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  1. #1
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    References in Access (2002)

    Where can I find out what each of the references in Access does? I've been wanting to ask this for years! <img src=/S/compute.gif border=0 alt=compute width=40 height=20>

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: References in Access (2002)

    I assume the references you can set in the Visual Basic Editor by selecting Tools/References...

    In Visual Basic, you manipulate "objects" that have "properties", "methods" and "events". They are organized into "Object Libraries" that make these objects and their properties etc. visible to the programmer.

    There are two references you can't uncheck; they are needed whenever you write code in Access 2002:
    <UL><LI>Visual Basic for Applications. This is the generic Visual Basic reference. It's the same for all Office applications. In Office 2000 and Office XP, it's based on Visual Basic 6. It contains all the standard language elements of Visual Basic.
    <LI>Microsoft Access 10.0 Object Library. This contains all the Access-specific objects except for Data objects: Form, Report, ...[/list]By default, two other references will be checked, but they are not always needed:
    <UL><LI>Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects 2.* Library. The ADO library contains objects to access data, such as Recordset, Field, Connection etc. ADO is the default data model in Access 2000 and up. You can also use DAO, which was the data model up to and including Access 97, but to do so, you must set a reference to the Microsoft DAO 3.6 Object Library. ADO and DAO have some objects with the same name, such as Recordset and Field; it is wise to specify explicitly which one you mean to avoid confusion:
    Dim rst As ADODB.Recordset
    Dim fld As DAO.Field
    <LI>OLE Automation. This library contains some objects needed to manipulate OLE controls in code. In many cases, you can uncheck this reference without harm.[/list]There are very many other references you can set, too many to enumerate here - it depends on the software installed on your PC. I will just mention some of them:
    <UL><LI>Microsoft Office 10.0 Object Library. Needed if you want to manipulate the menu bar and toolbars in code (collectively called CommandBars), and if you want to program the Office Assistant (ugh).
    <LI>Microsoft Word 10.0 Object Library. You can control Word in code - start Word, create or open documents, manipulate their contents etc. This is called Automation.
    <LI>Microsoft Excel 10.0 Object Library, Microsoft PowerPoint 10.0 Object Library, Microsoft Outlook 10.0 Object Library - used to control Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook via Automation.[/list]

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: References in Access (2002)

    <font color=448800>How can you be sure that no trees were harmed in order to inconvenience all those electrons?</font color=448800>

  4. #4
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    Re: References in Access (2002)

    Thanks for the info, that was some of what I didn't know. But apparently there's no single place to gather all of that information. Ah well, nothing is ever that easy. And as for the electrons, consider it my poor attempt at humor. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>

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