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  1. #1
    4 Star Lounger
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    Disc Check in XP

    XP doesn't have scandisc.exe or the scan disc function of Win 9X. It has disc check to recover
    bad sectors or fix disc errors. If you check both boxes or ck. the one that says "automatically fix file system errors" (accessed through C's Properties or
    the MMC) I noticed that you don't see the disc check progress bars run, but you get a dialogue
    box that says "The disc ck. could not be performed because it needs exclusive access to
    some Windows files on the disc. These can be accessed only by restarting. Do you want to
    schedule this the next time you restart?"
    When you choose "Yes" on reboot you see a lt. blue screen that references the NTFS
    and the disc for a couple seconds. The other option by itself will run progress bars
    and I guess depending on the situation of the clusters and the number of disc errors
    took me about 35 minutes and 4 different progress bars.
    1) Is this analagous to the Win 9X Scan disc that could be done quickly or take a long time
    if you did a complete one in Safe Mode?
    2) If the dialogue box on restart does the same thing, how can it get done in two seconds
    what takes 35 minutes the other way. I did it both ways--the short way several times first.
    Until I checked the box "Scan for and Attempt Recovery of Bad Sectors" alone (I thought
    the other one automatically fix was necessary to fix) I couldn't get those progress bars to run.
    Or the short version is "what is the best way to use this utility?"

    Thanks.

    defrag

  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: Disc Check in XP

    <hr>XP doesn't have scandisc.exe or the scan disc function of Win 9X. It has disc check to recover bad sectors or fix disc errors.<hr>
    Really, it does have ScanDisk, but it's the NT version, and it looks a lot different. It's also much more thorough at what it does.

    When you run CHKDSK (the NT/2k/XP name for it) without the checkboxes specified, it runs through your files and indexes. It will find and fix a limited number of errors.

    When you specify one of the checkbox options, you are essentially telling XP to perform automatic fixes, the second option more equivalent to a surface scan. Both options must be done at boot time because while running, XP has the file system locked open for access, and no other application can access the drive to perform repairs.

    There are not really any close analogies to the 9x version, due to the file systems suppported and the nature of the operating system. Just to be safe, I try to schedule regular boot-time CHKDSK runs, about once a month on a production machine that is behaving, and more frequently on one that is acting a little strange. Initially, run through the thorough option twice to see if you have errors recurring - run the checks a few days apart. If you don't have any problems after the second run, then you can get away with this operation on a less frequent basis
    -Mark

  3. #3
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    Re: Disc Check in XP

    Marc--appreciate the good info--books don't explain what you explained about the physiology of
    disc check. But as you know there are two boxes, and if you check both or the top box
    which says 1) Auto-fix system errors) you don't see much happeneing and a lt. blue screen flashes
    on booting up for about 3 seconds max which references the disc and NTFS. That's what I've been
    doing . Is that option doing a more thorough or less thorough "fix series of maneuvers" because you
    don't see much going on--could most of the action be in the background? The reason I tried to check
    both is because the top box says "Auto Fix system errors"--that generates the dialogue box . If you say
    "yes" you'll see the 3 second blue screen on booting up--if you say "no" it will just close down.
    I had thought to actually fix you neeeded that auto fix box checked analagous say to the old 9X's
    or non-NT's box asking you if you wanted to fix--or Norton System Work's little box where it
    "checks the registry--shortcuts ect.--7 categories and then asks you if you want to fix them.
    Who's going to want to leave errors if they're real anyway? I don't mean the actual mechanism
    but the scenario where it detects and then you get to say fix.
    My point is checking both boxes or checking only Auto Fix produces the dialogue box
    and the screen on boot that is very transient.
    This morning I only checked the bottom or second box "Scan for and attempt recovery..."
    without the top box and I got progress bars numbered one to four and the first three took about
    a couple minutes and number four took about thirty. It gave the illusion that checking only the
    second box was more thorough and it involved nothing on booting.
    I appreciate what you're describing but I still don't understand the difference between
    at least with the GUI or on the surface seem to be different processes.
    You say "both options need to be run at boot time" but there does not seem to be any
    connection with checking the bottom box alone--its subsequent checkdisc progress bars (there
    were 4 of them numbered one through four first something through fourth something" and booting/.
    They ran without a boot. Please try it--the top box alone and you'll see something happen not
    connected to a reboot. If you reboot with that checked--you won't see anything but a boot and
    the same blue screen. I always see that blue screen mentionioning scanning the disc and the
    NTFS for a couple seconds on boot whether I access this utility or not. If you check the second or
    bottom--you get something that runs progress bars unrelated to booting.
    What I am trying to figure out is what is the difference? 2) What is the correct way to run
    it? 3) You say "the second option is more equivalent to a surface scan" but the second or bottom
    option took 35 minutes and the top doesn't take any essential extra time. It just gives you the
    option to perform something on boot and the something happens very quickly with no progress
    bars. How can that something be meaningful if it's running so quickly seconds in contrast to a
    4 dialogue process that takes 35 minutes?

