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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    We have a newly established home LAN that will not allow two way sharing of files and printers.

    One machine is a new Dell Inspiron that came with factory installed Windows XP Pro. The file system is NTFS.

    The second machine is a No-Brand Pentium 4 with Windows XP Pro. The file system is FAT32. Both machines are connected through a hub/router to a DSL modem and see the Internet just fine.

    We have turned OFF the MS Firewall on both machines. We have defined sharing on each machine. We have used the same P2P workgroup name. (HOUSE in this case.) Each machine has a different name.

    The Dell (NTFS) machine can see the files and printer on the No-Brand (FAT32) machine just fine. The FAT32 machine cannot see the FTNS machine at all. Using Network Places produced the message "HOUSE is not accessible."

    Does anyone have an idea on what is causing this probelm?

    John

  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    Is the Guest account disabled on the NTFS machine? Or have any permissions been changed? Also, make sure that both systems are in the same workgroup.
    -Mark

  3. #3
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    ...and running identical network protocols. And it wouldn't hurt to have some identical accounts shared between the two, i.e. an account with adminstrative privileges is identically named and has the same password on both machines.

  4. #4
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    Thanks to you and WyllyWylly for responding. I will answer both of you in this message.

    1) Both guest accounts are enabled.
    2) Both systems are on the same workgroup. (HOUSE)
    3) Both systems are running identical protocols. (TCP/IP)
    4) Both systems have an account with administrative privileges, identical names & identical passwords.

    Still same results. i.e. the FAT32 machine gets the message --- "HOUSE is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. --- The network path was not found."

    John

  5. #5
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    But is TCP/IP the only protocol running on both machines? I know it's not the best thing to do from an efficiency/security standpoint, but I have NetBIOS and IPX running on all of my systems in my home office network in addition to TCP/IP and it works. And I don't have the guest account enabled on any of them. It's kinda like voodoo <img src=/S/witch.gif border=0 alt=witch width=15 height=15>, this P2P networking stuff - why don't you give that a try?

  6. #6
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    John,
    Did you use any old parts to build this machine, or did you get ALL new boards?

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  7. #7
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    Dave:

    The FAT32 machine is a mix of old and new. The mainboard and one SCSI HD are new. The MB has on board video, audio and NIC. The SCSI adapter, one HD, CD burner, DVD & modem are old. The NTFS machine is new Dell.

    John

  8. #8
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    The FAT32 machine has only TCP/IP installed. The NTFS machine has TCP/IP, IPX & NetBIOS installed and running. Of course, both have Client for Microsoft Networks & File and Printer Sharing active.

    I am assuming that you are suggesting that we disable the guest account on both machines. What about other accounts such as the identically named and passworded accounts?

    Yes, I agree that this is all like voodoo. Just have not found the correct chants to use.

    John

  9. #9
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    I've found it to be absolutely crucial that the identical protocols and ONLY the same protocols are running on all P2P connected machines - therefore, first try adding NetBios and IPX to the FAT32 machine. Leave the guest account on both machines for now - my understanding had always been (and my experience has shown) that if identical user accounts/passwords are being used on the different machines, the guest account isn't necessary. Let us know if that helps.

  10. #10
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    Well, that helped -- some.

    I installed IXP and NetBIOS on the FAT32 machine and now it can see the "HOUSE" workgroup. However, the NTFS machine does not show up. In fact the NTFS machine cannot see itself when looking at HOUSE. When the FAT32 machine clicks on the name of the NTFS machine (I8200) in the folders panel under HOUSE we get the message -- "I8200 is not accessible."

    While the hard drive on the NTFS machine is set for sharing it would appear that that machine is not setup to share anything with the network. Even though it is acknowledged as being in HOUSE.

    Any ideas?

    John

  11. #11
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    "I8200 is not accessible." Looks like it could be a security problem. Can you look in the Security Event log to see if there are any interesting entries.

    StuartR

  12. #12
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    The FAT32 machine does not have any Security Events and the NTFS machine has only one. That one event appears to be Dell clearing the Event Log before shipping the machine.

    Thanks,

    John

  13. #13
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    Sorry, yes, NetBEUI - I've been a little fixated on POST issues lately....

  14. #14
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    <P ID="edit" class=small>(Edited by jscher2000 on 09-Sep-02 17:50. Found some MSKB links!)</P>Are we all reading NetBIOS to mean NetBEUI? If you search NetBEUI on this board, you should find more discussion.

    More Info:

    Microsoft Knowledge Base Article - Q306059 - The NetBEUI Protocol Is Not Available in Windows XP

    Microsoft Knowledge Base Article - Q301041- HOW TO: Install NetBEUI on Windows XP

  15. #15
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: NTFS vs FAT32 On A Home LAN

    No problem. I haven't seen XP yet, so it was just a good guess on my part.

    If home networking doesn't work properly without NetBEUI, it's difficult to understand what MS thinks it's doing hiding it in a ValueAdd folder... To me, the fact that NetBEUI is not routable is a big security advantage.

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