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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    word forms: tabbing and repeat entries

    Hi, using word 10. not too familiar with word forms and design mode, but have done a few forms and am getting ambitious.

    I have 2 things I can't figure out:
    1) How to have the user of the form simply tab to the next entry point

    2) Here is the scenario: I have contract for my customers, that I will fill out. The first line has a text form fill where i enter the customer's name. this customer name appears several times in the contract. Is there a way to identify the first field as, say the "customer field" and then in all other form fill areas where I want the customer's name to appear, it just populates off the first entry. i.e., not having to fill the customer's name out each time. There of course are other fields where i need to write something different, but the customer name field appears several times.


    Thanks everyone!

    Rick

  2. #2
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    There are numerous ways of going about this task. For a discussion, see: http://gregmaxey.mvps.org/word_tip_p...ting_data.html
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to macropod For This Useful Post:

    r9thomas (2016-10-04)

  4. #3
    Silver Lounger Charles Kenyon's Avatar
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    You need to use plain-text in preference to rich-text controls to be able to tab to the next field.

    See Repeating Data Using Document Properties and Mapped Content Controls and
    Repeating Data (more comprehensive)

    The first of these links explores one method from the second which is far more comprehensive. The second is the most comprehensive exploration of this problem that I know about. It is the same one that was linked by Paul.
    Last edited by Charles Kenyon; 2016-09-24 at 19:04.
    Charles Kyle Kenyon
    Madison, Wisconsin

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    r9thomas (2016-10-04)

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