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  1. #1
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    The end of Windows' dominance on the corporate desktop

    This could spell the end of Windows' dominance on the corporate desktop.

    "IBM now has 130,000 Mac and iOS devices deployed and is adding an additional 1,900 Macs each week"

    This could have a huge effect in the corporate world:

    * IBM provides IT support services to a huge number of corporate clients. They will likely advise those clients that the MAC is a good alternative to Windows. And they will know how to make that happen, because they have successfully done it at IBM.

    * Companies and individuals will see that IBM has deployed the MAC in-house, and they will then take a serious look at deploying the MAC in their own companies.

    A huge number of people already have iPhones and want to be able to use them to connect to the corporate network. This will fit in nicely with that.

    http://www.computerworld.com/article...money-ibm.html

  2. #2
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    I'd be tempted to think that this is limited to within the US!
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    I'd be tempted to think that this is limited to within the US!
    I guess it depends on two things:

    1. How big is IBM outside of the US?
    2. How ticked off are companies at Microsoft outside of the US?

    A third possibility is: How much do people like the MAC outside of the US?

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    It's a major cost to start using Macs as the support staff have to be trained / increased. There is also the issue of specialized software to consider.
    I can't see Windows being replaced any time soon.

    cheers, Paul

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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    I guess it depends on two things:

    1. How big is IBM outside of the US?
    2. How ticked off are companies at Microsoft outside of the US?

    A third possibility is: How much do people like the MAC outside of the US?
    The fourth and immediately relevant point (other than the very important ones which Paul T makes) is the relative cost of Mac hardware compared with Windows boxes. Certainly in the UK Apple products have always been disproportionately expensive compared with the US.
    BATcher

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    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps
    A third possibility is: How much do people like the MAC outside of the US?
    If my local mall (and McDonalds) is any indicator then it's possibly down to the Apple logo on the device's lid (i.e. 'coolness') battery life and the size of the education market.

    (Side thought: Why do teens apparently do homework in groups in a mall or McD? Is it just to 'be seen'?)

    I've seen many tiny MacBook Airs, a couple of Pros (used by adults) and not one Chromebook, Surface or any other make of 'Windows' device. (iPads are now rare for some reason... I seem to be the only one with an iPad [Mini].)

    I understand why there's no Chromebooks... wifi is patchy in the local mall (but so good at the local McD that you can't park close due to the number of 'connectoids' sat in their vehicles typing/swiping away).

    I'm going to make a guess that it's our local secondary (high) schools' reliance on iPads as teaching aids that has become the driving force. As a result, our local education system appears to be becoming solely Apple orientated/dominated. Both classwork and homework needs to be submitted in common formats... so, increasingly, the use of Apple products at home is justified by 'I need an Air to do my homework'.

    Apart from 'coolness', there's portability and battery life. It's all very well to say that Apple products are more expensive but when you get into the realms of products that are small, lightweight, reasonably powerful and last all day then, IMO, there's very little difference in price.

    (Thanks, America. I'm showing my age now but I remember back when Brits used to describe 'malls' as 'shopping precincts'. ROFL)
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2016-10-27 at 08:47.

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    There have been periodic moves away from Windows in the past, but the cost of Mac's compared to PC's has often been the limiting factor.

    The major limiting factor with business has always been software. Excluding Office and similar cross-platform programs, a large chunk of the software used in business is primarily or only available on PC's.

    PC's may be losing ground to Mac's but until cost and software even out, the PC will still have the stronger position.
    Graham Smith
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    I'm sorry, but momentum, ecosystem services, employee skills and corporate comfort levels still tilt the pendulum towards Microsoft. And strongly so.

    IBM? When was IBM last a thought leader in the corporate PC world? That was around the time that Compaq was still an independent company. And if you note, IBM is offering Macs as an option, not as a universal corporate mandate.

    Apple can be good or even great, when they put their mind to it. However they no longer offer servers, OSX has been in the slow lane of development, their hardware Mac lineup has been neglected for several years now, iTunes is a bloated mess and multiple other productivity applications like Keynote are also languishing.

    Apple does not offer: Directory Services, a database, internet servers, anything like SCOM or Azure, CRM, SharePoint, Dynamics, BizTalk, Axapta, Exchange, SBS. Yes, these are all server side technologies, but the point is that Microsoft knows how to speak the language of business IT, and is able to offer a compelling integrated product stack.

    The other thing I would have to ask is, why is the Mac special? Why couldn't it be Linux instead? The same arguments all apply to Linux, yet the old joke is that This Is The Year Of Linux On The Desktop!

