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  1. #1
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    Keyboard and Mouse NOT WORKING

    have a three year old dell inspron desktop running updated windows 8.1 64bit. Suddenly NONE of the input devices are working. I've tried several different wired and wireless keyboard and mice. NOTHING. I've tried using different ports (both on the computer on on my splitter) I've tried unhooking both devices, rebooting, then hooking them back up... looks like its loading drivers, makes noise, but still nothing. Tried rebooting with them installed. ARRRGGGHHH. Since I have no keyboard I can't do safe start (don't even know if that works with windows8 ).
    I do have a "repair disk" that I created when the computer was new.... tried rebooting with it in the drive.... didn't do anything other than restart the computer with the same non-functioning input devices.
    I hear my external hard drive working... so it must be doing something... so I guess its not all USB devices that are down. And the computer "dings" when I try to attach either to a usb port.
    I did install new logitech software last week, but it worked fine for several days, just quit working when it woke from sleep. I'd love to uninstall the logitech and go back with standard (functioning drivers), or do a system restore, but I can't do that since the mouse is not working.
    Any suggestions/help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I've come across where the affected machine was remote connected from another, but don't know if you will be able to do this as you won't be able to set up the target machine - perhaps someone else may have a suggestion.

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/...top-connection

    I suppose you could contact Dell support and hope they have a fix in their script.

  3. #3
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Plug a known good kb into the usb you think is working and try to get into bios. Check usb settings try same with another port. Then if u have a working port try a bootable cd or usb. This can eliminate a h/w only problem.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    You could try resetting the BIOS as that loads low level drivers, although I don't know why it should have become corrupt.

    On a Win 8 machine it would be unlikely that the CMOS battery would have run down, but checking that the clock is showing the correct date and time would be a good pointer.

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  6. #6
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    I agree that an OP should state if they have asked for help elsewhere and what has been suggested, but as none of those sources have been able to help, then it's quite natural to ask elsewhere.

  7. #7
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    This is a longshot, but if it works, you're in.

    It is possible that USB has "died" on your computer. This has happened to me twice, and it prevented my USB mouse and keyboard from working. Fortunately, in both cases there were PS/2 mouse and keyboard ports on the computer. By connecting a PS/2 mouse and keyboard, I was able to easily fix the problem.

    If you have PS/2 ports on the computer (doubtful, because your computer isn't very old), then find a PS/2 mouse and keyboard, power down, plug them in, and then power up. This should at least give you a mouse and keyboard; you will then be able to fix whatever is wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    I agree that an OP should state if they have asked for help elsewhere and what has been suggested, but as none of those sources have been able to help, then it's quite natural to ask elsewhere.
    Yes, that's what the rule says.

  9. #9
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    Red face

    Good suggestion from mrjimphelps.
    I've run into the very same problem on several desktop PC's (not so easy to fix on laptops) If the CMOS battery is dead, there's no boot data for the USB keyboard or mouse.
    It's easy to check if you have a meter. Place the POS probe to the battery that's exposed on the motherboard of your desktop PC and the NEG probe on any exposed metal. Your meter should tell you immediately what the CMOS battery voltage is...3volts is normal. If it's less than that expect BIOS boot problems.

    The battery is normally a CR2023 from any supermarket or PC store. If you don't have a meter, take the PC to your local computer tech and he can check it quickly.

    mrjimphelps suggestion to use a PS/2 mouse & PS/2 keyboard is also a good start point if your PC has them on the back of the machine. They are colour coded green and purple with symbols to indicate which is the keyboard socket and which is the mouse socket. Be gentle, the sockets are very easily damaged.. Good luck.

    Forgot to mention..
    It is possible your power supply is dead so there's no 5 volts or 12 volts for the motherboard or the USB 5 volts systems. Again easy to check with a meter and one of the power supply cables which support a hard disk drive. The 4 sockets on the end of a cable are black=Neg and the other's are yellow and red which should be giving 5 volts and 12 volts, which are not critical +/- 10%.
    Be careful you don't short circuit these socket pins when testing. The power supply doesn't like short circuits !

    Another possibility which will check that the power supply is OK, is the BIOS POST (Power on Self Test).

    If the POST test is good the PC (most of them) will give one ding ! If no ding's it could be mean either the MOBO or the power supply is the culprit. Any more ding's than one, (both short and long ding's) indicate other problems which means you need to google the BIOS maker & find out what the number of ding's you heard..mean. You need to count them carefully. A wrong count is very misleading.
    Last edited by huntsman; 2016-08-25 at 12:26. Reason: Another possibility !

  10. #10
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    Sorry I think you mean a CR2032 battery? Last two #'s mixed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PvtBB View Post
    Sorry I think you mean a CR2032 battery? Last two #'s mixed.
    Your right. It's been a long day & it's late (2am) in Melbourne. Thanks for picking it up.

  12. #12
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huntsman View Post
    Good suggestion from mrjimphelps. I've run into the very same problem on several desktop PC's (not so easy to fix on laptops)...mrjimphelps suggestion to use a PS/2 mouse & PS/2 keyboard is also a good start point if your PC has them on the back of the machine. They are colour coded green and purple with symbols to indicate which is the keyboard socket and which is the mouse socket. Be gentle, the sockets are very easily damaged
    Actually, with a laptop you might get lucky, because a lot of docking stations have PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports. If USB ever dies on my Dell laptop, or if my keyboard and mouse ever fail for some other reason, I'll try to track down a docking station with PS/2 ports. I suspect, however, that with a laptop, the built-in keyboard and trackpad will continue to work even if USB dies.

    I wish that all computers would have PS/2 ports, or at least have PS/2 connectors on the motherboard. These ports come in really handy in an emergency.

    Quote Originally Posted by huntsman View Post
    If the CMOS battery is dead, there's no boot data for the USB keyboard or mouse. It's easy to check if you have a meter. Place the POS probe to the battery that's exposed on the motherboard of your desktop PC and the NEG probe on any exposed metal. Your meter should tell you immediately what the CMOS battery voltage is...3volts is normal. If it's less than that expect BIOS boot problems. The battery is normally a CR2023 from any supermarket or PC store. If you don't have a meter, take the PC to your local computer tech and he can check it quickly.
    One of my computers recently died. Wouldn't start for anything. Long story short, the CMOS battery was dead. When I replaced the battery, the machine fired right up.

    An analog multimeter costs around US$10, and is available in lots of stores. I have found that analog is a lot simpler and easier to use than digital. A multimeter is good to have, not only for troubleshooting computer issues, but for a whole lot of other issues as well.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2016-08-25 at 14:00.

  13. #13
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    Try the Windows Troubleshooter to Check the device
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...board-problems

    Or contact Dell support center is best way I think.

  14. #14
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    I am having that problem. I don't know if this is situation is the same. I am losing both mouse and keyboard each time I plug my fan into a USB port. When I remove it, the mouse and keyboard resume working. Are the other USB ports in use?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwolfe View Post
    I am having that problem. I don't know if this is situation is the same. I am losing both mouse and keyboard each time I plug my fan into a USB port. When I remove it, the mouse and keyboard resume working. Are the other USB ports in use?
    Has it always done that or previously worked - could be a PSU problem ?

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