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  1. #1
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    Visual Basic References or Text

    I had a need for Visual Basic in 1996-7. I decided not to learn it because MiniSquashed had stated that they would no longer support it in the next release of MS Office. It was supposed to die. Since it seems to have a life of its own, can anyone recommend a website, book, or other source of information that can tell me what I will need to know to use it?

  2. #2
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    Twenty years is a long time to wait for something you need. Congratulations on your impressive patience. This was also the time that MS was introducing VBA and phasing out WordBasic so I'm thinking perhaps your memory is not crystal clear over things you were told back then.

    I guess the question is... What do you want to do with Visual Basic? There are many places to start but we need to know where you want to go before we can tell you which path to take.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    What version of VB? 6? .NET?

    If VB6 then the 2 books I found most useful were:

    Sybex - Visual Basic 6 Complete (Sybex is now Wiley but it looks like the examples can still be downloaded.)
    Que - Practical Visual Basic 6 (complete with CD) - Code examples download still available.

    VB6 add-ins are still available from this VB6 site.

    Hope this helps...

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    AuBuchon (2016-07-17)

  5. #4
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    Thank you.

    I really didn't wait 20 years. The original need has long since been solved by other means.
    In the interim, I have occasionally wished that I had it, but since I never saw any Microsoft descriptions of it, I always feared it was about to die. I was by no means certain of that, but alway had a need that would not admit the chance.

    I have never wanted it for use in Word. I have often wanted a programming language of some sort that could be used within Excel. I don't have an immediate need, but have wished for it often enough that I am sure I will wish for it again. This time I would like to prepare before I need it.

    Jim AuBuchon

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    Thank you. I will have a look at them.

    Jim AuBuchon

  7. #6
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    I apologize if I reply to this twice. I don't see my original reply, so I must have failed to click the "reply" button.

    Thank you for your response.

    I wish that I had that kind of patience, but the original need was satisfied by other means.
    I have had no need for WordBasic or VBA in Word. I have have frequently wished for some sort of programming language that I could use in Excel.

    I have no immediate need. This time I wish to prepare before the need arises.

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    Excel uses Visual Basic for Applications. This is an application-specific dialect of Visual Basic (ie follows the same rules but includes terminology specific to the application). If you want to learn VB specifically for use in Excel then you should find resources specific to that. If you have no prior programming knowledge then it might be worthwhile to get some beginner information under your belt first. You can use google for that to find stuff like this or more advanced tutorials.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1vdt0FddsE

    Personally, I've learnt coding in excel from recording macros and using code samples gleaned from the 'net. There is masses of sample code available online so I prefer to learn while solving real-world problems rather than cluttering my limited brain capacity with 'hello world' exercises in the hope that I can apply something like that one day. Some of the real Excel gurus have both websites with VBA resources and produce books to help you learn. John Walkenbach is one such guru.
    http://spreadsheetpage.com

    Once you have the basic understanding of how to create, edit and run macros in excel, you can read through the various Excel VBA user forums to see what sorts of problems people have and how they can be solved with Excel's VBA. If you see something that might be useful to you, you can then play with the code and adapt it to suit your needs. All of this becomes useful information that shows you what can be achieved and how VBA can be used for your own work.

    The great benefit of exploring Excel VBA forums is not necessarily remembering HOW to do something but in knowing WHAT CAN BE DONE and where to look to find an answer.
    Last edited by Andrew Lockton; 2016-07-17 at 21:18.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

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    AuBuchon (2016-07-19)

  10. #8
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AuBuchon
    I have often wanted a programming language of some sort that could be used within Excel.
    My apologies. From your first post I thought you meant Visual Basic (even though your thread's in the Visual Basic for Applications forum).

    However, your second post has clarified that you did mean Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), which is different to Visual Basic (VB). Although there are many similarities - syntax, for example - it's probably best for your purposes to think of them separately.

    (Have a look at this article - Difference Between VB and VBA - for more info.)

    Funnily enough, one of the best books I bought about VBA remains Wiley - VBA for Dummies, 4th Edition. (I have a fondness for the 'Dummies' books... IMO they're very easy to read, easy to jump into at any point and usually have loads of useful examples.) I found I used this book far more often in the beginning than any of the other weightier tomes I bought.

    You may find Wiley - Excel VBA Programming For Dummies even better.

    Hope this helps...

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    AuBuchon (2016-07-19)

  12. #9
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    Thank you. This will be helpful.
    I am comfortable with the nature of computer programming. Though I am primarily a physicist, early in my career, I programmed extensively in several high level and several assembly and machine languages.
    I just need some place to start, and I think that you have given me that.

    Jim AuBuchon

  13. #10
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    Thank you. This is the kind of thing that I hoped for. I'm sure it will be helpful.

    Jim AuBuchon

  14. #11
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    in Excel, you can learn quite a lot (if only how bad the macro recorder is at doing what you want) by recording code and then working out what it does (and which bits you actually needed to keep - smallscroll can go!!)

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