    I would argue that many corporations are willing to allow a more heterogeneous PC install base now. That is more along the lines of permitting some exceptions to a straight vanilla, 100% standardized PC build. This is a far cry from an end to Windows being a corporate preference.

  9. #9
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    I'm sorry, but momentum, ecosystem services, employee skills and corporate comfort levels still tilt the pendulum towards Microsoft. And strongly so.
    A lot of companies are now allowing iPhones and Androids to connect to the corporate network. At my last job, we allowed this, even though there were continual problems with account lockups because of these devices. [/QUOTE]

    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    IBM? When was IBM last a thought leader in the corporate PC world? That was around the time that Compaq was still an independent company.
    We're not talking IBM PCs; we're talking IBM IT services. IBM is well-established in that arena. If they recommend the MAC, at least some of their customers will go with that recommendation.

    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    Apple can be good or even great, when they put their mind to it. However they no longer offer servers, OSX has been in the slow lane of development, their hardware Mac lineup has been neglected for several years now, iTunes is a bloated mess and multiple other productivity applications like Keynote are also languishing.

    Apple does not offer: Directory Services, a database, internet servers, anything like SCOM or Azure, CRM, SharePoint, Dynamics, BizTalk, Axapta, Exchange, SBS. Yes, these are all server side technologies, but the point is that Microsoft knows how to speak the language of business IT, and is able to offer a compelling integrated product stack.
    I think that Apple sees this as a very rare opportunity, and they will devote a lot of resources to making the most of it. According to the article, the MAC is ready for corporate deployment, and that's one of the reasons that IBM is so enthusiastic about it.

    IBM has a strong reputation in the server arena. And Linux has a lot of dominance as well in the server arena. I am not impressed with the quality of Microsoft networking. The reason Microsoft has the dominance they have on the server side is because Bill Gates was an excellent pied piper, getting companies to buy his product for a variety of reasons other than that his product was the best.

    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    The other thing I would have to ask is, why is the Mac special? Why couldn't it be Linux instead? The same arguments all apply to Linux, yet the old joke is that This Is The Year Of Linux On The Desktop!
    A lot of people perceive the MAC as being better than Windows; those same people know nothing about Linux. With IBM pushing it, I think the MAC has a window of opportunity here that, if they are smart, they will exploit. And if they build on this opportunity, they could become a leading corporate desktop provider.

    Also, Apple, an established company, supports the MAC. There is no corresponding established company who supports Linux (except maybe Red Hat).

    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    I would argue that many corporations are willing to allow a more heterogeneous PC install base now. That is more along the lines of permitting some exceptions to a straight vanilla, 100% standardized PC build. This is a far cry from an end to Windows being a corporate preference.
    It will be a while before Windows is not a corporate presence. I'm sure that it will be around for some time to come. Rather, what I am predicting is that this move by IBM could spell the end of the Windows dominance on the corporate desktop.

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    WS Lounge VIP access-mdb's Avatar
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    In the UK at least Apple might not do as well as you think as they've just raised their prices here by a hefty amount. And Marmite has gone up by 12.5% in one supermarket. On both counts I'm not worried!
    Talk is cheap because supply exceeds demand

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    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by access-mdb
    In the UK at least Apple might not do as well as you think as they've just raised their prices here by a hefty amount.
    You forgot the bit at the end of the article about Microsoft raising prices by 22% in the UK for some business services.

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    WS Lounge VIP access-mdb's Avatar
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    HaHa, so I did!
    Talk is cheap because supply exceeds demand

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    ... The same arguments all apply to Linux, yet the old joke is that This Is The Year Of Linux On The Desktop! ...
    BHarder, that's not fair, mentioning a joke and not telling it!
    Eike J Heinze
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    It's the old showbiz adage: Always leave the crowd wanting more!

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    We're not talking IBM PCs; we're talking IBM IT services.
    I'm aware of that. However I've dealt with IBM and many other companies, both in consulting and product support roles. These large consulting operations do not take on technology advocacy and are neither interested in 'sticking it to Microsoft' nor 'advocating for Apple'.

    Here's what the big consultants are interested in:

    1). If the customer says they want it then the consultants want it too. The customer is always right in this regard;
    2). If it will drive new business, new consulting engagements and consulting contracts, the consultants want that. Deeply, profoundly, and persistently;
    3). Consultants love any story that ends with, "doing this reduces your costs by x% (x needs to be greater than 10) without any additional business risk or operations disruption".

    A business switching from Windows to Mac is little more than shuffling the deck chairs. And IBM doing this internally is a very different matter from IBM selling this as a value proposition to potential services customers.

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