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  1. #1
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    ODBC/SQL Server Permissions (A2K/SQL 2000)

    I have a Front End connected to a SQL Server database using ODBC. I am having problems getting the permissions to work correctly. I can access the DB no problem. Then I add another user from the domain and he cannot connect at all. Do the security settings take hold right away? Are there some big issues using ODBC to connect using permissions?

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    Mark

  2. #2
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    Re: ODBC/SQL Server Permissions (A2K/SQL 2000)

    OK more to this story, I was able to set up permissions that appear to work for the initial connection. However, I cannot control what happens to individual objects in the database. Is this a limitation of ODBC? It appears that once a connection is established, you have free reign on the DB. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Mark

  3. #3
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    Re: ODBC/SQL Server Permissions (A2K/SQL 2000)

    When you are using ODBC, you create a permanent connection to a SQL Server database. If you are on an NT domain then you probably want to use Integrated security with SQL Server, and you specify that login at the time the connection to a database is made. If you are running on Win9x/ME workstations, then you use the standard security, and you have to create login IDs for each user, and their ODBC connection needs to use that login name. Permissions to SQL objects work much like Access permission, though you do have some additional options. Note however that Access permissions don't have any real effect on SQL Server tables connected to an Access (MDB) database - that needs to be done in SQL Server. Hope this helps get you working - it is a powerful combination that we often work with.
    Wendell

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