Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Recovery Disk v Media Creation

    In case of disaster, is is better or advisable to have a Windows 10 Media Creation tool, Windows 10 Recovery Disk or both. Since both are bootable and can repair/restore are both necessary? Advantages for one over the other?

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    719
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 144 Times in 130 Posts
    The best way is to clone your hard drive to an identical hard drive and update it regularly. If anything goes wrong, you just change over the drives and clone the working drive to the corrupted one, giving you two working drives again, or if its failed, you replace it and lose nothing. Its easier, quicker and more reliable than trying to fix the corrupted OS.

    http://www.farstone.com/software/drive-clone.php

    The program for home use is free.

  3. #3
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    561
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 68 Times in 66 Posts
    The thing you want to avoid is getting caught without any options. Now in truth, there's always an option, so then the issue is to avoid getting caught without having a good option. Few things are worse than suffering a failure and knowing (or suspecting) it could be fixed easily, "if only I had done Easy Step X".

    So what are the downsides to having both a Media Creation tool and a Recovery Disk? Not much really... the media aren't very expensive and they don't take much room to store. Creating a full Media Creation system does take a while to download the whole system, especially if you opt for the combined 32 and 64-bit images. So that's what I'd do.

    A full Media Creation system does age rather rapidly, unless you don't mind applying all the updates subsequent to a full install using that tool.

    I'm partial to the Recovery Disk because it's a purpose-built tool and it doesn't age so rapidly. Use the appropriate tool for the job and all that.

    The key thing for me is, make sure you have one on a bootable DVD and the other on a bootable USB stick. There are still systems that have one and not the other. And if you are recovering from some incident, the incident itself may mean that hardware that was present and working, is suddenly not working. Effective and efficient recovery is all about keeping your options available.

  4. #4
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Paducah, Kentucky
    Posts
    420
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 67 Times in 64 Posts
    If there is an advantage to cloning, it is the speed with which you can swap disks (assuming you know how to remove your internal hard drive and replace it quickly). If your hard disk fails then cloning was a handy thing to have done.
    One advantage of imaging is that you can also quickly restore an image previously made and be back up and running (as long as your problem isn't that your disk drive has failed). I can restore an image of any of my computers much faster and more conveniently than I can replace their internal hard drive(s) with a previously made clone.
    So, I prefer imaging instead of cloning.

    I agree completely with BHarder insofar as avoiding finding oneself in a situation where good options are limited.
    On the other hand, when it comes to a preference between Media Creation Tool and a Recovery Disk, I always opt for the MCT created flash drive (CD/DVD). If you only have a single computer then the Recovery Disk is a good option (for it), but if you often find yourself wanting to do an inplace upgrade/re-install of Windows 10 on a different computer (some client's computer in my situation) then the MCT might be preferable.
    Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup...
    - - - - -
    Home Built System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek High Definition Audio

  5. #5
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Then to the problem - creating the recovery disk. Windows 10 replies that it is missing files necessary to create the recovery disk.

    I have tried
    reagentc /disable then reagentc /setreimage /path \\?\GLOBALROOT\device\harddisk0\partition1\Recover y\WindowsRE

    but windows replies that REAGENTC.EXE: The specified path was not found. partition 1 is my C Drive containing Windows 10 - on harddisk 0.

    Any suggestions?

    Many thanks

  6. #6
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    56
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    These are all excellent ways to recover the operating system. Back up your data to separate media. If disaster strikes, you don't want to depend on OS recovery to recover your data.

    Mark

  7. #7
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    56
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Does running "reagentc /info" return the recovery image location?

    Mark

  8. #8
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    56
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts

  9. #9
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,188
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 983 Times in 913 Posts
    I suspect it would be easier to use a 3rd party image/backup utility and their boot media. (Aomei Backupper, Macrium Reflect, EaseUS ToDo etc)

    cheers, Paul

  10. #10
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    561
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 68 Times in 66 Posts
    Also, make sure you test those bootable sticks and disks! Another common failure mode when trying to recover is discovering, hey, this media isn't actually bootable at all. Something went wrong when creating them.

    Testing is as simple as can be. You don't want to "recover" anything during the test. Just boot your computer with the recovery media and make sure you can get to a functioning command prompt, GUI screen, or whatever recovery environment that system provides. If you can get to a working user screen you are done. It's quite acceptable to assume that the individual recovery tools/functions/whatever, also work from that point forward.

  11. #11
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Many thanks. It did indeed solve the problem.

  12. #12
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mojave Desert CA
    Posts
    1,842
    Thanks
    258
    Thanked 175 Times in 148 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by slacker2113 View Post
    Many thanks. It did indeed solve the problem.
    What worked??

  13. #13
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    The link from mledman above (https://www.winhelp.us/restore-windows-re.html) directing me to Winhelp.us .. Restore Windows RE. Followed the instructions and I was able to restore the Windows Recovery Environment. Sorry for the obfuscation.

  14. #14
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mojave Desert CA
    Posts
    1,842
    Thanks
    258
    Thanked 175 Times in 148 Posts
    Thanks as it may help others to know what worked for you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •