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  1. #1
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    Case sensitive ADO Seek

    Anyone know how to make an ADO seek case sensitive?
    If I write

    rstPermits.Seek "C", adSeekFirstEQ

    it successfully finds "c".

    I changed the "Option Compare Database" to "Option Compare Binary" but that only affects variable comparisons inside the module.

    TIA
    Donald

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    I don't have an answer for you, but I do have a question: why don't you consider c and C equivalent? Case is such an iffy thing between application engines and operating systems that trying to match case is going to be nothing but a headache for you. Is there possibly some other way to accomplish whatever it is you want to do?
    Charlotte

  3. #3
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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    I am building an A2K application and the user wants a simple password system that doesn't involve the convoluted security mess that Microsoft delivers with Access [lots and lots of users that would be an administrative nightmare to manage.] What I am shooting for is the ability to test for a case sensitive password, ie "Dave" does not equal "dave".

  4. #4
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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    I'd recommend against it, then. Don't try to make it case sensitive because you can't. You don't want a dave and a Dave and a DAVE with separate passwords, so just tell them upfront the thing is NOT case sensitive and don't allow more than one of each name by indexing the field as No Duplicates.

    By the way, that convoluted security mess is actually a highly effective way of controlling access to a database. If this is sensitive data, don't skimp on the security by rolling your own. I've built simple login systems when all they wanted to do was make sure that the user logging in only got to look at their own data, but if I were limiting access to the database itself, I'd go with Access security every time.
    Charlotte

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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    1. No, the *UserIDs* are unique: There is only one "Dave", no matter where the capitaliztion occurs. The *Passwords* can be the same. Every one could have the same password. The password is where I wanted case sensitivity.

    2. This system is like a kiosk. Anyone can walk up to it and if their name is in the personnel table and they have never been in before, they will be prompted to make a new (case sensitive) password, and then they can LOOK at certain areas. If they need to do more than look, they will have to have a higher level of permissions granted by an "administrator." We don't want to make the administrator have to individually put in *everybody* (the first place that this system will be tested will have about 1300 potential individuals walking up to look.)

    Furthermore, on a given form, a walkup user will only have permission for the "Search" function, where some one at the next higher level will have permissions to the "Add", some one at the next higher level will have permission to the "Modify" function, and so on up the chain. The system is being designed with a front-end / back-end where the data is seperate from the code. We don't want the people using this to have to use the Access security system because then they would have to know everything about every table and form in the system I am building. The idea is that this our system could be put on any computer that has Access2K installed, the backends would be locked by the Access system (the frontend will be compiled) and it could be run without anyone there having to know anything about Access. Fanciful? I guess we'll find out.

    And although you find the Access security system "highly effective", I am of the opinion that it's effectiveness lies in the fact that it is so convoluted that no one except a computer professional with a lot of time can understand it. I have 30 years of computer experience on numerous systems (including Oracle) although I am new to Access and I, frankly, find it a confusing mess. Perhaps I am just having trouble with the delivered documentation and if I went and found some other discussions it would make more sense.

    Thanks for your thoughts.

  6. #6
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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    As long as the UserIDs are unique, why should their passwords have to be? It's the combination of UserID and password that forms a unique login, so case sensitivity shouldn't be an issue.

    You can't compare Access to a database server. Oracle security or SQL Server security is a far different animal from Access security. Access security has to work around the fact that it IS possible to get to the database from non-secured versions of Access or even from other programs. Database servers control access to the database, regardless.

    What I did in a similar situation was to build a USysLogin table in my backend and link it to the front end. The login form let a new user put in any username they wanted but forced them to enter an employee number, which was verified against a table of valid employees. Then it required them to enter a password and verify it, after which it created a new entry in USysLogin with a default permissions level. Any subsequent logins required the user to enter the username and password. It also gave them the means to change either, but kept them linked to the employee number of the original. It sounds pretty much like what you're doing.
    Charlotte

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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    I'll have to study your method -- it looks like it might help me.

    You are correct, of course, about the userid/password set being unique. The case sensitivity issue just came up because it seems to occur in about half of the places I have passwords around the internet. I decided I wanted to do it in Access and the propeller on my beany started twirling from the steam and heat when I couldn't make it happen.

    Thanks

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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    You never need to search for a password. User inputs the employee ID, You find the employee record and upload the stored password to a variable (p1), get user input as a variable (p2) then if p1=p2 you go ahead. This comparison will be case sensitive by default.
    David Grugeon
    Brisbane Australia

  9. #9
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    Re: Case sensitive ADO Seek

    Only if you set Option Compare Binary for the module. Otherwise, it uses a case-insensitive compare.
    Charlotte

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