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  1. #1
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    Question A book called "The Scarecrow"... interestingly enough

    ...about, in the background but significant, identity theft, hacking, eamil subversion. Very interesting overall and a bit scary. I do not believe it is all as easy as the 'criminal' from "the Farm" suggests as he easily and quickly goes from one hack to another but frankly it made me check my home and office systems a bit. Comments in the book about a fake 'under construction' website connected to the killer showed how a 'honey pot' could be used to collect IP addresses and then backtrack to a degree that I think was probably embellished a bit... but again, intriguing. One by one he successfully breaks into the Los Angeles Times, into a bank, into a national phone carrier, so forth... using the computing power of a corporate "server farm" where the bosses have no idea. At any rate it is one of a few books that use the vulnerabilities of PC / Network use as a backdrop to violent crimes. There were no 'white hats' to prevent it... or at least as far as I've read. Easy passwords play a key role!

    So the question is... what is the best way to encrypt email without having to give a key to all your friends to read your emails.
    Do software firewalls server a real purpose (such as Windows 8 / 10 Firewall Control).
    What is the 'best' method of scanning for keyloggers (are they even used anymore?) or deeply imbedded theft softare (root kits? Can they be used in identity theft?)

    If you like a good mystery 'mixed' with some hacking, "The Scarecrow" is a good read... and caution.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roamingdoc2014 View Post
    So the question is... what is the best way to encrypt email without having to give a key to all your friends to read your emails.
    Without exchanging keys, how can a friend be different from an enemy?
    Last edited by BruceR; 2016-10-15 at 16:55. Reason: to/from

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roamingdoc2014
    If you like a good mystery 'mixed' with some hacking, "The Scarecrow" is a good read... and caution.
    ... especially as it's nearly 8 years old now (if you mean the Michael Connelly novel) and, IMO, almost prophetic.

  4. #4
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    LuxSci?

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    I read most of his Bosch novels but missed some of the others (Blood Work, Poet, The Scarecrow) until more recently. But it is interesting given Wikileaks and Julian Assange, Clinton's "no emails" email server. I definitely try to lock down my home system/network... prophetic is right.

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    5 Star Lounger Lugh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roamingdoc2014 View Post
    LuxSci?
    That's only for business, and probably quite expensive--never a good sign when there are no prices easily accessible on the site.
    Lugh.
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  7. #7
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    Not promoting LuxSci but they do not require a 'key' for the email to be read by a recipient. Prices are not bad (we have 33 licenses and it is under $140 / month - yes, definitely a business prop but I wonder if five or more who wanted 'secure' emails between them (it is like $4/person/month) opened an account. Oh well... the Scarecrow is just a figment, right?

    ;^0

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roamingdoc2014 View Post
    Not promoting LuxSci but they do not require a 'key' for the email to be read by a recipient.
    The only option they have which doesn't require a recipient to have a key requires them to answer a pre-defined question at a webmail portal instead; not much difference really.

  9. #9
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    Actually only if the 'recipients' domain doesn't support SSL... however if a group did decide to go this direction (as a group) then there is no requirement to answer anything. It is all encrypted. We also tried a texting encryption program for security. We tried Signal. Ouch. Was and is a neat program but some interesting twists on group sends and also 'secure' recovering of texts... I use both Signal and LuxSci in a work environment. At home I secure with three different programs (and in settings told to leave each other alone) but still think about security. Thanks

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