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  1. #1
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    Office 365 vs. Office 2007 - work process differences, if any

    On the Windows 7 threads, I have detailed how I have migrated my daughter's old laptop to a new laptop, running Windows 7. I used PCmover, and this community helped greatly with help along the way.

    Her new laptop comes with a trial subscription to Office 365, and she used Office 2007 on her old computer (which BTW was the only software that PCmover didn't migrate over.)

    That leads to my question here as indicated in the title. I'm an "old foggie" who still uses Office 2007 himself, so I am unfamiliar with working "in the cloud."

    If my daughter chooses to go with Office 365 what changes as far as her work processes?

    For example, if she creates a spreadsheet can she keep it on her machine, or is everything done "in the cloud."

    Basically, I'm trying to understand any differences working with Office 365 compared to Office 2007.

    Thanks for any help offered,
    Dick

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    I did ponder this some myself and am not entirely clear on some points and am quite interested to hear what others say.

    It's my understanding that Office 365 is something of a hybrid design. It can store locally and in the cloud. If it's anything like the OneNote 2016 I looked into, you have a working copy of the document locally plus the cloud copy that's updated from the local version. This allows you to work offline if you need and to create copies you can give to others.

    I'm not at all clear how it deals with documents on a server. And I also am unclear on how this is functionally different from working with documents stored in a OneDrive folder locally, since they will also be copied to the cloud automatically.

    The one difference I am aware of is that Office 365 is treated much like Win10 is when it comes to updates. It will be updated regularly and new features added as they become available. This is also paid for by subscription rather than one lump sum payment.
    Last edited by gsmith-plm; 2016-08-15 at 08:25.
    Graham Smith
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    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

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    Office 2007 already uses the ribbon, so in that sense, she shouldn't find that many differences if she resorts to use Office 2016.

    With Office 2016 you can do everything you did with Office 2007. That means that you can save all your files locally, as you did before. You can also save them online, in OneDrive, if you prefer, but you don't need to change if you don't want to - I save most my stuff locally, as I always did, the only exception being OneNote, to make it easier to access my notes from everywhere, including my phone.

    My wife used Office 2007 up to a couple months ago and I used to help her with a thing or two, mainly on Word and Excel (and Outlook, at times). I am sure there are differences, but from a regular usage perspective, jumping from Office 2016 to her Office 2007 wasn't really "noticeable". The Outlook UI probably the one that has more differences between the versions, but the 2016 UI is definitely better, IMO.

    HTH.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    If it's anything like the OneNote 2016 I looked into, you have a working copy of the document locally plus the cloud copy that's updated from the local version.
    This is incorrect in what applies to Word, Excel and Powerpoint. What you described is correct regarding OneNote, but that is how OneNote works by default, in the free version, where you need to keep your OneNote documents in the cloud. For OneNote from a subscribed Office version, you can create OneNote documents that are located on your computer, with no cloud storage at all.

    For Word, Excel and Powerpoint, you can have all your documents local. In such a case, they will all be local and OneDrive won't be involved at all. I do not login to OneDrive on my Windows 10 machines, which means the OneDrive app does not touch my documents. I backup to OneDrive when I want to, through a 3rd party app, which keeps me free from all the hassle of the OneDrive app, which I hate with a vengeance - I can still have my OneNote documents stored in my OneDrive, even with the OneDrive app virtually disabled.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    This is incorrect in what applies to Word, Excel and Powerpoint.
    It's so difficult to sort out reality from marketing hype. The impression I got from reading about the advantages of Office365 were that cloud storage was part and parcel of the package. That it was somehow connected to the net in the same way that OneNote2016 was.
    Graham Smith
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    Is Office 365 (rented) the same as Office 2016?

    Dick

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    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    It's so difficult to sort out reality from marketing hype. The impression I got from reading about the advantages of Office365 were that cloud storage was part and parcel of the package. That it was somehow connected to the net in the same way that OneNote2016 was.
    No difficulty at all, when you use the actual product (let's not muddle the analysis with free products, there isn't a free Office offering for local installation, other than an individual application, that I know of - there are no free, locally installable versions of Word, Excel or PowerPoint).

    Also, it wouldn't be acceptable to impose mandatory cloud storage to paid customers. It would be nothing but suicidal. Offering it as an optional feature, though, makes total sense. Depending on your use cases, cooperative access to documents can be really interesting.

    Also, Office365 is just the name of the "mechanism" you use to buy Office - and you get some additional benefits other than Office itself, like 1TB OneDrive storage and Skype free minutes. You still get an Office version to install that is the same as before: previously Office 2013, now Office 2016, in a near future, surely something similar. So, we are still talking about Office features, not Office365 features.

    Yes, Office 2016 allows cooperative editing of Word and Excel documents and OneDrive storage, but the old local storage based features are still present. Again, OneNote is / was different from the other Office apps right from the beginning. In terms of cooperative features, all other Office apps have been playing catchup. I really don't want to launch additional confusion, but you could share OneNote documents between computers in local network since 2005 (started using OneNote back then) and it already kept a copy of the document locally, even when the original document was on another networked computer. So that behavior is tied to the cooperative nature of OneNote (for obvious performance reasons) and not to the fact that OneNote does that when the document is stored in OneDrive - in fact, such behavior is an extension of an existing behavior that was present even when there wasn't yet a SkyDrive, the precursor to OneDrive.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    Is Office 365 (rented) the same as Office 2016?

    Dick
    Office 365 is just a way to buy the latest Office version. What you get to install is the latest Office version which, at the moment, is Office 2016.
    To put it in a slightly different way you subscribe to Office365 and get Office 2016 to install. Your office version will be automatically upgraded whenever there is a new Office version, as long as your subscription is active. When the subscription expires, Office will work in read only mode - you lose the ability to create new documents and, of course, there will be no more Office upgrades.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    Is Office 365 (rented) the same as Office 2016?
    If you mean functionally, then my understanding is yes. However, what you get for programs depends on which version.

    The basic version of Office2016 Home is Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote. It's for a single computer and has a one time price of $150 (altho I've seen it for sale for $120).

    The basic version of Office365 is also for one computer and runs $70 per year but adds Outlook, Publisher, Access and 1TB of OneDrive space.

    There is also a $100 per year version of Office365 that's good for up to 5 computers with the above features.

    If any of that makes a difference, then it's worth looking at Office365.
    Graham Smith
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    One final question (I hope):

    Assume my daughter has lots of Word and Excel 2007 files that have been migrated over by PCmover.

    If she were to "rent" Office 365, would there be downward and upward compatibility between her 2007 files and the Office 365 format?

    As always, thank you.

    Dick

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    Yes, in general. If you use a feature that is new since Office 2007 then it won't work on Office 2007 but should still be basically compatible.

    I suggest you review Office 365 Home. That is the service I'd recommend for a family. You can install on up to 5 PCs or Macs, 5 tablets, & 5 phones. So, if you care to you can upgrade yourself too.
    Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    One final question (I hope):

    Assume my daughter has lots of Word and Excel 2007 files that have been migrated over by PCmover.

    If she were to "rent" Office 365, would there be downward and upward compatibility between her 2007 files and the Office 365 format?

    As always, thank you.

    Dick
    I don't think there have been any format changes in Office files between 2007 and 2016.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    One final question (I hope):

    Assume my daughter has lots of Word and Excel 2007 files that have been migrated over by PCmover.

    If she were to "rent" Office 365, would there be downward and upward compatibility between her 2007 files and the Office 365 format?

    As always, thank you.

    Dick
    As others pointed out, Office 365 is not a version in that same way Office 2007 is a version. It's more a licence type or a way of buying the product. The reason I point this out is that there is no 365 format or file type. They are still Office 2007 or 2013 or whatever the case might be. Currently you would get Office 2016 which, as others have pointed out, is the same as Office 2007.

    That is one of the reasons you might decide to get a subscription as opposed to buying it outright. You get new versions as they are released for no extra charge. Still, that's a decision you have to make. Do I subscribe and keep up with new versions, or do I pay once and have to pay again to update.

    Some of the confusion around Office 365 is because there are essentially two versions of each application like Word and Excel.

    There's an online version that you don't need to install on your PC and which you can access from anywhere. These are cut-down (some would say brain-damaged) versions of the applications that run in your browser. They are OK for basic editing and viewing files, but you will start to find their limitations if you do more than the basic.

    Then you have the full versions of each application that you install on your PC. Once they're installed they look and work like any recent version of Office. You have to go through the same kind of install process as previous versions, and it can take a while if your internet speed is not great.

    I hope that clears up some of the confusion.

  21. #14
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    Not to add to an already confused situation, but if you don't already own Office and are not tied to it for some reason, there's always open source applications like LibreOffice. These read and write to standard Office formats as well as open source formats. I started a rather lengthy topic on this a while back.
    Graham Smith
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    Dogknees:
    Thank you for such a clear explanation. That helps a lot.
    Dick

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