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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    RSM Database Corrupt (XP Pro)

    <img src=/S/thinks.gif border=0 alt=thinks width=15 height=15> Ready? I'm experiencing an interesting problem with a USB thumbdrive which had previously worked fine on this same machine. Bascially, the thumbdrive is installed automatically by WinXp as a USB Mass Storage Device, and identified as a removeable drive in Explorer.

    When I plugged the device in tonight, it worked fine for a bit, and then the Explorer window I was using to access it's contents spontaneously shut itself off, accompanied by the sounds of a USB device being removed. Not being tricked by such an obtuse display of persnicketiness, I found the following entries, repeated on an every-minute basis (in summary form):

    Error
    RSM cannot manage library PhysicalDrive2. The database is corrupt.
    Event ID: 15

    Now those are some sweet-sounding words. Off to EventID.net I go, and only find this page which contains no references to the Removeable Storage Manager. Now, this MSKB article gives instructions on how to rebuild the RSM by basically removing the existing registry entry. I'm a little concerned about jumping ahead on this one since my symptoms don't exactly match those described in the MSKB article, and the smarty-pants people at EventID didn't see my particular Event coming either. Moreover, this is not the only problem I've been having with USB devices lately, so I'm concerned about a bigger problem being at hand.

    Has anyone run into this problem before and have any advice on how to troubleshoot this problem correctly? TIA!

  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: RSM Database Corrupt (XP Pro)

    I like a good problem. Especially when it's someone else's. <img src=/S/duck.gif border=0 alt=duck width=23 height=23> <img src=/S/flee.gif border=0 alt=flee width=25 height=25> <img src=/S/rofl.gif border=0 alt=rofl width=15 height=15>

    The Microsoft article was interesting <img src=/S/yawn.gif border=0 alt=yawn width=15 height=15> and exceptionally concise. The last paragraph caught my eye:
    <hr>RSM facilitates communication between removable-media storage systems and data management programs, such as Windows Backup and RSS. RSM labels, catalogs, and tracks all media, controls the drives, slots, and doors, and provides uniform drive cleaning operations.<hr>
    So if I understand that correctly, that means that it controls the whole ball of wax. Any USB so much as sniffles, and RSM knows about it.

    If you're having other USB problems and there is this all-knowing all-powerful USB database living in your system's bowels, I think it stands to reason that the database may well be corrupted. That said, maybe it's time to let the system rebuild it. What this article appears to state is that if you follow the steps, it will create a new, fresh database, and then import the data from the old one that is automatically backed up. This removes broken table structures in the database, yada yada. In effect your're not losing the database, you're just pouring the old data into a new container.

    If you decide to take the plunge, run the system backup utility and back up the system state. If you're really determined and hyper-cautious, you could install the Recovery Console and manually back up the registry hives too.

    Tedious work and probably not good to undertake after fighting it all day....if you take the plunge, I commend you, and hope to hear of good results. And maybe even a better answer than the one I provided that doesn't recommend tinkering with the guts of Windows. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>
    -Mark

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