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  1. #1
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    Thumbs up OpenDNS, Heimdal, and Trusteer Rapport

    I just got the new newsletter, and since the lead story is on "SECURITY", and I didn't see OpenDNS (now part of Cisco), Heimdal, or Trusteer Rapport mentioned, I thought I would. I use them and feel a lot better because of that. Believe it or not, my original reason for using OpenDNS was to keep myself from being tempted to visit certain "bad websites", so I utilized the filtering capabilities of OpenDNS to restrict my web surfing to productive endeavors. Needless to say, filtering is a very desirable capability. Protecting yourself and your entire network against ransomware is critical too, and that's why I use OpenDNS. I want all the protection I can get, and you can be sure OpenDNS is on security problems like flies on you-know-what! https://www.opendns.com

    I also am checking out Heimdal. It seems like a really good program, and it updates certain software too, all in the name of 'good as it can be', up to date security. https://heimdalsecurity.com/en/

    Trusteer Rapport is good too. https://www.trusteer.com/ProtectYourMoney

    So here are three free things (that I recommend) that we can use to be more safe and secure on the 'net. I also backup to a portable 1TB hard drive, and disconnect it when the backup has completed.

    Have a great day...

  2. #2
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Trusteer Rapport used to have a very bad reputation for slowing down PCs and causing unexpected crashes.
    They may have overcome these problems...
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

  3. #3
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    I agree that OpenDNS and other 'safe' DNS offerings should have been worthy of a mention.

    I'm not so sure on Heimdal, I didn't like the previous Free version(s), I'm just installing the latest Free version as Monitor-only for a quick check (initial thoughts, not great: "Recommended Software" includes most of the major malware targets, as well as older, vulnerable versions of Java - not good when the Free version doesn't have an active scanner. Main overview page smacks of 'scareware': big red ! "Your computer must be updated" alongside a confusing "0 software patches". Yes, it claims to have run a scan, warns me that my PC must be updated but can offer zero suggestions - very clever!?).

    Trusteer Rapport can be quite buggy, 'messing' with too many other legit. software, even to the point of causing BSODs. Better used only with very common software installed (which often means software that's more likely to be attacked by malware, see above) but best used on a PC that's only used for banking - high security, limited software installs and frequently patched (or boot from a Linux Live CD for banking only, easier and probably safer).

  4. #4
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    Thanks for all the information. Great feedback!

    BTW, according to Trusteer's Wikipedia page,
    "Trusteer Rapport is security software advertised as an additional layer of security to anti-virus software. It is designed to protect confidential data, such as account credentials, from being stolen by malicious software (malware) and via phishing. To achieve this goal, the software includes anti-phishing measures to protect against misdirection and attempts to prevent malicious screen scraping; it attempts to protect users against the following forms of attacks: man-in-the-browser, man-in-the-middle, session hijacking and screen capturing.[17]

    On installation, Rapport also tries to remove existing financial malware from end-user machines and to prevent future infection.[18] Trusteer Rapport is advertised to be compatible with Microsoft Windows (XP-SP3 and higher) and Mac OS X and can be downloaded free of charge.[19] Financial institutions offer the software free of charge with a view to making online banking safer for customers.[20][21]"


    Given the current state of digital malice, I am going to continue to use it, as I have experienced no serious problems as yet (that I can tell). I am also going to seriously consider Malwarebytes as an anti-ransomware solution (use it now), once the beta is "ready for prime-time". We nervous amateurs aren't exactly sure what is the best thing to do is, and if a little more protection is feasible, then full speed ahead!
    Last edited by keith9e; 2016-09-23 at 09:49. Reason: additional info.

  5. #5
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    I have since uninstalled Trusteer Rapport and also BitDefender, and installed Webroot SecureAnywhere because of its advertised ability to recover ransomware encrypted files. It appears to be a very robust security suite too, and I was able to buy it for $19.99 for a year of protection, so we'll see how it goes. Highly rated by PCMag.com so I couldn't resist. It even has a "Rootkit Shield" in addition to its "Realtime Shield" protection, and "Identity Protection" features. Mac version available too. Definitely worth checking out!

  6. #6
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    Recovering ransomware files is magic IMO. How do they claim to be able to do this?

    cheers, Paul

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul T For This Useful Post:

    Bambinoo (2016-09-29)

  8. #7
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    Well, according to Neil J. Rubenking's review of WSA on PCMag.com,

    "Webroot's journaling and rollback feature should be able to recover from almost any attack, even encrypting ransomware. In fact, the company devoted quite a bit of developer energy specifically to the ransomware problems. At Webroot HQ last year, I saw a live demo of the recovery process. That was impressive, but how much more so if I could demonstrate it for myself."

    "Webroot's cloud-based servers maintain a giant database of known programs, good and bad. Rather than maintain a local database, with all the headaches of keeping it up to date, your local Webroot installation queries that database about the programs it sees. If the program's legit, Webroot leaves it alone. If it's a known threat, Webroot cleans up its traces.

    What about unknown programs? This is where it gets interesting. When Webroot encounters an unknown program, it sends detailed telemetry to HQ for analysis, and starts monitoring that program. Every action by the suspect gets journaled for possible rollback. Of course, some events can't be rolled back. Transmitting data to an outside source is one example. Webroot doesn't let an unknown program perform that sort of action. Yes, that means a valid unknown program might not be fully functional for a while, but in truth, valid programs almost never spend time in monitoring limbo.

    In some cases, correlation rules let the server match the unknown app to an existing threat, resulting in a real-time response. In others, teams of human researchers around the globe dig into the unknown file. According to my Webroot contact, a weekly internal report shows that human analysis averages between 45 and 90 minutes.

    Once the program has been analyzed, the server notifies your local Webroot antivirus. If the program turns out to be legit, its probation ends. If not, Webroot terminates the program and reverses all of its actions. And if another user encounters that same now-known threat, Webroot can smack it down right away."


    Not quite magic, but rather excellent computer science! IMO, that's a great deal for $19.99, or even the regular price of $39.99. Check out the full article for all the details: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2470312,00.asp (And it's small and fast too!)

  9. #8
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keith9e View Post
    Believe it or not, my original reason for using OpenDNS was to keep myself from being tempted to visit certain "bad websites", so I utilized the filtering capabilities of OpenDNS to restrict my web surfing to productive endeavors. Needless to say, filtering is a very desirable capability.
    When you say "bad" websites, do you mean websites with malware and hackers, or do you mean websites containing porn, gambling, and other such things?

    If you are referring to porn and gambling, then I recommend American Family Online. (www.afo.net) As far as I know, they are the only remaining filtering service which protects against porn and other objectionable things, and which hasn't been bought out by a huge corporation. In my opinion, all of the other such services are in it for the money, whereas AFO is sincerely trying to protect the user from objectionable content.

  10. #9
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    Journalling will work nicely, but it does require lots of disk space. Luckily that's cheap.

    cheers, Paul

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    When you say "bad" websites, do you mean websites with malware and hackers, or do you mean websites containing porn, gambling, and other such things?
    Porno. I developed an addiction to it, but managed to get away from it, thank God, and have usually been able to maintain that, but sometimes I am tempted to visit those kinds of websites, so OpenDNS is good for that purpose. I did use a filted web service (forget the name) at one time, but I don't think I need such extreme measures now. I really love the fact that OpenDNS keeps me safe online from those with malicious intent. Thanks for the recommendation.

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