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  1. #1
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    Cannon Problem (200)

    I know I posted this up before but I don

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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    Like this.....
    Jan Karel Pieterse
    Microsoft Excel MVP, WMVP
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  3. #3
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    fantastic ! thanks a lot

  4. #4
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    You might have asked your question in a reply in the previous thread. In fact, Steve (sdckapr) has already answered your question, but you are using a non-standard way of measuring the angle. Mathematicians start at the positive x-axis and count counter-clockwise (see attached picture). In your case, starting at the positive Y-axis and counting clockwise:

    X = distance * SIN(RADIANS(angle))
    Y = distance * COS(RADIANS(angle))

    In the example, distance = 7 meters and angle = 116 degrees, so X = 7*SIN(RADIANS(116)) = 6.29 and Y = 7*COS(RADIANS(116)) = -3.07 (rounded to 2 decimals)

  5. #5
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    Saw steve's answer but couldnt quite grasp it, as i was doing something wrong somewhere which i wasnt sure was down to the way i posted the orgiginal question, hence the reposting.

    why on earth do mathemticians do it counterclockwise ?

    My next bit is now is wind resistance , off googling!

  6. #6
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    The reason that mathematicians measure angles counterclockwise is probably related to the standard coordinate system: positive x-axis points "East", positive y-axis points "North". Starting from the positive x-axis and going towards the positive y-axis, you turn counterclockwise. But in the end, it's just a convention.

  7. #7
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    This makes me wonder if Mathemticians are good maps readers,

    Heres how my spreadsheet is going, I have yet to put in the "Direct Hit" coding and for an added element I am adding a Team of journalist wondering around as well to avoid,

    This is expanding on my other post usesless things you can do in excel,

    Please note I know the coding is dirty at the moment !

  8. #8
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    Next time round, instead of DELETING your original post which leaves all the answers to that post hanging in the wild, EDIT the post instead of starting a new thread, thanks. <img src=/S/exclamation.gif border=0 alt=exclamation width=15 height=15>
    Cheers, Claude.

  9. #9
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    Steve,

    If you substitute Angle = 0 in your formula, 90-Angle = 90, so Sin = 1 and Cos = 0, leading to X = distance and Y = 0 (disregarding p1 instead of pi)

    I think <post#=242441>post 242441</post#> contains the correct formulas for Chance's coordinate system.

  10. #10
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    My sample file further up this thread should be correct too...
    Jan Karel Pieterse
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  11. #11
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    Yes, of course. Sorry for not mentioning your post too <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15>.

    The formulas in your and my post are basically the same; the RADIANS function multiplies by PI()/180.

  12. #12
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    <P ID="edit" class=small>(Edited by sdckapr on 10-Apr-03 07:13. change/correct PI from P1)</P>If you want to "work with" your "degree syntax" use:

    X = distance * SIN((90-angle)/180*pi())
    Y = distance * COS((90-angle)/180*pi())

    Where angle is the degrees with North = 0, East = 90, etc. The "90-Angle" puts it into the math standard and the "/180 * Pi()" converts to radians

    Steve

  13. #13
    WS Lounge VIP sdckapr's Avatar
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    Re: Cannon Problem (200)

    Yes, I thought that is what he wanted.

    In his "degree scheme" 90

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