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  1. #1
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    question. 10/100 router with gigabyte switch connected.

    Do devices connected to the switch communicate at gigabit speeds or are they limited by the router speed?
    Last edited by High Sierra; 2016-09-02 at 09:34. Reason: changed to bit.
    George

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    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Unfortunately these speeds are more in the realm of theoretical maximums rather than real-life results.

    The switch, the device's ethernet adapter and the connecting ethernet cable (CAT6 and short) would all have to be in perfect condition with no throttling (adapter settings, traffic shaping, CPU activity, AV monitoring, etc.) to a single endpoint to even come close to a sustained transfer rate at theoretical maximum speed.

    It's easier just to say that in perfect conditions and with good equipment the transfer rate should be much better than with 100 Mbps equipment. IMO, anyone who tells you differently is probably trying to sell you something.
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2016-09-01 at 18:53.

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    And just so you know it is Gigabit [Gbps]. 8 bits = 1 Byte

    Little known item: A nybble, sometimes spelled "nibble," is a set of four bits. Since there are eight bits in a byte, a nybble is half of one byte.
    Last edited by Berton; 2016-09-01 at 20:58.

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    For what it's worth, I agree with Rick and Berton.

    When you connect a bunch of ethernet devices together with a switch, they can communicate directly with each other. The throughput is determined by the least throughput of the switch (and by each individual device). So theoretically your devices might be able to communicate with each other at some throughput "approaching" the 1 gigabit per second rate.
    On the other hand, because the switch is connected to a router (which has a lower throughput than the switch) then all the communications between the switch and the router are limited by the router's specifications.

    So the short answer to your question is that your switch-connected devices may communicate with each other at something approaching a 1 gigabit rate, but those devices can only communicate to the internet at the much lower rate of your router (actually you're limited by the router, the modem, and your ISP's provisioning).

    Note that if you're "out in the boonies" (with an ADSL line perhaps), you could be using 1 gigabit equipment and yet you still might not get to/from the Internet at even 10 megabits per second!


    Here are some informative definitions from CISCO.
    Last edited by RockE; 2016-09-01 at 23:41. Reason: spelling

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    All switches and routers have limited throughput and generally the more money you spend the higher the throughput. A 4 port home switch may have a maximum throughput of 1Gb and an enterprise grade 48 port switch may have a throughput of 20Gb.

    cheers, Paul

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    None of those answers really answer what I thought was a simple question. RockE's answer is closest. I know that the stated speeds are theoretical maximums and that you really have top have good cables etc. I'm also not concerned with internet access for this question.

    The question I really want and answer to is"

    "does the speed of the router (10/100) control the speed of the devices connected to the gigabit switch?"

    I asked because it is my understanding that all the packets will have to travel through the router even if the devices are connected to the switch.
    George

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    Quote Originally Posted by High Sierra View Post
    "does the speed of the router (10/100) control the speed of the devices connected to the gigabit switch?"
    If I follow you, the answer is yes - sort of - for some things. I'm assuming that you have a router that connects to the WAN and then a switch (which is different than a hub) that your devices connect to.

    If you are talking about traffic that goes device to device, then that would go through the switch.. Anything going into or out of the WAN would go through the switch and the router.

    For all practical purposes, it's not going to matter that much because there are many things that effect speed.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

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    The answer is: only traffic destined for the internet will travel through the router. All internal traffic will be at switch speed. Traffic does not go through both unless it's going to a location that only the router is connected to.

    cheers, Paul

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    Could someone tell me the difference between a switch and a hub?

    The device I'm using is called a switch, but it's what is known as an un-managed switch.
    George

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    That was helpful, plus I decided not to be lazy and did a search for (managed switch vs unmanaged) on google and watched a few helpful videos.

    George

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    'Tis a pity they refer to mega bits and use the symbol for milli bits (Mb = mega bits, mb = milli bits).

    cheers, Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    'Tis a pity they refer to mega bits and use the symbol for milli bits (Mb = mega bits, mb = milli bits).

    cheers, Paul
    Just as bad is supposedly intelligent technology writers using B in descriptions when it obviously should be b. At least that was the way I learned it back in days of octols.

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    Octols?

  21. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Browni View Post
    Mistyped, should have been octals.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octal

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