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  1. #1
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    SQL Server 2000: Windows Server Permissions

    I am a newly appointed DBA for our first SQL Server project and I am finding myself in somewhat of a turf battle with our Win2k Server admins. What I need to know is what Win2k Server permissions are required to effectively manage and administer a SQL Server? So far they have me bottlenecked to the point that I cannot even start and stop the SQL Servers, the SQL Server agent, or any other Win2k services. I need to find some definitive information on what permissions are required so that I can make my case.

    Thanks for any and all help!

  2. #2
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    Re: SQL Server 2000: Windows Server Permissions

    Nick, If the services are started automatically, you should not need access to them. You need access to the enterprise manager. You should be able to do a little reasearch at the MS site for the privileges you need. I'd guess you need at least 'power user' but don't know for sure.

    Joe
    Joe

  3. #3
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    Re: SQL Server 2000: Windows Server Permissions

    Nick:

    First of all, best of luck!

    All of the SQL Server services run under some Windows user account. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess in your case it's running under the domain Administrator account because that was probably how somebody was logged into the SQL server when SQL was installed. If they don't want you to have access to that account info ask them to create a domain account that they can grant administrative rights over the server to. In Enterprise Manager, you can change all of the SQL services, MSSQLServer, the SQL Agent, etc., to run under that account. You'll also want to know the System Administrator, or sa, account info for SQL as well.

    For backing up db's, you'll also want to make sure your new domain account has necessary rights to write files to some backup location, preferably on another server.

    I think that should get you started. Again, best of luck!
    <font face="Comic Sans MS"><font color=blue>~Shane</font color=blue></font face=comic>

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