Times in 135 Posts
    Anybody wanting a set of 2nd opinions and experiences of others, check out BleepingComputer.com's backup/disk mgt forum -- ask around.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  9. #9
    WS Lounge VIP access-mdb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Oxfordshire, UK
    Posts
    1,857
    Thanks
    153
    Thanked 176 Times in 169 Posts
    Roland #7 is a valid point. However, Macrium Reflect has a verify option and that should indicate if the backup is good or not (I suspect other imaging programs do as well). The problem is, where do you draw the line? Every copying/moving of a file might introduce a corruption, but I suspect that this is far more rare than a failing disk taking all your files down.
    As I think you said in another thread, we are are all different and choose our own method of working. Some are more paranoid than others; me, I'm not. Now to investigate that funny rattle.....
    Reality failure. Press enter to continuum

  10. #10
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Marietta, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    303
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by access-mdb View Post
    Roland #7 is a valid point. However, Macrium Reflect has a verify option and that should indicate if the backup is good or not (I suspect other imaging programs do as well).
    I use Acronis True Image, and assume that its "verify option" works properly. I've never had a problem trying to restore any of the images that I copied to my external drive.
    Rick Groszkiewicz
    Life is too short to drink bad wine (or bad coffee!)

  11. #11
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,522
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 1,038 Times in 966 Posts
    I don't use the verify option and have never had an issue recovering data - Windows doesn't corrupt my data on disk so why should the backup? Besides, I have more than 1 backup.

    cheers, Paul

  12. #12
    5 Star Lounger Lugh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Indy
    Posts
    665
    Thanks
    185
    Thanked 80 Times in 70 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    I backup my Windows disk to an internal disk using a 3rd party backup. Then I copy the backup to an external disk.
    Same here.
    Quote Originally Posted by RolandJS View Post
    What are you going to do if the image, the just-made backup file, happens to be corrupt internally, either by a hiccup on the first backup location [media] or by a hiccup during the making of that first backup?
    Two things:

    1 [>99% probability] Never know about it because any need to restore didn't happen on the corrupt backup's watch;

    2 [<1% chance] Restore the previous backup instead, if current one was corrupt when needed. Quite rare, and relatively minor inconvenience.
    Last edited by Lugh; 2016-07-17 at 03:33.
    Lugh.
    ~
    Windows 10 Pro x64 1607; Office 2016 (365 Home) x32; Win Defender, MBAM Pro

    ASRock H97 Anniversary; Xeon E3-1231V3 (like i7)
    Gigabyte GeForce GTX 970; 12GB Crucial DDR3 1600
    Logitech MX Master mouse; Roccat Isku kb

  13. #13
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Polk County, Florida
    Posts
    3,803
    Thanks
    27
    Thanked 435 Times in 345 Posts
    I always use the verify option. But the only way to truly verify a drive image is to restore it back to the drive. I do this from time to time (I have multiple backup images) just to confirm my trust in my imaging software. It hasn't let me down yet.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  14. #14
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    823
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 44 Times in 34 Posts
    I use Acronis TI 2016 and had a big scare several months ago: "Verify" did not pick up any errors after a full system backup; but when I tried to perform a test recovery (to a spare HDD temporarily substituted for my usual OS drive), I got an error message that there were "disk errors" in the backup image and that it could not be recovered. I then ran CHKDSK /r on my main OS drive and errors were discovered and repaired. I then created a fresh backup image and was able to recover it to my test HDD. So, it seems "verify" merely checks that all files in the backup are correct, but cannot pick up disk errors on the source disk. I seem to recall this matter being discussed elsewhere in the Lounge and someone reporting that Macrium Reflect is able to make allowances for disk errors when backing up; and that Acronis TI (apparently) can not ...This seems to have been confirmed in my case.

    Edit: By the way, I used an Acronis TI Recovery Disk (that had worked just fine in the past) for the recovery of both backups mentioned above.
    Last edited by petesmst; 2016-07-20 at 05:39. Reason: Added last paragraph
    (My Setup: Custom built: 4.00GHz Intel Core i7-6700K CPU; MSI Z170A Gaming Carbon Mobo (Military Class V); Win 10 Pro (64 bit)-(UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 500GB SAMSUNG 960 EVO M.2 NVME SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; 2 X GeForceGTX 1070 8GB Graphics Card (SLI); Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2017 Premium, Norton Internet Security, VMWare Workstation12 Pro). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  15. #15
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California, USA
    Posts
    756
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 81 Times in 79 Posts
    IIRC, EaseUs ToDo backup does a disk check BEFORE performing a backup.

    Zig

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •