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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    Anniversary Update Issues: Forgive My Ignorance, but ...

    I am surprised by the number of issues users have been experiencing with the Anniversary Update (AU) to Windows 10. Why am I surprised? Well, I understood the Windows Insider Program to exist, amongst other things, to enable changes to Windows to be tested by a wide range of different users on a wide range of different machines with differing drivers, installed Apps, etc with a view to the next general-use roll-out

    How is it, then, that a largely fully functional build of Windows 10 can develop so many "glitches" when it launches as the AU? Right up until the last cumulative update of the previous build, the installation and other issues being reported here in the Lounge had virtually dwindled to a tiny trickle of relatively minor complaints.

    Then, "wham!" the AU arrives and it's as if the upgrade saga from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 began to repeat itself. Suddenly we see reports of installation hangs, drivers no-longer functioning, displays going "blank", systems "freezing", etc, etc.

    It seems MS has made significant changes between the previous fully updated/patched build and the AU; and it seems that the changes had not been fully tested in the Insider Program before releasing the AU. Why not?

    (My Setup: Custom built: 3,70GHz Intel Core i7-4820K CPU; MSI Military Class iii X79A-GD45 Plus Motherboard; Win 10 Pro (64 bit) - (UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; GeForceGTX 980 4GB Graphics Card; Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2015 Premium, NIS 2016, VMWare Workstation12 Pro, etc). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    Good question for MS since none of us know the answer.

  3. #3
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    I don't see this as any more problematic than any other major OS upgrade (which is what it is regardless of what Microsoft calls it). There are many, many different combinations of hardware and software in the Windows world. It is impossible to test all the variants that exist even with a program as large as the Insider Preview program. Then there are the users acting in unknown ways to add more mystery to the whole situation. All that means there is no way for any testing program to fully test every possibility.

    It is important to remember that in forums the vast majority of what is seen are problems. Hardly anyone who upgraded successfully and has been running well since then has posted that. Unfortunately, only Microsoft has any idea of the percentage of upgraders that have run into problems and they are not going to be specific about issues.
    Joe

  4. #4
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Pete,

    Also remember it is those who have problems who complain. If you don't have a problem you usually remain silent. Remember the "Silent Majority!"

    Personally, I've upgraded one desktop and 3 laptops w/o a problem. One of the laptops was even a dual boot system again w/o problem. I also upgraded my Sister-in-law's machine from 7 to Win 10 and then the AU via TeamViewer (South Carolina to Pennsylvania) again w/o incident. So personally I'm giving MS an A+ on this one. As always YMMV!

    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

    My Systems: Desktop Specs
    Laptop Specs

  5. #5
    New Lounger
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    I normally would agree with JoeP517 and RetiredGeek but in my case I have a Surface Pro 4 that took the up grade but it was so full of problems that I rolled it back. My Surface doesn't have anything installed on it that is out of the ordinary but it's hooked to there Dock which shouldn't be a problem. Funny thing is I'm an insider and I never had nothing but minor complaints with each update (running in a hyper-v machine on the pro) until last month and it refused to update and it time bombed out before I could get it to install. I don't understand why they couldn't get it right on there own hardware.

  6. #6
    4 Star Lounger
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    +1 for the (normally) Silent Majority.
    Since August of 2015 I've assisted in the upgrade of computers to Windows 10 which were previously running Windows 7, some running Windows 8, some 8.1 and I've even wiped the hard drive on more than a handful of Vista systems then installed Windows 10 from scratch. I wiped two computers which were Windows XP and installed Windows 10 on them, too (obviously their hardware was a cut above most other XP era models!).
    I can truthfully say that there have only been four of all those "50+" computers which had major problems during. or after, the move to Windows 10. Those problems were resolved eventually by new drivers, or new video cards, or additional memory, or by a clean install.
    Having made that statement, I am sure that something will soon rear its ugly head to bite me, but at this point I'm still impressed by what Microsoft has accomplished. I am very surprised that I haven't seen far more problems.

    Ron1946,
    I agree that Microsoft ought to have gotten "it right" especially on their own hardware. Did you contact Microsoft support during your trouble?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron1946 View Post
    I normally would agree with JoeP517 and RetiredGeek but in my case I have a Surface Pro 4 that took the up grade but it was so full of problems that I rolled it back. My Surface doesn't have anything installed on it that is out of the ordinary but it's hooked to there Dock which shouldn't be a problem. Funny thing is I'm an insider and I never had nothing but minor complaints with each update (running in a hyper-v machine on the pro) until last month and it refused to update and it time bombed out before I could get it to install. I don't understand why they couldn't get it right on there own hardware.
    While what you have installed may individually be of no consequence it could be a combination of what is installed or it could have been the sequence of installation. It could be that you are running it in Hyper-V. It might be the dock. Did you remove it from the dock before you attempted the upgrade? Do you have all the latest firmware updates installed? Did you try the upgrade using the Media Creation Tool?
    Joe

  8. #8
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    @JoeP517 and @RetiredGeek: I agree with you Joe and RG; but I think the significant difference with Windows 10 is the fact that updates (even to a New Build) are essentially compulsory and, unless you remain off-line, inevitable. It is true that one can "roll back" if an update causes problems (assuming you can reboot!), but soon after doing so, Windows Update will once again download and install the problem update.

    With regard to only those who have problems complaining and therefore many more clearly not having problems; I once again agree, but (tongue-in-cheek) note that most major media outlets in the US regard the receipt of 10 (or more) complaints about a specific event to be representative of a "significantly large" pool of dissatisfaction, and therefore deserving of corrective action (the presumption being that the majority of people find formally complaining to be too much of a hassle!!)

    That being said, I enjoy Windows 10, also use "Insider" on a second (VM) machine; and have personally not experienced any major/significant issues with it. Nevertheless, being essentially "forced" to upgrade when crippling of one's system may result (even if only for a small percentage of users) is, in my opinion not a good position for users to be placed in.
    Last edited by petesmst; 2016-08-19 at 05:46. Reason: Corrected a typo
    (My Setup: Custom built: 3,70GHz Intel Core i7-4820K CPU; MSI Military Class iii X79A-GD45 Plus Motherboard; Win 10 Pro (64 bit) - (UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; GeForceGTX 980 4GB Graphics Card; Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2015 Premium, NIS 2016, VMWare Workstation12 Pro, etc). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  9. #9
    New Lounger
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    RockE,
    I haven't contacted Microsoft on this as I didn't have the time to mess with it. I'm now waiting for the slow ring update to see if it makes a difference and I'll tackle it then.
    JoeP517,
    Normally I would agree with you on the software install as I have seen this before but this machine only has Office on a factory install and a couple of windows store programs.
    This is the base Factory install and it's not running in a hyper-v window. I do run 2 other installs in hyper-v windows (win 7 upgraded to win 10 32 bit and my insider preview machine 32 bit) but I have had no problems with them but I put the win7 upgrade to the slow ring also. The problems showed up when I wasn't running any hyper-v machines. The update was so problematic I never got to try the hyper-v windows.
    No I didn't remove the dock before the install and that occurred to me also that it might have been the problem.
    Yes all firmware and software updates were performed before I installed the AU update.

    I have to say this: The Surface Pro with the dock has become my go to computer. It's doing the job that was previously handled by a much larger desktop. I can use it as a desktop and in a second take it on the road. Version 1511 is stable and problem free so I'll wait a month or so to get the slow ring update.
    Thanks Guys for the Tips,
    Ron

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    A follow up on my previous posts. I had time Saturday to try again the AVU. I used the windows upgrade assistant this time. I also unhooked the surface dock and ran the upgrade and it came out OK. I then connected the dock with nothing hooked to it and waited a minute or so and then one by one hooked things to the docked waiting a minute in between. This all seems to have solved the problem as I have a stable machine now. I did have the sound not working problem. I deleted the sound drivers and restarted and that took care of it.
    Thanks,
    Ron

  11. #11
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    Great!!! Glad you got the upgrade installed. Thanks for posting back.
    Joe

  12. #12
    New Lounger
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    How many people on the Insider program run it in a live environment? I run mine as a VM. And how many of them would have kept the "original" version to update rather than taken the regular interim releases. I suspect that the update from the standard release is almost untested by the Insider process which is designed to look at the functionality of the release, not the update process. This may in fact be part of the problem, Microsoft assuming that they don't need to put the efffort into testing the updating process because it would come out through the Insider feedback. Personally I am pleased that some people were actually able to roll back - I had to do a clean install!

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