    Appreciative for the help but still confused. I would like to get you to go and check that second
    box only--the one on the bottom "Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors" because I think
    you will see progress bars run--they will take a while but not more than 30 minutes depending
    on the size of your hard drive--because it does not seem to require or be conneced to a reboot.
    Trying to understand the difference and thanks.

    defrag
    dialogue

  4. #4
    4 Star Lounger
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    CHKDSK at Cmd. Line is Different

    Marc--I am running CHKDSK at the command line now and it seems to be different and involves
    putting up the dos prompt. It is not finished checking and it could prompt me to restart I'll see.
    But it appears to be different than those two dialogue boxes you reach on the tool tab of
    C-Drive Properties which is where the two boxes I've been asking you about are. So I wonder
    what is the difference between what I described from the Tool Tab and putting CHKDSK in
    at the command line or what I began calling the "Run" box which then brings up the dos prompt
    for its action.

    I just ran CHKDSK at the command line. It brought up the dos prompt and in three minutes it
    does three stages of a "check" where the percent checked tallies up quickly to 100%. It says
    "F parameter not specified running CKDSK in Read Only Mode" at the top and then below
    says "CKDKSK" is varifying files Stages 1 o3, Stages 2 of 3, and Stages 3 of 3 and runs to 100%
    in each and takes about five minutes and doesn't involve booting up and then you're done.
    If I'm supposed to specify F parameter I'm not sure what it is-or how to specify it. I think it's
    different than formatting or running F Disc.
    But this was different than those two boxes I was trying to get you to run from the Tools Tab
    of C Drive properties and as you know on the Dos prompt this calls itself C:WINDOWS
    SYSTEM 32CHKDSK.exe on the name or title bar of the dos prompt.

    Thanks

    defrag

  5. #5
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    Re: CHKDSK at Cmd. Line is Different

    Chkdsk
    Creates and displays a status report for a disk, based on the file system used. Chkdsk also lists and corrects errors on the disk. If chkdsk cannot lock the drive it will offer to check it the next time the computer restarts.

    Issuing the chkdsk command on a fixed disk requires you be a member of the Administrators group.

    chkdsk [drive:][[path] filename] [/f] [/v] [/r] [/l[:size]] [/x]

    Parameters

    none

    Used without parameters, chkdsk displays the status of the disk in the current drive.

    drive:

    Specifies the drive that contains the disk that you want chkdsk to check.

    [path] filename

    Specifies the location and name of a file or set of files that you want chkdsk to check for fragmentation. You can use wildcard characters (* and ?) to specify multiple files.

    /f

    Fixes errors on the disk. The disk must be locked. If chkdsk cannot lock the drive it will offer to check it the next time the computer restarts.

    /v

    Displays the name of each file in every directory as the disk is checked.

    /r

    Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information. The disk must be locked.

    /l[:size]

    NTFS only. Changes the log file size to the size you enter. Displays the current size if you don't enter a new one.

    /x

    NTFS only. Forces the volume to dismount first, if necessary. All open handles to the volume are then invalid. This switch also includes the functionality of the /f switch.

    /i

    NTFS only. Performs a less vigorous check of index entries, reducing the amount of time needed to run chkdsk.

    /c

    NTFS only. Skips the checking of cycles within the folder structure, reducing the amount of time needed to run chkdsk.

  6. #6
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: CHKDSK at Cmd. Line is Different

    The GUI version of disk checking and the command line CHKDSK are different tools, a different means to the same end. The GUI version is run as part of Windows Explorer and is not a separate program. If it cannot obtain exclusive access to the drive being checked - files open, you name it - then it will pass the buck to CHKDSK by setting a registry flag to run it at reboot (if you tell it to schedule the disk check). Since the GUI version and CHKDSK are completely and wholly separate from one another, there is no direct correlation between the two; however, they both accomplish the same task.

    Personally, I always use CHKDSK /F and plan to reboot when checking the drives. I double size my taskbar and have the address bar sitting there at all times so that I can type executable names in and run them without clicking on fifty dialogs. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15> I simply have more confidence in CHKDSK because I can see details.

    <hr>If I'm supposed to specify F parameter I'm not sure what it is-or how to specify it.<hr>
    At the RUN prompt or a command prompt, enter CHKDSK /FWithout the /F specified, CHKDSK will not fix any errors. Why bother? If there aren't any errors on the drives, then you could save yourself a reboot - particularly important in critical applications where downtime is not a good option.[/quote]
    <hr>I think it's different than formatting or running F Disc.<hr>
    FDISK is a DOS-mode partitioning utility for hard drives. It's completely different than checking for errors.

    Clear as mud now? <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15>
    -Mark

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