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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Backing up personal folders to CD (2000 SR-1)

    Our users typically set up their personal folders (*.pst) on their H: (home) drive. Occasionally, these personal folders become so large that they cause the user to reach the storage limit (typically, 100MB) allocated to them for their H: drive. When this happens, we ask them to clean and compact their personal folders. Some users prefer to either have all or part of their personal folder burned to a CD.

    The problem is, it is awkward for the users to access these *.pst files afterwards. The CD has to be inserted, and the *.pst copied from the CD to a local drive; then, the local file has to have the read-only attribute removed; then, they have to attach the personal folder in Outlook. I'm wondering if there isn't an easier method of backing up personal folders to CD. Anyone?
    The postings on this site are my own and do not necessarily represent the position or opinion of WCNOC.

  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: Backing up personal folders to CD (2000 SR-1)

    This may not be any help, but FWIW ...

    1. * .pst archives are about 50% compressible with PKZip; you could have users Zip them and retain them on the LAN userdrive. Hmm, maybe you can import a *.pst file directly from a Zip file on a CD by opening them in the zip file and then opening the pst in OL by double clicking the file in the zip contents window, I don't have the platform to test it (and I use PKZip, not WinZip).

    2. Attachments are the most common culprit causing big PSTs. Ask users to detach attachments which are also redundantly copied to the LAN users drive. I kinda like the look of this tool because it writes the file path URL into the message body Sperry Attachment Save. I have my own crude version of this but it doesn't write the path or have any awareness of filename changes, it just writes the original attachment file name.

    (Only 100 MB per user? Our nice IT people give us 2 GB. My pst is 105 MB and it contains no attachments, but then I have folders going back to Genesis.)
    -John ... I float in liquid gardens
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  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger
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    Re: Backing up personal folders to CD (2000 SR-1)

    <hr>1. * .pst archives are about 50% compressible with PKZip; you could have users Zip them and retain them on the LAN userdrive. Hmm, maybe you can import a *.pst file directly from a Zip file on a CD by opening them in the zip file and then opening the pst in OL by double clicking the file in the zip contents window, I don't have the platform to test it (and I use PKZip, not WinZip).<hr>
    We use WinZip, but only have so many licenses available. Probably one out of ten PCs on our site have WinZip. We do not allow unlicensed software on our PCs.

    <hr>(Only 100 MB per user? Our nice IT people give us 2 GB. My pst is 105 MB and it contains no attachments, but then I have folders going back to Genesis.)<hr>
    Yes, but with around 1,280 users, that amounts to 128GB, all on one server. Add to that the fact that some people in special circumstances (mostly management) have higher limits (usually no higher than 1GB), and you'll see why our limits are so low. We try to discourage huge attachments and Genesis-era message archiving... <img src=/S/sarcasm.gif border=0 alt=sarcasm width=15 height=15>

    I've seen at least one pst that was too large to fit on an 800MB CD, and had to be split. If that sounds like fun, imagine trying to run the Inbox Repair Tool on a pst that size. Start the process...get a cup of coffee...heck, make a pot of coffee...hmmm...maybe go to Brazil and harvest the beans... <img src=/S/laugh.gif border=0 alt=laugh width=15 height=15>
    The postings on this site are my own and do not necessarily represent the position or opinion of WCNOC.

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