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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    Is "Rolling Back" really a Solution?

    I keep seeing posts (here in the Lounge and elsewhere) by users that report loss of functionality after an update to Windows 10 (most frequently, it seems to be due to a driver no-longer functioning).

    In many forums (fora?!) users are advised to "roll back" to the previous version/build of Windows 10 if a recent update fails. Whilst this often works (but not always!), the problem the user then faces is that the next time Windows Update runs, the offending version is downloaded and installed again! Whilst there are a few tricks that one can use to delay updates, ultimately they will arrive, whether you want them or not (unless you isolate yourself from the Web permanently!)

    I have no idea how widespread these issues are, but they appear to be more prevalent with Windows 10 than with Windows 8.1 and earlier. I certainly never personally experienced my system being crippled by any in-build Windows updates to versions 8.1 and earlier. The only time I had a slight problem was when moving from Vista to 8, when an old version of Flight Simulator would no-longer run.

    So, what's the solution? I would welcome the input of The Wise!
    (My Setup: Custom built: 4.00GHz Intel Core i7-6700K CPU; MSI Z170A Gaming Carbon Motherboard (Military Class III); Win 10 Pro (64 bit)-(UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; 2 X GeForceGTX 1070 8GB Graphics Card (SLI); Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2017 Premium, Norton Internet Security, VMWare Workstation12 Pro). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  2. #2
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    I can't say that rolling back is always going to help but I've found that successfully 'rolling back' can provide another chance to upgrade (obviously?). I've done this with computers belonging to some of my clients. In each case that I've done that (on only a handful of computers) when I then used a newly prepared flash drive (using the Media Creation Tool) the re-try of upgrading has worked properly. In each case however (to the best of my recollection) the lag between the initial problem(s) and the attempt to reinstall has been a few days.
    Like I say, I don't know the "facts" but that has been my experience. (I have not had any problems updating/upgrading my own computers.)
    Last edited by RockE; 2016-09-30 at 18:12. Reason: grammar
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  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    Being in the Insider Program I probably use the rollback feature more than most and can confirm it does work!

    Recently I updated to build 14926 but it caused a lot of problems so I rolled back to build 14915. I wasn't prompted with another build until 14931 was released so it obviously knew I had problems and didn't re-offer me the problem build.

  4. #4
    3 Star Lounger djohnson's Avatar
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    If an insider update screws up I do not want to NOT use it. What I always do is create, or download an ISO of the update. I then mount it, and integrate my drivers which I have already exported to a folder. I then save it, unmount it, create bootable media, and do a clean install. I always have an alternate boot method on my computer. Right now I have another version of Windows 10 installed as a VHD on C drive, and I can boot into that to do my preparedness for clean install.

  5. #5
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    @Nrowni and @djohnson: Yes, I see the value for Insiders who find that an installation of a new build/update does not function in an acceptable manner; but I still have doubts about the dilemma faced by Non-Insider, "regular users" who are left crippled by an update that will simply be re-updated after a roll-back.
    (My Setup: Custom built: 4.00GHz Intel Core i7-6700K CPU; MSI Z170A Gaming Carbon Motherboard (Military Class III); Win 10 Pro (64 bit)-(UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; 2 X GeForceGTX 1070 8GB Graphics Card (SLI); Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2017 Premium, Norton Internet Security, VMWare Workstation12 Pro). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  6. #6
    3 Star Lounger djohnson's Avatar
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    Regular users get regular updates, not experimental ones. These updates are cumulative, and won't cripple a computer. Before the insiders program of course I got updates. I always looked forward to them, and was never, ever crippled or anything else by a regular update.

  7. #7
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    The point I was making is that bad updates once rolled back don't get re-offered.

  8. #8
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    @Browni: Not in my experience. I have tested my Insider (Fast Ring), in my VM setup, by rolling back several times over several months. Within 48 hours, in every case, the entire update that had been removed by the roll-back had been downloaded and re-installed as before. So my point is: If there had been something in the update that created new problems in the Windows installation; then rolling back would very likely correct things; but only until the offending update was re-installed via Update. So, as asked in my OP "Is Rolling Back really a solution?" (Even for those who are not Insiders).

    Incidentally post #2 here in the Lounge: http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...ws-Update-Woes is one of many examples that, IMHO, illustrates my point.
    Last edited by petesmst; 2016-10-01 at 06:33. Reason: Corrected a typo
    (My Setup: Custom built: 4.00GHz Intel Core i7-6700K CPU; MSI Z170A Gaming Carbon Motherboard (Military Class III); Win 10 Pro (64 bit)-(UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; 2 X GeForceGTX 1070 8GB Graphics Card (SLI); Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2017 Premium, Norton Internet Security, VMWare Workstation12 Pro). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

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