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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    LCD Flat Panel Monitors

    Having just acquired an LCD Flat Panel monitor, I'm wondering if there are any special considerations for its care. Specifically, we've always used screen blankers, or savers to prevent burn-in with CRT monitors. Is there something like this for LCD's? Is it better to let the PC power them down after short intervals, or is it better for them to just stay on?

    Thanks for any thoughts, or references. Other than my laptop, this is the first time I've had one of these things.

    --Bob Harris <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15>
    -Bob Harris
    "Seek Simplicity, Then Mistrust It!"


  2. #2
    Bronze Lounger
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    Re: LCD Flat Panel Monitors

    Hi
    Since LCD panels are 'active' devices, constantly switching and and off is likely to do more harm than leaving them on for long periods. This is true, incidentally, of other electronic components esp. the CPU and associated hardware.
    afaik it has been a long time since screensavers of any kind were required, even for CRTs, unless you have very old ones, or monochrome displays (remember the old amber/green?) They were susceptible to permanent burn damage. Modern phosphors do not change permanently nearly as easily.
    Many people leave their machines on for long periods, although the display can be (soft) switched off to save energy, eg. when left overnight. This lessens the number of currrent surges through components that are potentially sensitive to it. The downside is that mechano-electric parts, such as fans and their bearings, wear out quicker.
    I believe the same sort of arguments apply to flat-screen displays. If you can leave your system powered up, but can turn off the screen, that's what I would advise.

    (You need to bear in mind security issues if you are leaving your system up. I usually log-off, requiring a password to get back in.
    Note also that the hassle associated with getting Hibernate, Sleep or Stand-by to work properly with Windows, is not worth the candle.)

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    Re: LCD Flat Panel Monitors

    The liquid crystals themselves should have a life expectancy far in excess of the usable life of the rest of your hardware. What has a rather limited life is the backlighting used, and from what I can ascertain, these lamps have a typical life of 15,000 to 20,000 hours, around 2 years or so continuous use.
    I would suggest powering down when not in use.

    LCD's are far more fragile than CRT's because of the thinness of the glass and polarizing filters used. Avoid touching the screen, particularly with fingers, and follow the manufacturers recommendations for cleaning the screen.

  4. #4
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: LCD Flat Panel Monitors

    Ah, better late than never, yes? I thought you might be interested in some of what Brian Livingston recently had to say regarding LCDs. If you visit the archive of his WindowManager columns over at Infoworld, he ran a series beginning on November 21, 2001 that included some great resources and sound advice. It might be of benefit to you to check it out.

    DisplayMate also has a nifty little tool for tuning displays, and not just LCD ones. Never used it, but I am intrigued.
    -Mark

  5. #5
    3 Star Lounger
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    Re: LCD Flat Panel Monitors

    Thank you, Mark. I had forgotten about that article. I checked out the Displaymate site. The software looks very interesting. I'll give it some consideration. This monitor is working very well; I just don't know if I want to spend $70 for the relatively minor adjustment. It's worth thinking about though, that's for sure.

    I really appreciate you bringing Brian's article back to mind.

    --Bob
    -Bob Harris
    "Seek Simplicity, Then Mistrust It!"


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