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  1. #1
    iNET Interactive
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    Taking out the trash: Mastering the Recycle Bin


    Best Practices

    Taking out the trash: Mastering the Recycle Bin


    By AUTHOR

    As most astute PC users know, when you delete a file, it typically remains in Windows' recycle bin until you empty the bin — or until the bin fills up with newer deleted files.

    But there are other ways to manage your file deletions — including bypassing the Recycle Bin altogether. These tips and tricks work with all current versions of Windows, unless otherwise noted.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/best-practices/taking-out-the-trash-mastering-the-recycle-bin/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    3 Star Lounger
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    Maybe something that you could have added is that even if a file is "deleted" and not sent to the Bin it is not necessarily gone for good. Simply running a recovery program, like Recuva, will find dozens, sometimes hundreds, of files, documents, images etc., some in perfect condition. If a laptop is lost or stolen a lot of information is potentially at risk. I use Explorer˛ by Zabkat, vastly better than Windows Explorer, and it has a very convenient "Shred" facility. Now that's deletion.

    David

  3. #3
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhinoceros View Post
    Maybe something that you could have added is that even if a file is "deleted" and not sent to the Bin it is not necessarily gone for good. Simply running a recovery program, like Recuva, will find dozens, sometimes hundreds, of files, documents, images etc., some in perfect condition. If a laptop is lost or stolen a lot of information is potentially at risk. I use Explorer˛ by Zabkat, vastly better than Windows Explorer, and it has a very convenient "Shred" facility. Now that's deletion.

    David
    That was briefly mentioned in the article. Thanks for the expanded information.
    -- Bob Primak --

  4. #4
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    I hope you don't think I'm being pedantic, but what the Michael Lasky said was:

    "Again, the obvious reason to have the recycle bin is to restore files and folders inadvertently and fairly recently deleted. The time the file was placed in the recycle bin is important; when the bin fills up, the oldest additions are "permanently" deleted to make room for new deletions." (emphasis added)

    This implies that after some time the files and the information contained in them are irretrievable. Anyone who thinks that should run Recuva, or some similar software. I have found hundreds of files in "Excellent condition: No overwritten sectors detected", many others in 'Poor condition', and of course many 'Unrecoverable'. This was on a 1TB drive months after some of them were "permanently deleted". I can only guess at what else an enthusiastic identity thief could have found. As far as I'm concerned the only way to delete is to shred.

    David

  5. #5
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    "...The time the file was placed in the recycle bin is important; when the bin fills up, the oldest additions are "permanently" deleted to make room for new deletions..."
    From Windows Internal's point of view, all of its pointers to a deleted file are gone. As Rhino said very well -- any 3rd party data recovery program can recover files not overwritten.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  6. #6
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhinoceros View Post
    I hope you don't think I'm being pedantic, but what the Michael Lasky said was:

    "Again, the obvious reason to have the recycle bin is to restore files and folders inadvertently and fairly recently deleted. The time the file was placed in the recycle bin is important; when the bin fills up, the oldest additions are "permanently" deleted to make room for new deletions." (emphasis added)

    This implies that after some time the files and the information contained in them are irretrievable. Anyone who thinks that should run Recuva, or some similar software. I have found hundreds of files in "Excellent condition: No overwritten sectors detected", many others in 'Poor condition', and of course many 'Unrecoverable'. This was on a 1TB drive months after some of them were "permanently deleted". I can only guess at what else an enthusiastic identity thief could have found. As far as I'm concerned the only way to delete is to shred.

    David
    Not pedantic at all. The additional information is appreciated.
    -- Bob Primak --

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